nvidia driver what do you recommend

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nvidia driver what do you recommend

Peter J. Philipp-3
I remember someone else writing to this list before saying the nvidia
driver is really slow.  I just upgraded my main workstation from 5.3 to
5.4 and it indeed is.

So I'm wondering what driver I should use because the choppyness of
moving windows is laughable, a sad kind of laugh.

Do you recommend I get an ATI/AMD card?  What sorts of models would you
recommend?

Thanks for any clue,

-peter

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Re: nvidia driver what do you recommend

Brett Mahar-2
On Mon, 28 Oct 2013 11:20:32 +0100
"Peter J. Philipp" <[hidden email]> wrote:

| I remember someone else writing to this list before saying the nvidia
| driver is really slow.  I just upgraded my main workstation from 5.3 to
| 5.4 and it indeed is.
|
| So I'm wondering what driver I should use because the choppyness of
| moving windows is laughable, a sad kind of laugh.
|
| Do you recommend I get an ATI/AMD card?  What sorts of models would you
| recommend?
|

The "ATI Radeon HD 5450" works great with the recently added radeon KMS code, I got one for A$30 a few weeks ago, no problems seen, definitely no chopppyness using mplayer -vo xv in fullscreen 1080p, did have problems with a 96fps 4096x2304 video I tried out, however:-)

Brett.

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Re: nvidia driver what do you recommend

Jonathan Gray-11
In reply to this post by Peter J. Philipp-3
On Mon, Oct 28, 2013 at 11:20:32AM +0100, Peter J. Philipp wrote:
> I remember someone else writing to this list before saying the nvidia
> driver is really slow.  I just upgraded my main workstation from 5.3 to
> 5.4 and it indeed is.
>
> So I'm wondering what driver I should use because the choppyness of
> moving windows is laughable, a sad kind of laugh.
>
> Do you recommend I get an ATI/AMD card?  What sorts of models would you
> recommend?

Try to avoid GCN/Southern Islands Radeons as we don't do acceleration on
those because they don't support normal x style acceleration only a mess
of EGL/glamor/LLVM that doesn't work yet.

So Radeon HD < 77xx, 8000 < Radeon HD < 85xx, Radeon R5 2xx should work.

Keeping in mind all the recent Radeon KMS work and the mesa update isn't
in 5.4 only -current.

5.4 only supports acceleration with up to R600/R700 class hardware it
isn't possible to buy new anymore.

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Re: nvidia driver what do you recommend

Peter J. Philipp-3
In reply to this post by Brett Mahar-2
On 10/28/13 11:44, Brett Mahar wrote:

> On Mon, 28 Oct 2013 11:20:32 +0100
> "Peter J. Philipp" <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> | I remember someone else writing to this list before saying the nvidia
> | driver is really slow.  I just upgraded my main workstation from 5.3 to
> | 5.4 and it indeed is.
> |
> | So I'm wondering what driver I should use because the choppyness of
> | moving windows is laughable, a sad kind of laugh.
> |
> | Do you recommend I get an ATI/AMD card?  What sorts of models would you
> | recommend?
> |
>
> The "ATI Radeon HD 5450" works great with the recently added radeon KMS code, I got one for A$30 a few weeks ago, no problems seen, definitely no chopppyness using mplayer -vo xv in fullscreen 1080p, did have problems with a 96fps 4096x2304 video I tried out, however:-)
>
> Brett.
>

Hi Brett,

Well I took your advice and bought this card.  I'm not a high
performance freak when it comes to monitor so I think it'll be alright.
 I paid 27 euros on amazon.de for it.  It does match my MSI N250GTS Twin
Frozr 1G in DDR3 1 GB RAM but not sure about performance, I'll have to
see. :-)

Cheers,

-peter

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Re: nvidia driver what do you recommend

Gilles Cafedjian
I have the same problem but on a dell laptop with integrated NVidia
chip.
The chip is NVidia Geforce 8600M GS and since I upgraded to 5.4 my
laptop is
unusable (very slow window movement). I'm thinking of reinstall 5.3 to
have a
working laptop. I can't change GPU chipset.
There is a solution to get a working window manager back?

Thanks,
Gilles Cafedjian.

Le 2013-10-29 11:34, Peter J. Philipp a écrit :

> On 10/28/13 11:44, Brett Mahar wrote:
>
>> On Mon, 28 Oct 2013 11:20:32 +0100 "Peter J. Philipp" <[hidden email]> wrote: | I remember someone else writing to this list before saying the nvidia | driver is really slow. I just upgraded my main workstation from 5.3 to | 5.4 and it indeed is. | | So I'm wondering what driver I should use because the choppyness of | moving windows is laughable, a sad kind of laugh. | | Do you recommend I get an ATI/AMD card? What sorts of models would you | recommend? | The "ATI Radeon HD 5450" works great with the recently added radeon KMS code, I got one for A$30 a few weeks ago, no problems seen, definitely no chopppyness using mplayer -vo xv in fullscreen 1080p, did have problems with a 96fps 4096x2304 video I tried out, however:-) Brett.
>
> Hi Brett,
>
> Well I took your advice and bought this card. I'm not a high
> performance freak when it comes to monitor so I think it'll be alright.
> I paid 27 euros on amazon.de for it. It does match my MSI N250GTS Twin
> Frozr 1G in DDR3 1 GB RAM but not sure about performance, I'll have to
> see. :-)
>
> Cheers,
>
> -peter

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Re: nvidia driver what do you recommend

Matthieu Herrb-5
On Tue, Oct 29, 2013 at 05:36:43PM +0100, Gilles Cafedjian wrote:
> I have the same problem but on a dell laptop with integrated NVidia
> chip.
> The chip is NVidia Geforce 8600M GS and since I upgraded to 5.4 my
> laptop is
> unusable (very slow window movement). I'm thinking of reinstall 5.3 to
> have a
> working laptop. I can't change GPU chipset.
> There is a solution to get a working window manager back?

If the VESA BIOS on you machine supports the native resolution of the
panel, then running the vesa driver is probably faster than the nv
driver.

Otherwise, if some people with development skills want to help, I can
see 3 different projects there, with different levels of complexity
and interest (I currently miss time to work on these issues.):

project 1 - relatively easy
get yourself familiar with the shadowfb implementation in the vesa
driver and then fix it in xf86-video-nv. xf86-video-nv's shadowfb is
currently disabled because it crashes the driver. This would probably
bring most of the speed back for a relatively low effort.

project 2 - a bit harder
get yourself familiar with the EXA acceleration framework, and port
the current XAA code in xf86-video-nv to EXA. Bitblt operations should
give you a reasonable speed-up back on supported cards. But the XAA
code is full of magic numbers (no docs, remember) and since EXA is
probably also going to get dropped by X.Org in the future, this is
probably not the best choice, but it's still interesting to learn
about 2D acceleration in X.Org drivers.

project 3 - hard
dive into the world of DRI and TTM and port the nouveau kernel
driver(s) to OpenBSD. Thanks to jsg@ and kettenis@, OpenBSD has now a
Linux kernel kernel 3.8 compatible version of the dri infrastructure
(including TTM) for intel and radon chipsets. Getting the
corresponding nouveau code is thus possible. This is a multi-months
project but it's an exciting one and it will provide the most benefit
for people forced to use nVidia cards, and for the project in general
since having more people hacking in the dri code is also good for the
other drivers.
--
Matthieu Herrb

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Re: nvidia driver what do you recommend

Gilles Cafedjian
Hello,

Indeed, switching to vesa driver in xorg.conf removed all the windows
lags.
I don't need any kind of 3D acceleration, so vesa is just enough to run
Emacs and resizing some windows.
I think the best will be to port Nouveau to OpenBSD, but it's not a
priority.
As I said, vesa is just good enough to work with basic 2D, for people
stuck with Nvidia.

Thanks,
Gilles Cafedjian.

Le 2013-10-30 08:08, Matthieu Herrb a écrit :

> On Tue, Oct 29, 2013 at 05:36:43PM +0100, Gilles Cafedjian wrote:
>
>> I have the same problem but on a dell laptop with integrated NVidia chip. The chip is NVidia Geforce 8600M GS and since I upgraded to 5.4 my laptop is unusable (very slow window movement). I'm thinking of reinstall 5.3 to have a working laptop. I can't change GPU chipset. There is a solution to get a working window manager back?
>
> If the VESA BIOS on you machine supports the native resolution of the
> panel, then running the vesa driver is probably faster than the nv
> driver.
>
> Otherwise, if some people with development skills want to help, I can
> see 3 different projects there, with different levels of complexity
> and interest (I currently miss time to work on these issues.):
>
> project 1 - relatively easy
> get yourself familiar with the shadowfb implementation in the vesa
> driver and then fix it in xf86-video-nv. xf86-video-nv's shadowfb is
> currently disabled because it crashes the driver. This would probably
> bring most of the speed back for a relatively low effort.
>
> project 2 - a bit harder
> get yourself familiar with the EXA acceleration framework, and port
> the current XAA code in xf86-video-nv to EXA. Bitblt operations should
> give you a reasonable speed-up back on supported cards. But the XAA
> code is full of magic numbers (no docs, remember) and since EXA is
> probably also going to get dropped by X.Org in the future, this is
> probably not the best choice, but it's still interesting to learn
> about 2D acceleration in X.Org drivers.
>
> project 3 - hard
> dive into the world of DRI and TTM and port the nouveau kernel
> driver(s) to OpenBSD. Thanks to jsg@ and kettenis@, OpenBSD has now a
> Linux kernel kernel 3.8 compatible version of the dri infrastructure
> (including TTM) for intel and radon chipsets. Getting the
> corresponding nouveau code is thus possible. This is a multi-months
> project but it's an exciting one and it will provide the most benefit
> for people forced to use nVidia cards, and for the project in general
> since having more people hacking in the dri code is also good for the
> other drivers.

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Re: nvidia driver what do you recommend

Comète-2
Hello,
I've tried vesa too and it works but it is limited to 1024x768... if you
have any tips to allow 1440x900 with vesa, i take it...

Thanks

Morgan

Le 02/11/2013 16:10, Gilles Cafedjian a écrit :

> Hello,
>
> Indeed, switching to vesa driver in xorg.conf removed all the windows
> lags.
> I don't need any kind of 3D acceleration, so vesa is just enough to run
> Emacs and resizing some windows.
> I think the best will be to port Nouveau to OpenBSD, but it's not a
> priority.
> As I said, vesa is just good enough to work with basic 2D, for people
> stuck with Nvidia.
>
> Thanks,
> Gilles Cafedjian.
>
> Le 2013-10-30 08:08, Matthieu Herrb a écrit :
>
> On Tue, Oct 29, 2013 at 05:36:43PM +0100, Gilles Cafedjian wrote:
>
> I have the same problem but on a dell laptop with integrated NVidia
> chip. The chip is NVidia Geforce 8600M GS and since I upgraded to 5.4
> my laptop is unusable (very slow window movement). I'm thinking of
> reinstall 5.3 to have a working laptop. I can't change GPU chipset.
> There is a solution to get a working window manager back?
>
> If the VESA BIOS on you machine supports the native resolution of the
> panel, then running the vesa driver is probably faster than the nv
> driver.
>
> Otherwise, if some people with development skills want to help, I can
> see 3 different projects there, with different levels of complexity
> and interest (I currently miss time to work on these issues.):
>
> project 1 - relatively easy
> get yourself familiar with the shadowfb implementation in the vesa
> driver and then fix it in xf86-video-nv. xf86-video-nv's shadowfb is
> currently disabled because it crashes the driver. This would probably
> bring most of the speed back for a relatively low effort.
>
> project 2 - a bit harder
> get yourself familiar with the EXA acceleration framework, and port
> the current XAA code in xf86-video-nv to EXA. Bitblt operations should
> give you a reasonable speed-up back on supported cards. But the XAA
> code is full of magic numbers (no docs, remember) and since EXA is
> probably also going to get dropped by X.Org in the future, this is
> probably not the best choice, but it's still interesting to learn
> about 2D acceleration in X.Org drivers.
>
> project 3 - hard
> dive into the world of DRI and TTM and port the nouveau kernel
> driver(s) to OpenBSD. Thanks to jsg@ and kettenis@, OpenBSD has now a
> Linux kernel kernel 3.8 compatible version of the dri infrastructure
> (including TTM) for intel and radon chipsets. Getting the
> corresponding nouveau code is thus possible. This is a multi-months
> project but it's an exciting one and it will provide the most benefit
> for people forced to use nVidia cards, and for the project in general
> since having more people hacking in the dri code is also good for the
> other drivers.

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Re: nvidia driver what do you recommend

Gilles Cafedjian
Hello
I think vesa driver allow only built-in resolution of your bios.
I saw in my Xorg.0.log:
...
(II) VESA(0): Not using mode "1440x900_60.00" (no mode of this name)
...
(--) VESA(0): Virtual size is 1024x768 (pitch 1024)
(**) VESA(0): *Built-in mode "1024x768"
(**) VESA(0): *Built-in mode "800x600"
(**) VESA(0): *Built-in mode "640x480"
(==) VESA(0): DPI set to (96, 96)
(II) VESA(0): Attempting to use 60Hz refresh for mode "1024x768" (118)
...
...

I guess I'm stuck with 1024x768 too :(

Le 2013-11-02 16:37, Comète a écrit :

> Hello,
> I've tried vesa too and it works but it is limited to 1024x768... if you
> have any tips to allow 1440x900 with vesa, i take it...
>
> Thanks
>
> Morgan
>
> Le 02/11/2013 16:10, Gilles Cafedjian a écrit :
>
>> Hello, Indeed, switching to vesa driver in xorg.conf removed all the windows lags. I don't need any kind of 3D acceleration, so vesa is just enough to run Emacs and resizing some windows. I think the best will be to port Nouveau to OpenBSD, but it's not a priority. As I said, vesa is just good enough to work with basic 2D, for people stuck with Nvidia. Thanks, Gilles Cafedjian. Le 2013-10-30 08:08, Matthieu Herrb a écrit : On Tue, Oct 29, 2013 at 05:36:43PM +0100, Gilles Cafedjian wrote: I have the same problem but on a dell laptop with integrated NVidia chip. The chip is NVidia Geforce 8600M GS and since I upgraded to 5.4 my laptop is unusable (very slow window movement). I'm thinking of reinstall 5.3 to have a working laptop. I can't change GPU chipset. There is a solution to get a working window manager back? If the VESA BIOS on you machine supports the native resolution of the panel, then running the vesa driver is probably faster than the nv driver. Otherwise, if som
 e people
with development skills want to help, I can see 3 different projects there, with different levels of complexity and interest (I currently miss time to work on these issues.): project 1 - relatively easy get yourself familiar with the shadowfb implementation in the vesa driver and then fix it in xf86-video-nv. xf86-video-nv's shadowfb is currently disabled because it crashes the driver. This would probably bring most of the speed back for a relatively low effort. project 2 - a bit harder get yourself familiar with the EXA acceleration framework, and port the current XAA code in xf86-video-nv to EXA. Bitblt operations should give you a reasonable speed-up back on supported cards. But the XAA code is full of magic numbers (no docs, remember) and since EXA is probably also going to get dropped by X.Org in the future, this is probably not the best choice, but it's still interesting to learn about 2D acceleration in X.Org drivers. project 3 - hard dive into the world of DRI and TTM
  and
port the nouveau kernel driver(s) to OpenBSD. Thanks to jsg@ and kettenis@, OpenBSD has now a Linux kernel kernel 3.8 compatible version of the dri infrastructure (including TTM) for intel and radon chipsets. Getting the corresponding nouveau code is thus possible. This is a multi-months project but it's an exciting one and it will provide the most benefit for people forced to use nVidia cards, and for the project in general since having more people hacking in the dri code is also good for the other drivers.

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Re: nvidia driver what do you recommend

Brad Smith-14
On 02/11/13 11:57 AM, Gilles Cafedjian wrote:

> Hello
> I think vesa driver allow only built-in resolution of your bios.
> I saw in my Xorg.0.log:
> ...
> (II) VESA(0): Not using mode "1440x900_60.00" (no mode of this name)
> ...
> (--) VESA(0): Virtual size is 1024x768 (pitch 1024)
> (**) VESA(0): *Built-in mode "1024x768"
> (**) VESA(0): *Built-in mode "800x600"
> (**) VESA(0): *Built-in mode "640x480"
> (==) VESA(0): DPI set to (96, 96)
> (II) VESA(0): Attempting to use 60Hz refresh for mode "1024x768" (118)
> ...
> ...
>
> I guess I'm stuck with 1024x768 too :(

Correct, that's one of many reasons to want to have a port of the
Nouveau driver. Using the VESA driver is pretty awful.

--
This message has been scanned for viruses and
dangerous content by MailScanner, and is
believed to be clean.

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Re: nvidia driver what do you recommend

Eric Furman-3
On Sat, Nov 2, 2013, at 01:55 PM, Brad Smith wrote:

> On 02/11/13 11:57 AM, Gilles Cafedjian wrote:
> > Hello
> > I think vesa driver allow only built-in resolution of your bios.
> > I saw in my Xorg.0.log:
> > ...
> > (II) VESA(0): Not using mode "1440x900_60.00" (no mode of this name)
> > ...
> > (--) VESA(0): Virtual size is 1024x768 (pitch 1024)
> > (**) VESA(0): *Built-in mode "1024x768"
> > (**) VESA(0): *Built-in mode "800x600"
> > (**) VESA(0): *Built-in mode "640x480"
> > (==) VESA(0): DPI set to (96, 96)
> > (II) VESA(0): Attempting to use 60Hz refresh for mode "1024x768" (118)
> > ...
> > ...
> >
> > I guess I'm stuck with 1024x768 too :(
>
> Correct, that's one of many reasons to want to have a port of the
> Nouveau driver. Using the VESA driver is pretty awful.

No, the right answer is to not buy Nvidia cards, get a refund for the
one you
bought and then write them letters telling them why.