how to install a freeze point version of OpenBSD

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how to install a freeze point version of OpenBSD

Bogdan Andu
Hi,
First, apologies for this question.
I would like to put in production an OpenBSD server but I have no time to wait until May 1stso I have to either use 5.6 -stable or to follow -current.

My question is:

I would like to install 5.7 -current from freeze point which becomes 5.7 -release,but I don't know how to install exactly that version.

Please anybody can explain this to me?

Thanks,
Bogdan

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Re: how to install a freeze point version of OpenBSD

Peter Nicolai Mathias Hansteen
On Wed, Mar 11, 2015 at 07:29:09AM +0000, Bogdan Andu wrote:
> I would like to put in production an OpenBSD server but I have no time to wait until May 1stso I have to either use 5.6 -stable or to follow -current.
>
> My question is:
>
> I would like to install 5.7 -current from freeze point which becomes 5.7 -release,but I don't know how to install exactly that version.
>
> Please anybody can explain this to me?

First, please read http://www.openbsd.org/faq/faq5.html#Flavors

Second, and I think this question turns up often enough that I might take the time to write it up for FAQ inclusion:

There is a short period during every development cycle when the snapshots identify themselves with pure version numbers,
such as "OpenBSD 5.7", without -current, -beta or other suffixes. At some point during that period, you may be able to
download a snapshot that is very similar to what ends up on the release CDs and in the release download directories on
the release day. However, the exact moment the release is built and sent off to production is never revealed to the public,
except perhaps as the file timestamps on the release CDs and in the download directories when they become available.
There is no guarantee that any downloadable snapshot is ever exactly like the release, and the only way you'll know that
a release has indeed been cut is to watch the version string turn into -current again in the most recently available snapshot.

By the time you read this that particular window of opportunity may have closed for all I know.

If you need specific features that will be in 5.7 but are not in 5.6, you can download a snapshot, which will in turn
be superseded soon as development proceeds. If you want 5.7, there is no other option than wait until CD preorders
open and be quick about ordering, as far as anybody knows preorders are served on a first come, first served basis.

- Peter

--
Peter N. M. Hansteen, member of the first RFC 1149 implementation team
http://bsdly.blogspot.com/ http://www.bsdly.net/ http://www.nuug.no/
"Remember to set the evil bit on all malicious network traffic"
delilah spamd[29949]: 85.152.224.147: disconnected after 42673 seconds.

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Re: how to install a freeze point version of OpenBSD

Peter Nicolai Mathias Hansteen
On Wed, Mar 11, 2015 at 08:51:01AM +0000, Bogdan Andu wrote:
> If I install the latest snapshot of 5.7 say April 1st, 2015, I do not think it is possible after May 1st, 2015, to follow patch branch, orelse -stable 5.7, because?? this snapshot it is more advanced than the one frozen to become 5.7 -release unless backports are applied. But even if code is backported it is unclear what percent of the code is covered both at kernel and userland level.

OK, you've managed to demonstrate why I hate answering that particular question. Don't try doing this, please just order a stack of CD sets and be done with it.

In more detail than I should offer, but anyway:

Your timing is way off.

And the chance of finding a snapshot that matches the release *exactly* is minimal to non-existent to start with.

If you're interested in following OpenBSD development fairly closely, please fetch and install snapshots,
then either jump from snapshot to snapshot or try building -current from source.

Trying to guess which snapshot equals the release that will only become available after CD sets have been produced
is a truly counter-productive activity. And unless you're at least willing to install and run snapshots somewhere
for an extended period of time, you're never going to get anywhere close. If doing that fairly minimal amount of
work is beyond you or not an option for some reason, please don't try asking others to point you at the best
moment in the relese cycle. Just wait until CD set preorders open, and hope yours arrive early.

- Peter    

--
Peter N. M. Hansteen, member of the first RFC 1149 implementation team
http://bsdly.blogspot.com/ http://www.bsdly.net/ http://www.nuug.no/
"Remember to set the evil bit on all malicious network traffic"
delilah spamd[29949]: 85.152.224.147: disconnected after 42673 seconds.

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Re: how to install a freeze point version of OpenBSD

Ingo Schwarze
Hi,

Peter N. M. Hansteen wrote on Wed, Mar 11, 2015 at 10:25:33AM +0100:

> And the chance of finding a snapshot that matches the release
> *exactly* is minimal to non-existent to start with.

Even if you manage to find it in snapshots, trying to run -release
before it is released has two considerable downsides that Peter
did not even mention yet:

 1. There are no security and reliability patches before release day,
    and not even notifications.

 2. Even if you manage to find a matching repository of packages
    when installing, that will go away at some unpredictable point
    in time and only reappear on release day in a different place.
    So if you need to add any forgotten packages (or any packages
    that need security fixes) after the packages disappeared but
    before release, you may have no choice but to build from ports
    yourself (and, in the case of security fixes, probably backport
    the patches yourself).

For these two reasons, running -release before release day is
considerably more difficult than running -current.  When, while
running -current, you suspect a security issue or installing a
package from the snapshot mirrors fails due to library version
mismatches, you simply update to the latest snapshot and are done
with it - without even needing to understand whether there was
really a security issue or where the library version mismatch
came from.

Running -release before release day, that won't work, and you are
forced to backport security patches and/or build from ports yourself,
including a precise understanding of library versioning when dealing
with ports.  That's certainly possible (you know, developers do
that all the time), but many people seem to have a tendency to
underestimate the difficulty and/or overestimate their skill levels,
most probably because they are not even aware of some of the issues
involved that require understanding.  Things seem simple when you
are unaware that there is something you need to know...

That said, both of your feet are your own, to shoot or to preserve
unhurt in whichever way you prefer.

Yours,
  Ingo

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Re: how to install a freeze point version of OpenBSD

Peter Nicolai Mathias Hansteen
On Thu, Mar 12, 2015 at 07:41:31AM +0000, Bogdan Andu wrote:
> Thank you for detailed explanations.
> In conclusion is safer to follow -current,
> But if I am using a April 1st snapshot, for example I cannot use
> 5.7 -stable channel to update the tree so I must update the April 1st snapshot to current snapshotin May 1st?
> How it is possible to know when to update my current tree of April 1st to last known -current 5.7, exactly before this becomes 5.8 alfa?

You seem a bit confused about the dates involved (see [1] for a blog post of mine which
may or may not help make things clearer).

if you read up on CVS, you may discover a way to check out code equal to the -release
version or matching a specific point in time. That would give you a set of (hopefully
consistent and buildable) source files, and applying the same tricks to the ports tree
will yield similar results - a set of source files and patches you can build.

For a prebuilt, installable system with matching packages, you need to either go
from snapshot to snapshot (making the dive into -current if you want) or follow
the -release to -stable path.

- P

[1] http://bsdly.blogspot.com/2011/07/what-to-expect-in-openbsd-50-onwards.html
 
--
Peter N. M. Hansteen, member of the first RFC 1149 implementation team
http://bsdly.blogspot.com/ http://www.bsdly.net/ http://www.nuug.no/
"Remember to set the evil bit on all malicious network traffic"
delilah spamd[29949]: 85.152.224.147: disconnected after 42673 seconds.