Static webpages with OpenBSD - success stories

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Static webpages with OpenBSD - success stories

Paolo Aglialoro
Hello,

yesterday I've been at an interesting presentation of pelican (it was a
git+pelican+fabric gramework), in order to create static websites and I
very much appreciated the topic. I had also recently had a look at jekill
(which looks kinda promising), but discovered that there is a whole "world"
of static site generators described at the page
https://staticsitegenerators.net/ among which some look also interesting to
me in case of customizations because just based on shell scripts and not on
python/java/perl/etc in which I am not fluent: I am starting from the basic
bashblog to more complex like rawk, baker, simsalabash.

After a quick peek on openports I have seen pelican present, but couldn't
identify more. On hugo webpage there's a package for OpenBSD
https://github.com/spf13/hugo/releases

Did you have success experiences with them or similar products on OpenBSD
(e.g. octopress, jekyll, etc)? What would you advice to build a static site
which should sport light but sexy template (e.g. scroll effects), multiple
pages, pictures and some media links (like embedded youtube videos, for
instance)? Use of googleforms would be a bonus.

Also, on source language: although being asciidoc present in OpenBSD,
markdown seems at the moment the "industry standard". In ports, besides
python version of markdown, I've found a really interesting C port of it,
named "discount". Do you have had any previous experience with it and would
you suggest it instead of plain python version?

Thanks

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Re: Static webpages with OpenBSD - success stories

Rick Hanson
On Tue, May 17, 2016 at 9:13 AM, Paolo Aglialoro <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Hello,

Hi!

> yesterday I've been at an interesting presentation of pelican (it was a
> git+pelican+fabric gramework), in order to create static websites and I
> very much appreciated the topic. I had also recently had a look at jekill
> (which looks kinda promising), but discovered that there is a whole "world"
> of static site generators described at the page
> https://staticsitegenerators.net/ among which some look also interesting to
> me in case of customizations because just based on shell scripts and not on
> python/java/perl/etc in which I am not fluent: I am starting from the basic
> bashblog to more complex like rawk, baker, simsalabash.
>
> After a quick peek on openports I have seen pelican present, but couldn't
> identify more. On hugo webpage there's a package for OpenBSD
> https://github.com/spf13/hugo/releases
>
> Did you have success experiences with them or similar products on OpenBSD
> (e.g. octopress, jekyll, etc)? What would you advice to build a static site
> which should sport light but sexy template (e.g. scroll effects), multiple
> pages, pictures and some media links (like embedded youtube videos, for
> instance)? Use of googleforms would be a bonus.

I've had great success with this: https://github.com/nuex/zodiac.
It's on the list you mentioned.  You can build whatever you want on
top of it because it's so simple and hackable.

> Also, on source language: although being asciidoc present in OpenBSD,
> markdown seems at the moment the "industry standard". In ports, besides
> python version of markdown, I've found a really interesting C port of it,
> named "discount". Do you have had any previous experience with it and would
> you suggest it instead of plain python version?

Yes. I use discount with zodiac (mentioned above). It's great and has
a nice build system. You can build it out-of-the-box on OpenBSD (i.e.
no GNUisms).

> Thanks
>

Have fun!

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Re: Static webpages with OpenBSD - success stories

attila
In reply to this post by Paolo Aglialoro
Paolo Aglialoro <[hidden email]> writes:

> Hello,
>
> yesterday I've been at an interesting presentation of pelican (it was a
> git+pelican+fabric gramework), in order to create static websites and I
> very much appreciated the topic. I had also recently had a look at jekill
> (which looks kinda promising), but discovered that there is a whole "world"
> of static site generators described at the page
> https://staticsitegenerators.net/ among which some look also interesting to
> me in case of customizations because just based on shell scripts and not on
> python/java/perl/etc in which I am not fluent: I am starting from the basic
> bashblog to more complex like rawk, baker, simsalabash.
>
> After a quick peek on openports I have seen pelican present, but couldn't
> identify more. On hugo webpage there's a package for OpenBSD
> https://github.com/spf13/hugo/releases
>
> Did you have success experiences with them or similar products on OpenBSD
> (e.g. octopress, jekyll, etc)? What would you advice to build a static site
> which should sport light but sexy template (e.g. scroll effects), multiple
> pages, pictures and some media links (like embedded youtube videos, for
> instance)? Use of googleforms would be a bonus.
>
> Also, on source language: although being asciidoc present in OpenBSD,
> markdown seems at the moment the "industry standard". In ports, besides
> python version of markdown, I've found a really interesting C port of it,
> named "discount". Do you have had any previous experience with it and would
> you suggest it instead of plain python version?

FWIW, textproc/multimarkdown is pretty nice for static sites.
https://torbsd.github.io is done in multimarkdown with a simple
Makefile and some CSS.  I also use multimarkdown to generate PDFs, via
dblatex - always looks nice (but maybe I'm easier to please than you
:-).  Multimarkdown's simple extensions to markdown are all useful, no
fluff.

>
> Thanks

Pax, -A
--
http://haqistan.net/~attila | [hidden email] | 0x62A729CF

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Re: Static webpages with OpenBSD - success stories

Carson Chittom-3
In reply to this post by Paolo Aglialoro
Paolo Aglialoro <[hidden email]> writes:

> After a quick peek on openports I have seen pelican present, but couldn't
> identify more. On hugo webpage there's a package for OpenBSD
> https://github.com/spf13/hugo/releases

I just this week started using Pelican, largely because it *is* in
ports.  There seem to be a lot of themes available for it on Github, but
I haven't tried doing anything with them.  It works well, and the
Makefile you get out of its "initialize site directory" script covers
most use cases I could think of.  

The only caveat off the top of my head is that if you use the
autogenerated Makefile in your site's directory, you'll need gmake since
there are apparently some GNUisms.  I already had gmake installed, so I
didn't bother rewriting the Makefile.

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Re: Static webpages with OpenBSD - success stories

Predrag Punosevac-2
In reply to this post by Paolo Aglialoro
OpenBSD is shipped with the static webpage generator (sort of). It is
called mandoc. man mandoc and check out -T html switch. If you ask me
this

http://mdocml.bsd.lv/

and

this

http://manpages.bsd.lv/history.html

are pretty darn good looking static websites. They are generated with
mandoc.

Cheers,
Predrag

P.S. Another almost orthogonal idea is to pick a Free CSS Template

http://www.free-css.com/free-css-templates/page1

and just quickly hack AWK  or Perl code which helps you update the
content (I have done that in the past using AWK).

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Re: Static webpages with OpenBSD - success stories

Ingo Schwarze
Hi Predrag,

Predrag Punosevac wrote on Tue, May 17, 2016 at 06:59:15PM -0400:

> OpenBSD is shipped with the static webpage generator (sort of).
> It is called mandoc.  man mandoc and check out -T html switch.

That one is a bit specialized: for manual pages.  =:c)

True, i once heard of one developer who used it for creating a small
static website that had nothing to do with manuals.  But i must
admit it's not really intended as a general-purpose tool.

> If you ask me this
>   http://mdocml.bsd.lv/
> and this
>   http://manpages.bsd.lv/history.html
> are pretty darn good looking static websites.
> They are generated with mandoc.

Sorry, no, they aren't, they were written by hand, mostly by Kristaps.
They are merely using a stylesheet that slightly resembles the
mandoc.css stylesheet.

But here are a few static webpages generated by mandoc(1) -Thtml:

  http://mdocml.bsd.lv/man/

Basically, all the links of the form "name(section)" on that
page, and on the pages you can reach from there.

Ironically, the same pages on

  http://man.openbsd.org/

are not statically pregenerated, but dynamically generated
on demand.  But the user will hardly care.

Yours,
  Ingo

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Re: Static webpages with OpenBSD - success stories

lists-2
Wed, 18 May 2016 01:34:24 +0200 Ingo Schwarze <[hidden email]>
> Hi Predrag,
>
> Predrag Punosevac wrote on Tue, May 17, 2016 at 06:59:15PM -0400:
>
> > OpenBSD is shipped with the static webpage generator (sort of).
> > It is called mandoc.  man mandoc and check out -T html switch.  

Not in the sense web site publishers understand it, without mid layer.

> That one is a bit specialized: for manual pages.  =:c)

Because the main application directs semantics derivation from many
years of improvements.  This is why slapping an extra application
results in mere rarely used features or rather changes that deviate
and possibly interfere with the main original semantics application.

> True, i once heard of one developer who used it for creating a small
> static website that had nothing to do with manuals.  But i must
> admit it's not really intended as a general-purpose tool.

But there are exports from mandoc(1) that look stunningly beautiful.

mandoc - format and display UNIX manuals: Output Formats
[http://man.openbsd.org/OpenBSD-current/man1/mandoc.1#Output_Formats]

Check the -T option with html and pdf output, this is incredibly good.

mandoc_char - mandoc special characters
[http://man.openbsd.org/OpenBSD-current/man7/mandoc_char.7]

NB: I think http://man.openbsd.org/mandoc ought to work, magic touch?

Would be nice to see how people make it work for them anyway still ;-)

> > If you ask me this
> >   http://mdocml.bsd.lv/
> > and this
> >   http://manpages.bsd.lv/history.html
> > are pretty darn good looking static websites.
> > They are generated with mandoc.  
>
> Sorry, no, they aren't, they were written by hand, mostly by Kristaps.
> They are merely using a stylesheet that slightly resembles the
> mandoc.css stylesheet.
>
> But here are a few static webpages generated by mandoc(1) -Thtml:
>
>   http://mdocml.bsd.lv/man/
>
> Basically, all the links of the form "name(section)" on that
> page, and on the pages you can reach from there.
>
> Ironically, the same pages on
>
>   http://man.openbsd.org/
>
> are not statically pregenerated, but dynamically generated
> on demand.  But the user will hardly care.
>
> Yours,
>   Ingo

Thanks for bringing this up, hopefully someday org-mode
[http://orgmode.org/] gets an output export for mandoc.

Org-mode manual - Exporting
[http://orgmode.org/manual/Exporting.html]

P.S. Does Emacs have a well functioning mandoc mode, or similar?