Running OpenBSD on Raspberry Pi

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Re: Running OpenBSD on Raspberry Pi

Maxim Bourmistrov-5
USB2-to-RJ45 can not be a high perf. solution.
As for an arcade-box and siri proxy - sure it handles what is should.

Is "OpenBSD on RaspPi" yet another port to get abandoned in near future?(If this port will be done)
Is it worth to put a manpower on it?

As far as I know(and I know a little) there is high-end x86-based hw just waiting for the right man
with time to step in and get its drivers fixed.

And I'm not even talking about "soon to be materialized" ARM-based server machines in pipe…..

//mxb

On 31 dec 2012, at 11:56, Brad Smith <[hidden email]> wrote:

> ----- Original message -----
>> Because I don't see it handle pressure…..
>>
>> Sure arcade and siri proxy are fun, but x86-based hw for those same
>> tasks is probably out there….
>
> You're making assumptions without knowing what the user is doing with the hardware.
>
> --
> This message has been scanned for viruses and
> dangerous content by MailScanner, and is
> believed to be clean.

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Re: Running OpenBSD on Raspberry Pi

Loïc Blot-2
It's a shame not to port OpenBSD on a Raspberry PI. I would like to a
make a cheap firewall router box at home with this.
The network card and the CPU is as better as an ISP box but it's more
flexible.
That's the cheapest solution for homing firewall, and we can add an USB
wireless tool to get WiFi working with Raspberry, and add some boxes
functionnalities like NFS shares, with the other USB plug.


--
Cordialement,
Loïc BLOT, UNIX systems, security and network expert
http://www.unix-experience.fr 

Le lundi 31 décembre 2012 à 12:16 +0100, mxb a écrit :

> USB2-to-RJ45 can not be a high perf. solution.
> As for an arcade-box and siri proxy - sure it handles what is should.
>
> Is "OpenBSD on RaspPi" yet another port to get abandoned in near future?(If this port will be done)
> Is it worth to put a manpower on it?
>
> As far as I know(and I know a little) there is high-end x86-based hw just waiting for the right man
> with time to step in and get its drivers fixed.
>
> And I'm not even talking about "soon to be materialized" ARM-based server machines in pipe…..
>
> //mxb
>
> On 31 dec 2012, at 11:56, Brad Smith <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> > ----- Original message -----
> >> Because I don't see it handle pressure…..
> >>
> >> Sure arcade and siri proxy are fun, but x86-based hw for those same
> >> tasks is probably out there….
> >
> > You're making assumptions without knowing what the user is doing with the hardware.
> >
> > --
> > This message has been scanned for viruses and
> > dangerous content by MailScanner, and is
> > believed to be clean.

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Re: Running OpenBSD on Raspberry Pi

Francois Pussault-2
So just do it for all other users :)
doing this should take a lot of times to developpers & maintainers.

So If you need it but don't know programming, you can manage a team that will code.

> ----------------------------------------
> From: Loïc BLOT <[hidden email]>
> Sent: Mon Dec 31 13:45:14 CET 2012
> To: <[hidden email]>
> Subject: Re: Running OpenBSD on Raspberry Pi
>
>
> It's a shame not to port OpenBSD on a Raspberry PI. I would like to a
> make a cheap firewall router box at home with this.
> The network card and the CPU is as better as an ISP box but it's more
> flexible.
> That's the cheapest solution for homing firewall, and we can add an USB
> wireless tool to get WiFi working with Raspberry, and add some boxes
> functionnalities like NFS shares, with the other USB plug.
>
>
> --
> Cordialement,
> Loïc BLOT, UNIX systems, security and network expert
> http://www.unix-experience.fr 
>
> Le lundi 31 décembre 2012 à 12:16 +0100, mxb a écrit :
>
> > USB2-to-RJ45 can not be a high perf. solution.
> > As for an arcade-box and siri proxy - sure it handles what is should.
> >
> > Is "OpenBSD on RaspPi" yet another port to get abandoned in near future?(If this port will be done)
> > Is it worth to put a manpower on it?
> >
> > As far as I know(and I know a little) there is high-end x86-based hw just waiting for the right man
> > with time to step in and get its drivers fixed.
> >
> > And I'm not even talking about "soon to be materialized" ARM-based server machines in pipe…..
> >
> > //mxb
> >
> > On 31 dec 2012, at 11:56, Brad Smith <[hidden email]> wrote:
> >
> > > ----- Original message -----
> > >> Because I don't see it handle pressure…..
> > >>
> > >> Sure arcade and siri proxy are fun, but x86-based hw for those same
> > >> tasks is probably out there….
> > >
> > > You're making assumptions without knowing what the user is doing with the hardware.
> > >
> > > --
> > > This message has been scanned for viruses and
> > > dangerous content by MailScanner, and is
> > > believed to be clean.
>


Cordialement
Francois Pussault
3701 - 8 rue Marcel Pagnol
31100 Toulouse 
France 
+33 6 17 230 820   +33 5 34 365 269
[hidden email]

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Re: Running OpenBSD on Raspberry Pi

BARDOU Pierre
In reply to this post by Doug Brewer
Hello,

I would be very interested by an OpenBSD port too.
Usage : home router with firewall, DNS and DHCP.

I am looking into FreeBSD and NetBSD ports, but I would prefer to have the latest PF and OpenSSH versions... plus I am more used to OpenBSD and I like using it :-)

If somebody knows X86 hardware able to do the same (routing/firewlling 20 mbps traffic, VLAN, fits in a tiny box, power consumption below 5W, price around 50$) as the raspberry I am interested BTW.

--
Cordialement,
Pierre BARDOU


-----Message d'origine-----
De : Doug Brewer [mailto:[hidden email]]
Envoyé : lundi 31 décembre 2012 09:39
À : KarlOskar Rikås; [hidden email]
Objet : Re: Running OpenBSD on Raspberry Pi

On Mon, Dec 31, 2012 at 12:13 AM, Tobias Ulmer  wrote:

> On Sun, Dec 30, 2012 at 05:01:23PM +0100, KarlOskar Rikås wrote:
>> Hi, I wonder if it's possible to run OpenBSD on Raspberry Pi.
>>
>> Is there any image ready for putting on my SD card and boot up? If
>> not, is there any manual or guide how to make one?
>
> No it's not possible and there are no plans to change that. Search the
> archives if you're interested in the reasons.
>
> In short, there is plenty of better performing and better documented
> hardware available for nearly the same price. This makes the rpi
> unattractive for developers.

If so, try install FreeBSD. Last time I checked, it worked pretty well for me.

BR,
Doug.

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Re: Running OpenBSD on Raspberry Pi

Maxim Bourmistrov-5
In reply to this post by Loïc Blot-2
USB2ETH will be "Achilles' heel" with this hw, as soon as you start pushing
pkts.

On 31 dec 2012, at 13:45, Loïc BLOT <[hidden email]> wrote:

> That's the cheapest solution for homing firewall

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Re: Running OpenBSD on Raspberry Pi

Mikkel C. Simonsen
In reply to this post by Loïc Blot-2
Loïc BLOT wrote:
> It's a shame not to port OpenBSD on a Raspberry PI. I would like to a
> make a cheap firewall router box at home with this.

Buy a used thin client on ebay. Better performance, less hassle and more
flexibility. And it's cheaper than your beloved Raspberry Pi!

And as a bonus, you can install the wireless card in the box.

The Raspberry Pi is a nice toy, but it's still just a toy - in my opinion.

Best regards,

Mikkel C. Simonsen

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Re: Running OpenBSD on Raspberry Pi

Keith-125
In reply to this post by Maxim Bourmistrov-5
On 31/12/2012 13:20, mxb wrote:
> USB2ETH will be "Achilles' heel" with this hw, as soon as you start pushing
> pkts.
>
> On 31 dec 2012, at 13:45, Loïc BLOT <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>> That's the cheapest solution for homing firewall
I also heard that usb and interupts are a real issue with the Pii
although that was with video streaming.

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Re: Running OpenBSD on Raspberry Pi

Maxim Bourmistrov-5
In reply to this post by Mikkel C. Simonsen
Exactly!

Toys are known to not hold now a days, unless it is a expensive toy.
Even those has a questionable quality.

On 31 dec 2012, at 14:49, "Mikkel C. Simonsen" <[hidden email]> wrote:

> The Raspberry Pi is a nice toy, but it's still just a toy - in my opinion.

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Re: Running OpenBSD on Raspberry Pi

Nick Holland
If you think you can implement OpenBSD on a Raspberry Pi machine, shut
up and hack.  Then, make the result fit with the OpenBSD policy
statements in http://www.openbsd.org/goals.html and
http://www.openbsd.org/policy.html
THEN talk about it.

If you can't do it, no point talking about it.  OpenBSD Developers have
made their opinions on this system quite clear.

If you look at what NetBSD and FreeBSD are saying about their Raspberry
Pi support, it doesn't look at all "Ready for use" -- NetBSD doesn't
seem to have any useful I/O (i.e., USB, network), and doesn't list it on
their platform port pages.  FreeBSD is not self-supporting, and the
information about it seems to be only in blogs, not the main freebsd
website (type "Raspberry" into their search box).

The Raspberry Pi people have not seemed overly cooperative with people
wishing to port other OSs to their platform, which is, of course, their
right...but it is also our right to not show great interest in the
system for that reason.

Nick.

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Re: Running OpenBSD on Raspberry Pi

Bruno Flueckiger
In reply to this post by BARDOU Pierre
On 12/31/12 14:17, BARDOU Pierre wrote:

>
> I would be very interested by an OpenBSD port too.
> Usage : home router with firewall, DNS and DHCP.
>
> I am looking into FreeBSD and NetBSD ports, but I would prefer to have
> the latest PF and OpenSSH versions... plus I am more used to OpenBSD
> and I like using it
>
> If somebody knows X86 hardware able to do the same (routing/firewlling
> 20 mbps traffic, VLAN, fits in a tiny box, power consumption below 5W,
> price around 50$) as the raspberry I am interested BTW.
>

A lot of different embedded devices which base on x86 cpus, just ask the
web search engine of your trust. It will be hard to get it for "only"
$50. But paying some more bucks for a system which fits the needs is
justified in my opinion.

My personal favorites are the boxes from this small company in Switzerland:

http://www.pcengines.ch

BTW: The RPI as a system looks like a very compact streaming client to
me (honestly, which firewall needs a HDMI port?). If I would want to run
a streaming client with a freely available OS OpenBSD is not my first
choice. Don't get me wrong, I love OpenBSD. But not every OS available
is the right choice for every job. Although some folks selling (and even
some developing) products basing on the Linux kernel try to tell you
this about their products.

Regards,
Bruno

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Re: Running OpenBSD on Raspberry Pi

Anders Arnholm
In reply to this post by Maxim Bourmistrov-5
mxb skrev 2012-12-31 11:53:
> Because I don't see it handle pressure…..
>
> Sure arcade and siri proxy are fun, but x86-based hw for those same tasks is probably out there….
>
You never find the x86 based hardware with power consumption in the same
area or for that matter heat generation in the same area. At work we
tried to work with intel atom based boards for automotive, but they
generate to much heat and becomes unstable because of that. The Arm
based hardware are many years ahead.

A computer to run silent and with out fans in closet or something like
that, I expect would gain much form less heat generations and any 24/7
home server would gain from less power consumption.

The Pi have some advantages over the Beagle board and some disadvantages.

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Re: Running OpenBSD on Raspberry Pi

Aaron Mason
In reply to this post by Peter Nicolai Mathias Hansteen
On Mon, Dec 31, 2012 at 10:15 PM, Peter N. M. Hansteen <[hidden email]> wrote:

> I recently made the mistake of rebuilding openssl on a Pentium3 box,
> cutting seriously into my beer time, but the day to day tasks it's been
> assigned all those years the machine performs admirably.
>

Not to be a two shit, but I once compiled Java on a Pentium 166
running OpenBSD 4.3 - took two days. The same task on an AMD Athlon64
3500+ took two hours.

--
Aaron Mason - Programmer, open source addict
I've taken my software vows - for beta or for worse

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Re: Running OpenBSD on Raspberry Pi

Maximo Pech Jaramillo
In reply to this post by KarlOskar Rikås
> Hi, I wonder if it's possible to run OpenBSD on Raspberry Pi.
>
> Is there any image ready for putting on my SD card and boot up? If not, is
> there any manual or guide how to make one?
>
> Thanks.
>
>
I've been doing some research and there is a number of things that openbsd
needs to support the raspberry pi on a fully functional way.

At least those thing are:

- Support for armv6 CPUs
- Something like the Linux frambuffer
-  A driver for the video chip that uses that frame buffer-like layer
- Kernel mode setting
- Some specific drivers like that vchiq thing. That one is dual licensed
bsd/gpl so maybe it can be ported more easily.

AFAIK those are not implemented on openbsd, some of them are worked on and
for some the are no plans.

So it is not a trivial task.

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Re: Running OpenBSD on Raspberry Pi

Stuart Henderson
In reply to this post by Maxim Bourmistrov-5
On 2012-12-31, mxb <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Excuse me, but isn't it a sadomasochism to run all those stuff on this kind of hardware?

Not quite rpi, but some UK ISPs run core routing (software forwarding + bgp)
and L2TP LNS on ARM based hardware.. Some situations are very sensitive to power
consumption and it can be worth a fair amount of pain to cut that to a minimum.

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Re: Running OpenBSD on Raspberry Pi

Gene-46
In reply to this post by Bruno Flueckiger
On Tue, Jan 1, 2013 at 1:31 AM, Bruno Flückiger <[hidden email]> wrote:

> On 12/31/12 14:17, BARDOU Pierre wrote:
>>
>> I would be very interested by an OpenBSD port too.
>> Usage : home router with firewall, DNS and DHCP.
>>
>> I am looking into FreeBSD and NetBSD ports, but I would prefer to have
>> the latest PF and OpenSSH versions... plus I am more used to OpenBSD
>> and I like using it
>>
>> If somebody knows X86 hardware able to do the same (routing/firewlling
>> 20 mbps traffic, VLAN, fits in a tiny box, power consumption below 5W,
>> price around 50$) as the raspberry I am interested BTW.
>>
>
> A lot of different embedded devices which base on x86 cpus, just ask the
> web search engine of your trust. It will be hard to get it for "only"
> $50. But paying some more bucks for a system which fits the needs is
> justified in my opinion.
>
> My personal favorites are the boxes from this small company in Switzerland:
>
> http://www.pcengines.ch
>
> Regards,
> Bruno
>

The ALIX hardware is incredible.  I own two of the ALIX boards (2d3
and 2d13), the second one I picked up recently on eBay for $150 with
case and power supply, I added a CF card for an additional ~$10.  I
already have a serial cable on hand, but that would be at most another
$10-$20 to procure.

The ALIX.2d13 has three full fast ethernet (10/100) NICs that aren't
USB devices on a headless x86 compatible system that will utilise ~5W
at high to full load for under $200.  All in one enclosure and rock
solid.

Sure, that may sound expensive, but after purchasing a Raspberry Pi
with a powered USB hub, one or two USB fast ethernet adapters, an SD
card, and whatever other accessories you need it isn't that much of a
price difference.

Or, you can buy a cheap Atom box, throw in some storage and RAM, and
have a much more powerful system at the expense of higher energy
usage.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16856205007

That one costs $130 (+taxes and shipping) and has two gig-e NICs.

I own a couple of the Raspberry Pi units.  They're fantastic little
devices, but you'll have to use Linux and have a hodge-podge of
accessories to go with it.

-Gene

(if you see this message twice please forgive me, I'm bad at mailing lists)

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Re: Running OpenBSD on Raspberry Pi

Aaron Mason
On Fri, Jan 4, 2013 at 6:08 AM, Gene <[hidden email]> wrote:

> On Tue, Jan 1, 2013 at 1:31 AM, Bruno Flückiger <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> On 12/31/12 14:17, BARDOU Pierre wrote:
>>>
>>> I would be very interested by an OpenBSD port too.
>>> Usage : home router with firewall, DNS and DHCP.
>>>
>>> I am looking into FreeBSD and NetBSD ports, but I would prefer to have
>>> the latest PF and OpenSSH versions... plus I am more used to OpenBSD
>>> and I like using it
>>>
>>> If somebody knows X86 hardware able to do the same (routing/firewlling
>>> 20 mbps traffic, VLAN, fits in a tiny box, power consumption below 5W,
>>> price around 50$) as the raspberry I am interested BTW.
>>>
>>
>> A lot of different embedded devices which base on x86 cpus, just ask the
>> web search engine of your trust. It will be hard to get it for "only"
>> $50. But paying some more bucks for a system which fits the needs is
>> justified in my opinion.
>>
>> My personal favorites are the boxes from this small company in Switzerland:
>>
>> http://www.pcengines.ch
>>
>> Regards,
>> Bruno
>>
>
> The ALIX hardware is incredible.  I own two of the ALIX boards (2d3
> and 2d13), the second one I picked up recently on eBay for $150 with
> case and power supply, I added a CF card for an additional ~$10.  I
> already have a serial cable on hand, but that would be at most another
> $10-$20 to procure.
>
> The ALIX.2d13 has three full fast ethernet (10/100) NICs that aren't
> USB devices on a headless x86 compatible system that will utilise ~5W
> at high to full load for under $200.  All in one enclosure and rock
> solid.
>
> Sure, that may sound expensive, but after purchasing a Raspberry Pi
> with a powered USB hub, one or two USB fast ethernet adapters, an SD
> card, and whatever other accessories you need it isn't that much of a
> price difference.
>
> Or, you can buy a cheap Atom box, throw in some storage and RAM, and
> have a much more powerful system at the expense of higher energy
> usage.
>
> http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16856205007
>
> That one costs $130 (+taxes and shipping) and has two gig-e NICs.
>
> I own a couple of the Raspberry Pi units.  They're fantastic little
> devices, but you'll have to use Linux and have a hodge-podge of
> accessories to go with it.
>
> -Gene
>
> (if you see this message twice please forgive me, I'm bad at mailing lists)
>

RPi is good for remote control stuff - I've only just learned that the
GPIO on it can be controlled in the same fashion as those on an
Arduino board with the exception of reading analogue inputs since
there's no ADC on board, but that could be fixed with a breakout
board.

But yes, I agree, for anything else you need a plethora of other
things to bring it to the required functional level.

Also, I see you are a fellow GMail user - if you go into the labs you
can enable Reply to All as the default action, from there just move
the mailing list email address to the To field to replace whatever was
in there.  I also find it helpful to turn off rich formatting, but it
seems you've already done that.

--
Aaron Mason - Programmer, open source addict
I've taken my software vows - for beta or for worse

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Re: Running OpenBSD on Raspberry Pi

James Shupe-4
In reply to this post by Gene-46
On 1/3/2013 1:08 PM, Gene wrote:

> On Tue, Jan 1, 2013 at 1:31 AM, Bruno Flückiger <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> On 12/31/12 14:17, BARDOU Pierre wrote:
>>>
>>> I would be very interested by an OpenBSD port too.
>>> Usage : home router with firewall, DNS and DHCP.
>>>
>>> I am looking into FreeBSD and NetBSD ports, but I would prefer to have
>>> the latest PF and OpenSSH versions... plus I am more used to OpenBSD
>>> and I like using it
>>>
>>> If somebody knows X86 hardware able to do the same (routing/firewlling
>>> 20 mbps traffic, VLAN, fits in a tiny box, power consumption below 5W,
>>> price around 50$) as the raspberry I am interested BTW.
>>>
>>
>> A lot of different embedded devices which base on x86 cpus, just ask the
>> web search engine of your trust. It will be hard to get it for "only"
>> $50. But paying some more bucks for a system which fits the needs is
>> justified in my opinion.
>>
>> My personal favorites are the boxes from this small company in
Switzerland:

>>
>> http://www.pcengines.ch
>>
>> Regards,
>> Bruno
>>
>
> The ALIX hardware is incredible.  I own two of the ALIX boards (2d3
> and 2d13), the second one I picked up recently on eBay for $150 with
> case and power supply, I added a CF card for an additional ~$10.  I
> already have a serial cable on hand, but that would be at most another
> $10-$20 to procure.
>
> The ALIX.2d13 has three full fast ethernet (10/100) NICs that aren't
> USB devices on a headless x86 compatible system that will utilise ~5W
> at high to full load for under $200.  All in one enclosure and rock
> solid.
>
> Sure, that may sound expensive, but after purchasing a Raspberry Pi
> with a powered USB hub, one or two USB fast ethernet adapters, an SD
> card, and whatever other accessories you need it isn't that much of a
> price difference.
>
> Or, you can buy a cheap Atom box, throw in some storage and RAM, and
> have a much more powerful system at the expense of higher energy
> usage.
>
> http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16856205007
>
> That one costs $130 (+taxes and shipping) and has two gig-e NICs.
>
> I own a couple of the Raspberry Pi units.  They're fantastic little
> devices, but you'll have to use Linux and have a hodge-podge of
> accessories to go with it.
>
> -Gene
>
> (if you see this message twice please forgive me, I'm bad at mailing lists)
>
>
>

Alix hardware is great. I just felt the need to share this photo of my
office around this time last year... http://i.imgur.com/c528h.jpg

--
James Shupe

[demime 1.01d removed an attachment of type application/pgp-signature which had a name of signature.asc]

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Re: Running OpenBSD on Raspberry Pi

Aaron Mason
On Fri, Jan 4, 2013 at 11:52 AM, James Shupe <[hidden email]> wrote:

> On 1/3/2013 1:08 PM, Gene wrote:
>> On Tue, Jan 1, 2013 at 1:31 AM, Bruno Flückiger <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>> On 12/31/12 14:17, BARDOU Pierre wrote:
>>>>
>>>> I would be very interested by an OpenBSD port too.
>>>> Usage : home router with firewall, DNS and DHCP.
>>>>
>>>> I am looking into FreeBSD and NetBSD ports, but I would prefer to have
>>>> the latest PF and OpenSSH versions... plus I am more used to OpenBSD
>>>> and I like using it
>>>>
>>>> If somebody knows X86 hardware able to do the same (routing/firewlling
>>>> 20 mbps traffic, VLAN, fits in a tiny box, power consumption below 5W,
>>>> price around 50$) as the raspberry I am interested BTW.
>>>>
>>>
>>> A lot of different embedded devices which base on x86 cpus, just ask the
>>> web search engine of your trust. It will be hard to get it for "only"
>>> $50. But paying some more bucks for a system which fits the needs is
>>> justified in my opinion.
>>>
>>> My personal favorites are the boxes from this small company in
> Switzerland:
>>>
>>> http://www.pcengines.ch
>>>
>>> Regards,
>>> Bruno
>>>
>>
>> The ALIX hardware is incredible.  I own two of the ALIX boards (2d3
>> and 2d13), the second one I picked up recently on eBay for $150 with
>> case and power supply, I added a CF card for an additional ~$10.  I
>> already have a serial cable on hand, but that would be at most another
>> $10-$20 to procure.
>>
>> The ALIX.2d13 has three full fast ethernet (10/100) NICs that aren't
>> USB devices on a headless x86 compatible system that will utilise ~5W
>> at high to full load for under $200.  All in one enclosure and rock
>> solid.
>>
>> Sure, that may sound expensive, but after purchasing a Raspberry Pi
>> with a powered USB hub, one or two USB fast ethernet adapters, an SD
>> card, and whatever other accessories you need it isn't that much of a
>> price difference.
>>
>> Or, you can buy a cheap Atom box, throw in some storage and RAM, and
>> have a much more powerful system at the expense of higher energy
>> usage.
>>
>> http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16856205007
>>
>> That one costs $130 (+taxes and shipping) and has two gig-e NICs.
>>
>> I own a couple of the Raspberry Pi units.  They're fantastic little
>> devices, but you'll have to use Linux and have a hodge-podge of
>> accessories to go with it.
>>
>> -Gene
>>
>> (if you see this message twice please forgive me, I'm bad at mailing lists)
>>
>>
>>
>
> Alix hardware is great. I just felt the need to share this photo of my
> office around this time last year... http://i.imgur.com/c528h.jpg
>
> --
> James Shupe
>
> [demime 1.01d removed an attachment of type application/pgp-signature which had a name of signature.asc]
>

 Bugger me that's a whole lotta ALiX... 2d3 or 2d13?

--
Aaron Mason - Programmer, open source addict
I've taken my software vows - for beta or for worse

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Re: Running OpenBSD on Raspberry Pi

James Shupe-4
On 1/3/2013 8:26 PM, Aaron Mason wrote:
> On Fri, Jan 4, 2013 at 11:52 AM, James Shupe <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> On 1/3/2013 1:08 PM, Gene wrote:
>>> On Tue, Jan 1, 2013 at 1:31 AM, Bruno Flückiger <[hidden email]>
wrote:

>>>> On 12/31/12 14:17, BARDOU Pierre wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>> I would be very interested by an OpenBSD port too.
>>>>> Usage : home router with firewall, DNS and DHCP.
>>>>>
>>>>> I am looking into FreeBSD and NetBSD ports, but I would prefer to have
>>>>> the latest PF and OpenSSH versions... plus I am more used to OpenBSD
>>>>> and I like using it
>>>>>
>>>>> If somebody knows X86 hardware able to do the same (routing/firewlling
>>>>> 20 mbps traffic, VLAN, fits in a tiny box, power consumption below 5W,
>>>>> price around 50$) as the raspberry I am interested BTW.
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>> A lot of different embedded devices which base on x86 cpus, just ask the
>>>> web search engine of your trust. It will be hard to get it for "only"
>>>> $50. But paying some more bucks for a system which fits the needs is
>>>> justified in my opinion.
>>>>
>>>> My personal favorites are the boxes from this small company in
>> Switzerland:
>>>>
>>>> http://www.pcengines.ch
>>>>
>>>> Regards,
>>>> Bruno
>>>>
>>>
>>> The ALIX hardware is incredible.  I own two of the ALIX boards (2d3
>>> and 2d13), the second one I picked up recently on eBay for $150 with
>>> case and power supply, I added a CF card for an additional ~$10.  I
>>> already have a serial cable on hand, but that would be at most another
>>> $10-$20 to procure.
>>>
>>> The ALIX.2d13 has three full fast ethernet (10/100) NICs that aren't
>>> USB devices on a headless x86 compatible system that will utilise ~5W
>>> at high to full load for under $200.  All in one enclosure and rock
>>> solid.
>>>
>>> Sure, that may sound expensive, but after purchasing a Raspberry Pi
>>> with a powered USB hub, one or two USB fast ethernet adapters, an SD
>>> card, and whatever other accessories you need it isn't that much of a
>>> price difference.
>>>
>>> Or, you can buy a cheap Atom box, throw in some storage and RAM, and
>>> have a much more powerful system at the expense of higher energy
>>> usage.
>>>
>>> http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16856205007
>>>
>>> That one costs $130 (+taxes and shipping) and has two gig-e NICs.
>>>
>>> I own a couple of the Raspberry Pi units.  They're fantastic little
>>> devices, but you'll have to use Linux and have a hodge-podge of
>>> accessories to go with it.
>>>
>>> -Gene
>>>
>>> (if you see this message twice please forgive me, I'm bad at mailing
lists)

>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>> Alix hardware is great. I just felt the need to share this photo of my
>> office around this time last year... http://i.imgur.com/c528h.jpg
>>
>> --
>> James Shupe
>>
>> [demime 1.01d removed an attachment of type application/pgp-signature which
had a name of signature.asc]
>>
>
>  Bugger me that's a whole lotta ALiX... 2d3 or 2d13?
>

They're the 2D13 boards, with Kingston CFs. Of all of those, the only
problems we've had were a few DOA CF cards.

They're running OpenBSD + OpenVPN and serving as VPN "concatenators"
(that's what we're calling them, anyway.) We have employees working at
third party locations where we do not maintain control of their
networks, and need all of our staff's devices -- including network
printers (that can't run VPN software, obviously,) etc, to appear as
though they are on our local network. We chose OpenVPN over IPsec
because of the single port requirement and the fact that most of these
sites have outbound traffic blocked by default. We run a few server
instances on the other end, on various common ports to increase the
chances of success calling home. Each device has between one and six
desktops behind it, along with one or two Xerox machines, and some other
junk that has to be brought back to us.

--
James Shupe

[demime 1.01d removed an attachment of type application/pgp-signature which had a name of signature.asc]

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Re: Running OpenBSD on Raspberry Pi

Aaron Mason
On Fri, Jan 4, 2013 at 4:36 PM, James Shupe <[hidden email]> wrote:

> On 1/3/2013 8:26 PM, Aaron Mason wrote:
>> On Fri, Jan 4, 2013 at 11:52 AM, James Shupe <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>> On 1/3/2013 1:08 PM, Gene wrote:
>>>> On Tue, Jan 1, 2013 at 1:31 AM, Bruno Flückiger <[hidden email]>
> wrote:
>>>>> On 12/31/12 14:17, BARDOU Pierre wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>> I would be very interested by an OpenBSD port too.
>>>>>> Usage : home router with firewall, DNS and DHCP.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> I am looking into FreeBSD and NetBSD ports, but I would prefer to have
>>>>>> the latest PF and OpenSSH versions... plus I am more used to OpenBSD
>>>>>> and I like using it
>>>>>>
>>>>>> If somebody knows X86 hardware able to do the same (routing/firewlling
>>>>>> 20 mbps traffic, VLAN, fits in a tiny box, power consumption below 5W,
>>>>>> price around 50$) as the raspberry I am interested BTW.
>>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> A lot of different embedded devices which base on x86 cpus, just ask the
>>>>> web search engine of your trust. It will be hard to get it for "only"
>>>>> $50. But paying some more bucks for a system which fits the needs is
>>>>> justified in my opinion.
>>>>>
>>>>> My personal favorites are the boxes from this small company in
>>> Switzerland:
>>>>>
>>>>> http://www.pcengines.ch
>>>>>
>>>>> Regards,
>>>>> Bruno
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>> The ALIX hardware is incredible.  I own two of the ALIX boards (2d3
>>>> and 2d13), the second one I picked up recently on eBay for $150 with
>>>> case and power supply, I added a CF card for an additional ~$10.  I
>>>> already have a serial cable on hand, but that would be at most another
>>>> $10-$20 to procure.
>>>>
>>>> The ALIX.2d13 has three full fast ethernet (10/100) NICs that aren't
>>>> USB devices on a headless x86 compatible system that will utilise ~5W
>>>> at high to full load for under $200.  All in one enclosure and rock
>>>> solid.
>>>>
>>>> Sure, that may sound expensive, but after purchasing a Raspberry Pi
>>>> with a powered USB hub, one or two USB fast ethernet adapters, an SD
>>>> card, and whatever other accessories you need it isn't that much of a
>>>> price difference.
>>>>
>>>> Or, you can buy a cheap Atom box, throw in some storage and RAM, and
>>>> have a much more powerful system at the expense of higher energy
>>>> usage.
>>>>
>>>> http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16856205007
>>>>
>>>> That one costs $130 (+taxes and shipping) and has two gig-e NICs.
>>>>
>>>> I own a couple of the Raspberry Pi units.  They're fantastic little
>>>> devices, but you'll have to use Linux and have a hodge-podge of
>>>> accessories to go with it.
>>>>
>>>> -Gene
>>>>
>>>> (if you see this message twice please forgive me, I'm bad at mailing
> lists)
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>> Alix hardware is great. I just felt the need to share this photo of my
>>> office around this time last year... http://i.imgur.com/c528h.jpg
>>>
>>> --
>>> James Shupe
>>>
>>> [demime 1.01d removed an attachment of type application/pgp-signature which
> had a name of signature.asc]
>>>
>>
>>  Bugger me that's a whole lotta ALiX... 2d3 or 2d13?
>>
>
> They're the 2D13 boards, with Kingston CFs. Of all of those, the only
> problems we've had were a few DOA CF cards.
>
> They're running OpenBSD + OpenVPN and serving as VPN "concatenators"
> (that's what we're calling them, anyway.) We have employees working at
> third party locations where we do not maintain control of their
> networks, and need all of our staff's devices -- including network
> printers (that can't run VPN software, obviously,) etc, to appear as
> though they are on our local network. We chose OpenVPN over IPsec
> because of the single port requirement and the fact that most of these
> sites have outbound traffic blocked by default. We run a few server
> instances on the other end, on various common ports to increase the
> chances of success calling home. Each device has between one and six
> desktops behind it, along with one or two Xerox machines, and some other
> junk that has to be brought back to us.
>
> --
> James Shupe
>
> [demime 1.01d removed an attachment of type application/pgp-signature which had a name of signature.asc]
>

Hmm, something to consider.  We've been using GRE and IPSec but found
that we needed to employ some serious firewall trickery to get it
going, and it's just too much, especially if the other side's a bit
green on the concept.  Might suggest it to my boss.  Worst case we
send out an old laptop running OpenBSD and OpenVPN.

--
Aaron Mason - Programmer, open source addict
I've taken my software vows - for beta or for worse

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