TNC Packet Radio for OpenBSD

classic Classic list List threaded Threaded
9 messages Options
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

TNC Packet Radio for OpenBSD

Dan Colish-2
I just got a radio for my car and it is capable to handling TNC
tranceiver traffic. So, now I'm on a search for a decent packet radio,
but it looks like the only ones I've found are Windows only. It not
as concerned with the software as I am with the HW being detected
correctly, although having both work with be nice. Any suggestions are
welcome.

Thanks
Dan
N2VQV

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: TNC Packet Radio for OpenBSD

Marc Balmer-2
Am 24.02.2009 um 16:23 schrieb Dan Colish:

> I just got a radio for my car and it is capable to handling TNC
> tranceiver traffic. So, now I'm on a search for a decent packet radio,
> but it looks like the only ones I've found are Windows only. It not
> as concerned with the software as I am with the HW being detected
> correctly, although having both work with be nice. Any suggestions are
> welcome.

A decent TNC uses a serial port or USB, I am using such a thingie
and it works nicely.

OpenBSD does not directly support AX.25.

>
>
> Thanks
> Dan
> N2VQV
>

Marc
HB9SSB

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: TNC Packet Radio for OpenBSD

Dan Colish-2
On Tue, Feb 24, 2009 at 05:50:55PM +0100, Marc Balmer wrote:

>
> Am 24.02.2009 um 16:23 schrieb Dan Colish:
>
>> I just got a radio for my car and it is capable to handling TNC
>> tranceiver traffic. So, now I'm on a search for a decent packet radio,
>> but it looks like the only ones I've found are Windows only. It not
>> as concerned with the software as I am with the HW being detected
>> correctly, although having both work with be nice. Any suggestions are
>> welcome.
>
> A decent TNC uses a serial port or USB, I am using such a thingie
> and it works nicely.
>
> OpenBSD does not directly support AX.25.
>
>>
>>
>> Thanks
>> Dan
>> N2VQV
>>
>
> Marc
> HB9SSB
>

Marc,

  Thanks for the tips. I've been checking out a varity of tncs that are
  available online. The choices seem endless. What particular model do
  you use?

Dan

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: TNC Packet Radio for OpenBSD

Marc Balmer-2
Am 24.02.2009 um 19:41 schrieb Dan Colish:

>
> On Tue, Feb 24, 2009 at 05:50:55PM +0100, Marc Balmer wrote:
>>
>> Am 24.02.2009 um 16:23 schrieb Dan Colish:
>>
>>> I just got a radio for my car and it is capable to handling TNC
>>> tranceiver traffic. So, now I'm on a search for a decent packet  
>>> radio,
>>> but it looks like the only ones I've found are Windows only. It not
>>> as concerned with the software as I am with the HW being detected
>>> correctly, although having both work with be nice. Any suggestions  
>>> are
>>> welcome.
>>
>> A decent TNC uses a serial port or USB, I am using such a thingie
>> and it works nicely.
>>
>> OpenBSD does not directly support AX.25.
>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Thanks
>>> Dan
>>> N2VQV
>>>
>>
>> Marc
>> HB9SSB
>>
>
> Marc,
>
>  Thanks for the tips. I've been checking out a varity of tncs that are
>  available online. The choices seem endless. What particular model do
>  you use?

I am using a TNC7multi.  http://nt-g.de/de/tnc7multi/tnc7multi.php5

>
> Dan

0x49,
Marc

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: TNC Packet Radio for OpenBSD

Joseph C. Bender
Marc Balmer wrote:
>
> I am using a TNC7multi.  http://nt-g.de/de/tnc7multi/tnc7multi.php5
>

The venerable KPC-3 from Kantronics is always a good choice as well.

http://www.kantronics.com/products/kpc3.html


--
Joseph Bender
N8XRE

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: TNC Packet Radio for OpenBSD

ropers
2009/2/25 Joseph C. Bender <[hidden email]>:
> Marc Balmer wrote:
>>
>> I am using a TNC7multi.  http://nt-g.de/de/tnc7multi/tnc7multi.php5
>>
>
> The venerable KPC-3 from Kantronics is always a good choice as well.
>
> http://www.kantronics.com/products/kpc3.html

Apologies if this is very naive and thoroughly uninformed (it is) and
possibly stupid, but seeing this on the above page --

> Data Rate (radio port) 1200 bps (default); 300, 400, 600

-- do these TNCs offer the same data transmission speeds that people
used to get with early generation modems and acoustic couplers way
back when? So what are people using TNCs for, then? What data are you
actually exchanging this way? What are the modern-day practical
applications of this technology? You're probably not using this to
download install44.iso...

regards,
--ropers

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: TNC Packet Radio for OpenBSD

Marc Balmer-2
Am 26.02.2009 um 00:27 schrieb ropers:

> 2009/2/25 Joseph C. Bender <[hidden email]>:
>> Marc Balmer wrote:
>>>
>>> I am using a TNC7multi.  http://nt-g.de/de/tnc7multi/tnc7multi.php5
>>>
>>
>> The venerable KPC-3 from Kantronics is always a good choice as well.
>>
>> http://www.kantronics.com/products/kpc3.html
>
> Apologies if this is very naive and thoroughly uninformed (it is) and
> possibly stupid, but seeing this on the above page --
>
>> Data Rate (radio port) 1200 bps (default); 300, 400, 600
>
> -- do these TNCs offer the same data transmission speeds that people
> used to get with early generation modems and acoustic couplers way
> back when? So what are people using TNCs for, then? What data are you
> actually exchanging this way? What are the modern-day practical
> applications of this technology? You're probably not using this to
> download install44.iso...

Yes.  The normal speed for packet radio over UHF/SHV is 1200 or 9600
bps, over HF usually 300 bps.

Heck, a very popular tranmission technique on HF, PSK31, uses 31 bps.

Maybe you should google a bit a see what TNCs are used for ;)

>
> regards,
> --ropers

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: TNC Packet Radio for OpenBSD

Douglas A. Tutty-2
On Thu, Feb 26, 2009 at 08:09:44AM +0100, Marc Balmer wrote:
 
> Yes.  The normal speed for packet radio over UHF/SHV is 1200 or 9600
> bps, over HF usually 300 bps.
>
> Heck, a very popular tranmission technique on HF, PSK31, uses 31 bps.

Thats what, about the same speed as manual-key morse?

Doug.

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

[OT] Re: TNC Packet Radio for OpenBSD

ropers
In reply to this post by Marc Balmer-2
2009/2/26 Marc Balmer <[hidden email]>:

>
> Am 26.02.2009 um 00:27 schrieb ropers:
>
>> 2009/2/25 Joseph C. Bender <[hidden email]>:
>>>
>>> Marc Balmer wrote:
>>>>
>>>> I am using a TNC7multi.  http://nt-g.de/de/tnc7multi/tnc7multi.php5
>>>>
>>>
>>> The venerable KPC-3 from Kantronics is always a good choice as well.
>>>
>>> http://www.kantronics.com/products/kpc3.html
>>
>> Apologies if this is very naive and thoroughly uninformed (it is) and
>> possibly stupid, but seeing this on the above page --
>>
>>> Data Rate (radio port)   1200 bps (default); 300, 400, 600
>>
>> -- do these TNCs offer the same data transmission speeds that people
>> used to get with early generation modems and acoustic couplers way
>> back when? So what are people using TNCs for, then? What data are you
>> actually exchanging this way? What are the modern-day practical
>> applications of this technology? You're probably not using this to
>> download install44.iso...
>
> Yes.  The normal speed for packet radio over UHF/SHV is 1200 or 9600
> bps, over HF usually 300 bps.
>
> Heck, a very popular tranmission technique on HF, PSK31, uses 31 bps.
>
> Maybe you should google a bit a see what TNCs are used for ;)

My googling wasn't very successful (didn't use the right search terms,
probably), but I found this at kantronics.com:
http://www.kantronics.com/applications.html

So if I get this right, then the advantages of communicating with a
TNC via packet radio over cellular communications are lower cost and
wider reach and coverage, and the advantages over sending the data via
Iridium/satellite are much lower cost. Also, and correct me if I'm
wrong, isn't it true that there are some regions even satellites don't
reach? Maybe Antarctica? Presumably TNC packet radio could be used
with longwave or medium wave and cover even such remote parts of the
globe from very far away?

I also gather that the combination of TNC packet radio with GPS
equipment for instantly and continuously and cheaply available real
time location data to let remote servers know just where you're at is
a popular application?

Don't feel pressed to answer unless you feel like it; I'm just
wondering aloud; though if anyone would love to elaborate, that would
be more than welcome.

Thanks and kind regards,
--ropers