Secure by default

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Secure by default

sivasubramanian muthusamy
Hello,

I am an ordinary computer user, installed 6.8 without connecting to
the Internet yet, (a friend and a technical expert recently advised me
in a different context: do not expose your machine to the Internet-
don't know what that means)

OpenBSD intro says OpenBSD is secure by default. How is it secure by
default for an average user who does not get to ssh, does not use his
computer as a web-server or as a VM host, who does not have to share
screen etc? What ports are open by default and what applications start
by default?

Before connecting the computer to the Internet, what other steps
should a very ordinary user take? Block a few more ports? Which ones?

Thank you.

Sivasubramanian M

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Re: Secure by default

Mohamed Aslan
How's is this related to tech@?

On Sun, Feb 14, 2021 at 12:44:00AM +0530, sivasubramanian muthusamy wrote:

> Hello,
>
> I am an ordinary computer user, installed 6.8 without connecting to
> the Internet yet, (a friend and a technical expert recently advised me
> in a different context: do not expose your machine to the Internet-
> don't know what that means)
>
> OpenBSD intro says OpenBSD is secure by default. How is it secure by
> default for an average user who does not get to ssh, does not use his
> computer as a web-server or as a VM host, who does not have to share
> screen etc? What ports are open by default and what applications start
> by default?
>
> Before connecting the computer to the Internet, what other steps
> should a very ordinary user take? Block a few more ports? Which ones?
>
> Thank you.
>
> Sivasubramanian M
>

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Re: Secure by default

sivasubramanian muthusamy
In reply to this post by sivasubramanian muthusamy
Dear Flint,

During installation I didn't connect the network, but after installation,
Yes. What would I do with a Computer that isn't connected?  My use case is
all about Internet :)


On Sun, Feb 14, 2021, 02:49 flint pyrite <[hidden email]> wrote:

> I am not sure about your use case but to myself, my computer is useless
> these days without a connection.
>
>
> On Sat, Feb 13, 2021 at 1:15 PM sivasubramanian muthusamy <
> [hidden email]> wrote:
>
>> Hello,
>>
>> I am an ordinary computer user, installed 6.8 without connecting to
>> the Internet yet, (a friend and a technical expert recently advised me
>> in a different context: do not expose your machine to the Internet-
>> don't know what that means)
>>
>> OpenBSD intro says OpenBSD is secure by default. How is it secure by
>> default for an average user who does not get to ssh, does not use his
>> computer as a web-server or as a VM host, who does not have to share
>> screen etc? What ports are open by default and what applications start
>> by default?
>>
>> Before connecting the computer to the Internet, what other steps
>> should a very ordinary user take? Block a few more ports? Which ones?
>>
>> Thank you.
>>
>> Sivasubramanian M
>>
>>
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Re: Secure by default

Stuart Henderson
On 2021/02/19 20:27, sivasubramanian muthusamy wrote:
> Dear Flint,
>
> During installation I didn't connect the network, but after installation,
> Yes. What would I do with a Computer that isn't connected?  My use case is
> all about Internet :)

Other use cases are available.

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Re: Secure by default

sivasubramanian muthusamy
Dear Stuart Henderson,

On Fri, Feb 19, 2021 at 8:42 PM Stuart Henderson <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> On 2021/02/19 20:27, sivasubramanian muthusamy wrote:
> > Dear Flint,
> >
> > During installation I didn't connect the network, but after installation,
> > Yes. What would I do with a Computer that isn't connected?  My use case is
> > all about Internet :)
>
> Other use cases are available.

Could you elaborate?  Thank you.
>