booting on case sensitive HFS+ on Mac Mini

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booting on case sensitive HFS+ on Mac Mini

Joel Rees
Is booting on a case sensitive HFS+ on Mac Mini supposed to work?

The suggested

     boot hd:,ofwboot /bsd

gets me the message

              can't OPEN: hd:,ofwboot
     Can't open device or file

But

     boot HD:,ofwboot /bsd

gets me some messages I can't read because the open firmware screen
immediately gets overwritten by the gray can't-do-it screen with the
slashed circle, requiring power down by holding the power key down for
five seconds. (At least, I don't know any way to get it to reboot
without powering down. Sure miss the power switch on the keyboard.)

What I've done --

Using Mac OS X's disk utility, I cut five partitions:

     case sensitive HFS+ journaling
     HFS+ with no options
     UNIX file system
     UNIX file system
     UNIX file system

I put Mac OS X 10.4 on the first partition, Classic on the second.
Downloaded and burned the 2.4M cd38.iso installer, set up the fourth
partition as an OpenBSD partition, sliced that partition appropriately,
and tried loading the file sets from a CD burned from an image
formatted as a UNIX file system, but that was a slow way to make a
plastic doily. Rather than try burning a CD from an HFS standard image
(Disk Utility formatted) or just burn directly from the browser, I
moved the file sets to a Linux box and set the Linux box to serve FTP,
then pulled the file sets from the Linux box.

(My first try from the 'net was from iij, and they would only pump a
megabyte every minute and a half or so, so I stopped that and re-booted
to Mac and got the sets from the mirror in Ishikawa after asking my son
if Ishikawa is closer to Osaka than Tokyo. Since I had the sets, I
figured I'd be a good citizen. I did not re-slice before loading the
file sets, but the install script did re-build the file systems in the
slices, if I understand the messages correctly. One thing I found odd
was a thirty+ second pause before each set started transferring, as if
it the install script were re-authenticating with vsftpd on the Linux
box every time. I did a quick ls and df check to see that the file sets
looked like they were there before re-booting and trying to boot from
the hard disk.)

I thought maybe the install CD would give me a boot prompt like it does
on BIOS-based iNTEL, but if it did I missed it.

Not much help from of:

show-devs can't find device
no active package

help? help on  is not available ok

In fact, help on anything seems not to be available.

Looks like the interpreter has been totally stripped of anything
useful. Preparation for the borg?

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Re: booting on case sensitive HFS+ on Mac Mini

Joel Rees
Hmm.

     boot cd:,ofwboot /3.8/macppc/bsd.bin

got errors, of course, but useful errors. And it left me at a boot
prompt. Now if I can just figure out how the internal HD is being
addressed.

Let's see, in Mac OS X,

     nvram -p

shows me

     ...
     boot-volume     3
     ...
     boot-device      pci2/ata-6@D/@0:2,¥¥:tbxi
     ...

Okay, let's try booting the ofwboot on the CD and pointing it to the
hard disk. Four-finger-salute --

     boot cd:,ofwboot

that gets me to the boot prompt. But it gives me this error message:

     open /pci@f4000000/ata-6@d/disk@1//bsd: No such file or directory

And prompts me for the path to bsd . So, I know that the hard disk is
disk@0, and I remember (wrote it down, actually) that I have obsd
loaded in slice 8. Yeah. So I typed in several permutations of the
path, and

     /pci@f4000000/ata-6@d/disk@0/bsd

got me in, where I was able to add the first admin user and reboot to
see if I could remember the path. I couldn't. Actually, I was pretty
sure I typed "/disk@0:8/", but that didn't work the second time, and
"/disk@0/" did.

(Just have to remember to hit '@' as the shift of 2 instead of to the
left of 'P', where it is on the keyboard. And colon is the shift of the
key to the right of 'L'. Love these fancy keyboards that re-arrange
themselves and work perfectly as long as the regular OS is fully booted
and running.)

Now, to see if I can figure out how to tell it to find ofwboot on the
hard drive. ofwboot is on the volume I loaded Mac OS X into, and that
is partition 4, so

     boot hd:4,ofwboot

I really should not hit the enter key so fast, now I have to shutdown
-r now and check it again. /bsd is the default, so it didn't even stop
to ask even though I didn't tell it so.

So I've finally got one of these running. Took me about ten hours, and
it would have only taken two if I could afford the price of the CDs.
(Yeah, I'm still broke. Just a poor programmer, and that's why I'm
broke.) Should I send the dmesg in even though it's a stock Mac Mini?

Sorry to add noise to the list.

On 2006.1.27, at 10:41 AM, Joel Rees wrote:

> Is booting on a case sensitive HFS+ on Mac Mini supposed to work?
>
> The suggested
>
>     boot hd:,ofwboot /bsd
>
> gets me the message
>
>              can't OPEN: hd:,ofwboot
>     Can't open device or file
>
> But
>
>     boot HD:,ofwboot /bsd
>
> gets me some messages I can't read because the open firmware screen
> immediately gets overwritten by the gray can't-do-it screen with the
> slashed circle, requiring power down by holding the power key down for
> five seconds. (At least, I don't know any way to get it to reboot
> without powering down. Sure miss the power switch on the keyboard.)
>
> What I've done --
>
> Using Mac OS X's disk utility, I cut five partitions:
>
>     case sensitive HFS+ journaling
>     HFS+ with no options
>     UNIX file system
>     UNIX file system
>     UNIX file system
>
> I put Mac OS X 10.4 on the first partition, Classic on the second.
> Downloaded and burned the 2.4M cd38.iso installer, set up the fourth
> partition as an OpenBSD partition, sliced that partition
> appropriately, and tried loading the file sets from a CD burned from
> an image formatted as a UNIX file system, but that was a slow way to
> make a plastic doily. Rather than try burning a CD from an HFS
> standard image (Disk Utility formatted) or just burn directly from the
> browser, I moved the file sets to a Linux box and set the Linux box to
> serve FTP, then pulled the file sets from the Linux box.
>
> (My first try from the 'net was from iij, and they would only pump a
> megabyte every minute and a half or so, so I stopped that and
> re-booted to Mac and got the sets from the mirror in Ishikawa after
> asking my son if Ishikawa is closer to Osaka than Tokyo. Since I had
> the sets, I figured I'd be a good citizen. I did not re-slice before
> loading the file sets, but the install script did re-build the file
> systems in the slices, if I understand the messages correctly. One
> thing I found odd was a thirty+ second pause before each set started
> transferring, as if it the install script were re-authenticating with
> vsftpd on the Linux box every time. I did a quick ls and df check to
> see that the file sets looked like they were there before re-booting
> and trying to boot from the hard disk.)
>
> I thought maybe the install CD would give me a boot prompt like it
> does on BIOS-based iNTEL, but if it did I missed it.
>
> Not much help from of:
>
> show-devs can't find device
> no active package
>
> help? help on  is not available ok
>
> In fact, help on anything seems not to be available.
>
> Looks like the interpreter has been totally stripped of anything
> useful. Preparation for the borg?

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Re: booting on case sensitive HFS+ on Mac Mini

Fred Inklaar
Did you check these lines at <http://www.openbsd.org/macppc.html>.
Usually it helps with you just substitute the ide#/ultra# name for
'hd:'. No need to adress PCI cards then.

Here's the snippet from the OpenBSD site:

[begin snippet]

Boot device considerations:

Modern MacPPC systems have two IDE interfaces (called Ultra and IDE),
each of which can have two devices on them (ultra0, ultra1, ide0,
ide1). When multiple drives are present in the system, there are
limitations of which drives can be configured as the OpenBSD root
drive. Invalid configurations will not be able to properly detect which
drive is the root drive, so any attempt will either prompt for a root
drive or fail.

    * ultra0 is always a valid root drive.
    * ultra1 is valid as a root disk, as long as ultra0 is a hard
drive, not a non-hard disk ATAPI device).
    * ide1 (Zip drive bay) is valid as a root disk if no hard drive is
located at ultra1,
    * ide0 (cdrom) is valid as a root drive only if no hard drives are
connected to the Ultra bus.

[end snippet]

Besides, the bboot hd:,ofwboot /bsdb will only let you boot an
installed system. I guess you will need bboot hd:,ofwboot /bsd.rdb to
boot installation media. (I just found out the hard way that there's a
big difference between the two - booted into the installation media
when I wanted to boot the system, and wiped my disk. Great for
learning, lousy for morale).

Fred.

Op Fri, 27 Jan 2006 12:25:00 +0900 schreef Joel Rees:

> Hmm.
>
>     boot cd:,ofwboot /3.8/macppc/bsd.bin
>
> got errors, of course, but useful errors. And it left me at a boot
> prompt. Now if I can just figure out how the internal HD is being
> addressed.
>
> Let's see, in Mac OS X,
>
>     nvram -p
>
> shows me
>
>     ...
>     boot-volume     3
>     ...
>     boot-device      pci2/ata-6@D/@0:2,B%B%:tbxi
>     ...
>
> Okay, let's try booting the ofwboot on the CD and pointing it to the
> hard disk. Four-finger-salute --
>
>     boot cd:,ofwboot
>
> that gets me to the boot prompt. But it gives me this error message:
>
>     open /pci@f4000000/ata-6@d/disk@1//bsd: No such file or directory
>
> And prompts me for the path to bsd . So, I know that the hard disk is
> disk@0, and I remember (wrote it down, actually) that I have obsd
> loaded in slice 8. Yeah. So I typed in several permutations of the
> path, and
>
>     /pci@f4000000/ata-6@d/disk@0/bsd
>
> got me in, where I was able to add the first admin user and reboot to
> see if I could remember the path. I couldn't. Actually, I was pretty
> sure I typed "/disk@0:8/", but that didn't work the second time, and
> "/disk@0/" did.
>
> (Just have to remember to hit '@' as the shift of 2 instead of to the
> left of 'P', where it is on the keyboard. And colon is the shift of
> the key to the right of 'L'. Love these fancy keyboards that
> re-arrange themselves and work perfectly as long as the regular OS is
> fully booted and running.)
>
> Now, to see if I can figure out how to tell it to find ofwboot on the
> hard drive. ofwboot is on the volume I loaded Mac OS X into, and that
> is partition 4, so
>
>     boot hd:4,ofwboot
>
> I really should not hit the enter key so fast, now I have to shutdown
> -r now and check it again. /bsd is the default, so it didn't even
> stop to ask even though I didn't tell it so.
>
> So I've finally got one of these running. Took me about ten hours,
> and it would have only taken two if I could afford the price of the
> CDs. (Yeah, I'm still broke. Just a poor programmer, and that's why
> I'm broke.) Should I send the dmesg in even though it's a stock Mac
> Mini?
>
> Sorry to add noise to the list.
>
> On 2006.1.27, at 10:41 AM, Joel Rees wrote:
>
>> Is booting on a case sensitive HFS+ on Mac Mini supposed to work?
>>
>> The suggested
>>
>>     boot hd:,ofwboot /bsd
>>
>> gets me the message
>>
>>              can't OPEN: hd:,ofwboot
>>     Can't open device or file
>>
>> But
>>
>>     boot HD:,ofwboot /bsd
>>
>> gets me some messages I can't read because the open firmware screen
>> immediately gets overwritten by the gray can't-do-it screen with the
>> slashed circle, requiring power down by holding the power key down
>> for five seconds. (At least, I don't know any way to get it to
>> reboot without powering down. Sure miss the power switch on the
>> keyboard.)
>>
>> What I've done --
>>
>> Using Mac OS X's disk utility, I cut five partitions:
>>
>>     case sensitive HFS+ journaling
>>     HFS+ with no options
>>     UNIX file system
>>     UNIX file system
>>     UNIX file system
>>
>> I put Mac OS X 10.4 on the first partition, Classic on the second.
>> Downloaded and burned the 2.4M cd38.iso installer, set up the fourth
>> partition as an OpenBSD partition, sliced that partition
>> appropriately, and tried loading the file sets from a CD burned from
>> an image formatted as a UNIX file system, but that was a slow way to
>> make a plastic doily. Rather than try burning a CD from an HFS
>> standard image (Disk Utility formatted) or just burn directly from
>> the browser, I moved the file sets to a Linux box and set the Linux
>> box to serve FTP, then pulled the file sets from the Linux box.
>>
>> (My first try from the 'net was from iij, and they would only pump a
>> megabyte every minute and a half or so, so I stopped that and
>> re-booted to Mac and got the sets from the mirror in Ishikawa after
>> asking my son if Ishikawa is closer to Osaka than Tokyo. Since I had
>> the sets, I figured I'd be a good citizen. I did not re-slice before
>> loading the file sets, but the install script did re-build the file
>> systems in the slices, if I understand the messages correctly. One
>> thing I found odd was a thirty+ second pause before each set started
>> transferring, as if it the install script were re-authenticating
>> with vsftpd on the Linux box every time. I did a quick ls and df
>> check to see that the file sets looked like they were there before
>> re-booting and trying to boot from the hard disk.)
>>
>> I thought maybe the install CD would give me a boot prompt like it
>> does on BIOS-based iNTEL, but if it did I missed it.
>>
>> Not much help from of:
>>
>> show-devs can't find device
>> no active package
>>
>> help? help on  is not available ok
>>
>> In fact, help on anything seems not to be available.
>>
>> Looks like the interpreter has been totally stripped of anything
>> useful. Preparation for the borg?

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Re: booting on case sensitive HFS+ on Mac Mini

Joel Rees
On 2006.1.31, at 06:16 AM, Fred Inklaar wrote:

> Did you check these lines at <http://www.openbsd.org/macppc.html>.

Yeah, if I hadn't read those before, trying to boot a dysfunctional
biege G3 desktop, I don't think I'd have been able to decode the error
messages. This time it made sense, partly, I'm sure, because the
hardware worked. (I know for myself why the biege G3 is listed as
unknown. heh.)

But, yeah, the /ultra0 abbreviation should have worked, and does now
that it has been booted once. So does the hd abbreviation. But for some
reason, it didn't seem to work until I had booted once, so I'm just
going to try to remember that it looks like you sometimes have to
specify the full absolute path, including the address of the PCI card,
to start with.

It's a lot of typing, but when the hardware works, it's not such a big
deal to type it several times.

(In the case of the biege G3, I shall never know whether it was the bad
hardware or my fingers missing the syntax. And I don't think I shall
care. The biege G3 is too power hungry for what it can do in obsd. For
letting the kids play games, or for running old versions of the
Metrowerks compiler, it's probably still useful. It's even somewhat
useful with Mac OS X, although that particular box had a video that
tended to die after a couple of hours running Mac OS X.)