making man(1) to open a file

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making man(1) to open a file

Lévai, Dániel
Hi!

I think there is a way for this but I can not find it in man's man :)

Like in Linux there is a `-l' option to man(1) which opens a Local file,
like man -l /usr/local/man/man1/somemanpage.1. I'm in trouble opening
net-snmp package's snmpd(8) or snmpd.conf(5) man page, because it
conflicts with the base's snmpd's man pages. Now I'm reading it with
less, but it is less convenient :)

Thanks for the help!

Daniel

--
LEVAI Daniel
PGP key ID = 0x4AC0A4B1
Key fingerprint = D037 03B9 C12D D338 4412  2D83 1373 917A 4AC0 A4B1

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Re: making man(1) to open a file

Stuart Henderson
On 2008-09-21, LIVAI Daniel <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Like in Linux there is a `-l' option to man(1) which opens a Local file,
> like man -l /usr/local/man/man1/somemanpage.1. I'm in trouble opening
> net-snmp package's snmpd(8) or snmpd.conf(5) man page, because it
> conflicts with the base's snmpd's man pages. Now I'm reading it with
> less, but it is less convenient :)

man -M /usr/local/man snmpd

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Re: making man(1) to open a file

Hannah Schroeter
In reply to this post by Lévai, Dániel
Hi!

On Sun, Sep 21, 2008 at 09:22:24PM +0200, LIVAI Daniel wrote:
>I think there is a way for this but I can not find it in man's man :)

>Like in Linux there is a `-l' option to man(1) which opens a Local file,
>like man -l /usr/local/man/man1/somemanpage.1. I'm in trouble opening
>net-snmp package's snmpd(8) or snmpd.conf(5) man page, because it
>conflicts with the base's snmpd's man pages. Now I'm reading it with
>less, but it is less convenient :)

No, but in your case, you can use the option -M /usr/local/man (or -m
/usr/local/man) probably.

Kind regards,

Hannah.

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eSATA support?

Brian-79
I'm thinking about picking up an eSATA pci card and backing up my data to an external hd over eSATA using rsync.  Is this supported?  

Thanks,

Brian

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Re: making man(1) to open a file

Lévai, Dániel
In reply to this post by Hannah Schroeter
On Sunday 21 September 2008 21.51.48 Hannah Schroeter wrote:
> No, but in your case, you can use the option -M /usr/local/man (or -m
> /usr/local/man) probably.
>
On Sunday 21 September 2008 21.45.59 Stuart Henderson wrote:
> man -M /usr/local/man snmpd

Argh, thanks, thanks! Sorry, I knew I read it too fast...

Daniel

--
LEVAI Daniel
PGP key ID = 0x4AC0A4B1
Key fingerprint = D037 03B9 C12D D338 4412  2D83 1373 917A 4AC0 A4B1

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Re: making man(1) to open a file

Paul de Weerd
In reply to this post by Lévai, Dániel
On Sun, Sep 21, 2008 at 09:22:24PM +0200, L?VAI D?niel wrote:
| Hi!
|
| I think there is a way for this but I can not find it in man's man :)
|
| Like in Linux there is a `-l' option to man(1) which opens a Local file,
| like man -l /usr/local/man/man1/somemanpage.1. I'm in trouble opening
| net-snmp package's snmpd(8) or snmpd.conf(5) man page, because it
| conflicts with the base's snmpd's man pages. Now I'm reading it with
| less, but it is less convenient :)
|
| Thanks for the help!

Next to the useful suggestions you've received so far, you can try

        groff -man -Tascii /path/to/manpage.X | less

to render the specific page.

Cheers,

Paul 'WEiRD' de Weerd

--
>++++++++[<++++++++++>-]<+++++++.>+++[<------>-]<.>+++[<+
+++++++++++>-]<.>++[<------------>-]<+.--------------.[-]
                 http://www.weirdnet.nl/                 

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Re: eSATA support?

Damien Miller
In reply to this post by Brian-79
On Sun, 21 Sep 2008, Brian wrote:

> I'm thinking about picking up an eSATA pci card and backing up my data
> to an external hd over eSATA using rsync. Is this supported?

eSATA is a conector, cable and electrical specification and otherwise is
identical to regular SATA. If the particular adapter's chipset you have
chosen is supported for SATA then it will work for eSATA.

-d

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Re: eSATA support?

Louis V. Lambrecht-3
Damien Miller wrote:

> On Sun, 21 Sep 2008, Brian wrote:
>
>  
>> I'm thinking about picking up an eSATA pci card and backing up my data
>> to an external hd over eSATA using rsync. Is this supported?
>>    
>
> eSATA is a conector, cable and electrical specification and otherwise is
> identical to regular SATA. If the particular adapter's chipset you have
> chosen is supported for SATA then it will work for eSATA.
>
> -d
>
>
>  
PCI card for (e)SATA ???
Does this mean the motherboard hasn't a SATA connector and/or does not
have support?
In that case, you would better be off with a fast USB.
Again MBs with no SATA don't have fast USBs either.

Since you are asking, I guess you should start with establishing a budget:
- eSATA (as USBs) will need an enclosure. These generally come with a
power supply.As do "external hard disks". Those cases cost the price of
a hard disk.
- "external hard disks" often are supplied with two interfaces,
any combination of Ethernet/USB/eSATA. Those with two interfaces usually
are dearer, but the hard disk itself also is of better quality.
- external cabinets can be RAID and/or NAS (these are yet another
computer in fact).
- recent fully integrated motherboards (with SATA and fast USB)
are cheaper than a VGA card.

My eSATA disk is housed in an Antec cabinet (with extra cooling), comes
with SATA and USB. I mostly use the USB interface as this one can
easily be connected and disconnected on almost every box.
eSATA brakets seem to be a spare that is hard to find at standard
PC shops.

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Re: making man(1) to open a file

Bryan Irvine
In reply to this post by Paul de Weerd
On Sun, Sep 21, 2008 at 3:33 PM, Paul de Weerd <[hidden email]> wrote:

> On Sun, Sep 21, 2008 at 09:22:24PM +0200, L?VAI D?niel wrote:
> | Hi!
> |
> | I think there is a way for this but I can not find it in man's man :)
> |
> | Like in Linux there is a `-l' option to man(1) which opens a Local file,
> | like man -l /usr/local/man/man1/somemanpage.1. I'm in trouble opening
> | net-snmp package's snmpd(8) or snmpd.conf(5) man page, because it
> | conflicts with the base's snmpd's man pages. Now I'm reading it with
> | less, but it is less convenient :)
> |
> | Thanks for the help!
>
> Next to the useful suggestions you've received so far, you can try
>
>        groff -man -Tascii /path/to/manpage.X | less
>

man -a is easier though.

-B

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Re: making man(1) to open a file

Cezary Morga-5
Dnia czwartek, 25 wrze6nia 2008, Bryan Irvine napisa3:
> > Next to the useful suggestions you've received so far, you can try
> >
> >        groff -man -Tascii /path/to/manpage.X | less
>
> man -a is easier though.
>
> -B

-a     Display all of the manual pages for a specified section and name
        combination.  Normally, only the first manual page found is dis-
        played.

You're sure that's the one?

--
Cezary Morga
"A real administrator is always logged in as root - it's CRAP
administrators that aren't!" (BOFH @theregister.co.uk)

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Re: making man(1) to open a file

Stuart Henderson
On 2008-09-26, Cezary Morga <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Dnia czwartek, 25 wrze6nia 2008, Bryan Irvine napisa3:
>> > Next to the useful suggestions you've received so far, you can try
>> >
>> >        groff -man -Tascii /path/to/manpage.X | less
>>
>> man -a is easier though.
>>
>> -B
>
> -a     Display all of the manual pages for a specified section and name
>         combination.  Normally, only the first manual page found is dis-
>         played.
>
> You're sure that's the one?

Given the original problem, "I'm in trouble opening net-snmp package's
snmpd(8) or snmpd.conf(5) man page, because it conflicts with the base's
snmpd's man pages", that's quite appropriate and easy-to-use. Thanks
Bryan :)

As you see here, when asking on mailing lists, you'll get more useful
answers if you give an explanation of what you want to do, rather than
just think of one way to do it and ask how to do that.

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Re: making man(1) to open a file

Bryan Irvine
In reply to this post by Cezary Morga-5
On Fri, Sep 26, 2008 at 11:43 AM, Cezary Morga <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Dnia czwartek, 25 wrze6nia 2008, Bryan Irvine napisa3:
>> > Next to the useful suggestions you've received so far, you can try
>> >
>> >        groff -man -Tascii /path/to/manpage.X | less
>>
>> man -a is easier though.
>>
>> -B
>
> -a     Display all of the manual pages for a specified section and name
>        combination.  Normally, only the first manual page found is dis-
>        played.
>
> You're sure that's the one?

Yeah that's the one.
Instead of halting at the first page it finds (the openbsd native) it
then brings you to the next page found once you've scrolled through
the first.

-B

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Re: making man(1) to open a file

François Chambaud-2
In reply to this post by Cezary Morga-5
Cezary Morga <[hidden email]> writes:

> Dnia czwartek, 25 wrze6nia 2008, Bryan Irvine napisa3:
> > > Next to the useful suggestions you've received so far, you can try
> > >
> > >        groff -man -Tascii /path/to/manpage.X | less
> >
> > man -a is easier though.
> >
> > -B
>
> -a     Display all of the manual pages for a specified section and name
>         combination.  Normally, only the first manual page found is dis-
>         played.
>
> You're sure that's the one?
>
> --
> Cezary Morga
> "A real administrator is always logged in as root - it's CRAP
> administrators that aren't!" (BOFH @theregister.co.uk)
>
>
>

If the PAGER variable is set to "less", you can examine the next manual
page with ":n", the previous manual page with ":p" and the first manual
page again with ":x".

Tested with "man -a disklabel":

/usr/share/man/cat8/disklabel.0 (file 1 of 3) (END) - Next: /usr/share/man/cat5/disklabel.0
/usr/share/man/cat5/disklabel.0 (file 2 of 3) (END) - Next: /usr/share/man/cat9/disklabel.0
/usr/share/man/cat9/disklabel.0 (file 3 of 3) (END)

$ uname -srm
OpenBSD 4.3 i386

--
Francois Chambaud
http://www.chambaud.org

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Re: : making man(1) to open a file

Raimo Niskanen-7
On Fri, Sep 26, 2008 at 11:59:49PM +0200, Frangois Chambaud wrote:

> Cezary Morga <[hidden email]> writes:
>
> > Dnia czwartek, 25 wrze6nia 2008, Bryan Irvine napisa3:
> > > > Next to the useful suggestions you've received so far, you can try
> > > >
> > > >        groff -man -Tascii /path/to/manpage.X | less
> > >
> > > man -a is easier though.
> > >
> > > -B
> >
> > -a     Display all of the manual pages for a specified section and name
> >         combination.  Normally, only the first manual page found is dis-
> >         played.
> >
> > You're sure that's the one?
> >
> > --
> > Cezary Morga
> > "A real administrator is always logged in as root - it's CRAP
> > administrators that aren't!" (BOFH @theregister.co.uk)
> >
> >
> >
>
> If the PAGER variable is set to "less", you can examine the next manual
> page with ":n", the previous manual page with ":p" and the first manual
> page again with ":x".
>
> Tested with "man -a disklabel":
>
> /usr/share/man/cat8/disklabel.0 (file 1 of 3) (END) - Next: /usr/share/man/cat5/disklabel.0
> /usr/share/man/cat5/disklabel.0 (file 2 of 3) (END) - Next: /usr/share/man/cat9/disklabel.0
> /usr/share/man/cat9/disklabel.0 (file 3 of 3) (END)

Another way is:

$ man -f disklabel
disklabel (5) - disk pack label
disklabel (8) - read and write disk pack label
disklabel, readdisklabel, writedisklabel, setdisklabel, bounds_check_with_label (9) - disk label management routines

$ man 8 disklabel
:
:

>
> $ uname -srm
> OpenBSD 4.3 i386
>
> --
> Francois Chambaud
> http://www.chambaud.org

--

/ Raimo Niskanen, Erlang/OTP, Ericsson AB

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Re: : making man(1) to open a file

Bryan Irvine
<snip>

>
> Another way is:
>
> $ man -f disklabel
> disklabel (5) - disk pack label
> disklabel (8) - read and write disk pack label
> disklabel, readdisklabel, writedisklabel, setdisklabel, bounds_check_with_label (9) - disk label management routines
>
> $ man 8 disklabel
> :

The OP's question though was related to the fact that he had net-snmp
installed which results in 2 man pages for snmpd in the same section:

$ man -k snmpd
snmpd (8) - Simple Network Management Protocol Daemon
snmpd (8) - daemon to respond to SNMP request packets.


Man's default behavior is to stop at the first page it finds in the
path, which would be OpenBSD's snmpd.  man -a (among various other
posted methods) allows you to get access to the the rest of them.

-B