What does the "#n" after "GENERIC.MP" stand for?

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What does the "#n" after "GENERIC.MP" stand for?

Ottavio Caruso
Hi,

Out of curiosity:

~$ uname -r
6.6
~$ uname -v
GENERIC.MP#0
~$ sysctl kern.osversion
kern.osversion=GENERIC.MP#0

This was GENERIC.MP#7 before I ran syspatch and rebooted.

I can't find a reference to this notation. I thought it could have
been the patch version number, but it's obviously not so. Looking on:
https://dmesgd.nycbug.org/index.cgi?do=index&fts=OpenBSD

it appears machines running -current have a higher #number.

--
Ottavio Caruso

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Re: What does the "#n" after "GENERIC.MP" stand for?

Andinus

Ottavio Caruso @ 2020-06-28 18:26 IST:

> ~$ uname -v
> GENERIC.MP#0
> ~$ sysctl kern.osversion
> kern.osversion=GENERIC.MP#0

Might be version number? I mean you are looking at `kern.osversion' &
there's only `#0' that can represent version.

> This was GENERIC.MP#7 before I ran syspatch and rebooted.
>
> I can't find a reference to this notation. I thought it could have
> been the patch version number, but it's obviously not so. Looking on:
> https://dmesgd.nycbug.org/index.cgi?do=index&fts=OpenBSD
>
> it appears machines running -current have a higher #number.

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Re: What does the "#n" after "GENERIC.MP" stand for?

Stuart Henderson
In reply to this post by Ottavio Caruso
On 2020-06-28, Ottavio Caruso <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Hi,
>
> Out of curiosity:
>
> ~$ uname -r
> 6.6
> ~$ uname -v
> GENERIC.MP#0
> ~$ sysctl kern.osversion
> kern.osversion=GENERIC.MP#0
>
> This was GENERIC.MP#7 before I ran syspatch and rebooted.
>
> I can't find a reference to this notation. I thought it could have
> been the patch version number, but it's obviously not so. Looking on:
> https://dmesgd.nycbug.org/index.cgi?do=index&fts=OpenBSD
>
> it appears machines running -current have a higher #number.
>

It is the number of kernel builds that were done in same directory.
Sometimes this is wiped between builds (if build options changed etc,
or some other cases), other times it is just rebuilt in the same dir
so you can't draw much meaning from the value.