Re: What does your environment look like?

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Re: What does your environment look like?

Josh Rickmar-2
Forgot to send to list.

Josh

----- Forwarded message from Josh Rickmar <[hidden email]> -----

Date: Sat, 2 Jan 2010 21:29:50 +0000
From: Josh Rickmar <[hidden email]>
To: Brynet <[hidden email]>
Subject: Re: What does your environment look like?
User-Agent: Mutt/1.5.20 (2009-06-14)

On Sat, Jan 02, 2010 at 09:08:38PM -0500, Brynet wrote:

> Hi,
>
> I know not everyone uses OpenBSD for a desktop OS, but I have been for
> nearly 5 years and I'm quite curious about some of your opinions? do you
>  embrace minimalism or pure aesthetics? are the two mutually exclusive?
>
> When I started using OpenBSD (..around 3.7) I was frequently switching
> between window managers, tweaking.. but for 2 years now I've been using
> fluxbox and I believe I'm comfortable with it.
>
> * Do you use one of the bundled window managers like
> cwm(1)/twm(1)/fvwm(1) or something else?

dwm (with patches)

> * What other utilities do you find useful, any "dockapps" or similar
> applets? personal customizations?

dmenu

> * Do you try to keep things uniform across other desktops?

I'm on a laptop, not so much of an issue. Otherwise I would.

> * What does your environment look like? anyone willing to post
> screenshots or actual workspace photos?

http://imagebin.ca/view/3JllgShA.png

> I realize none of this may be relevant or even useful, but I figured it
> was worth asking here anyway.
>
> Anyone feel like humouring me? :-)
>
> Thanks.
> -Bryan.
>

Josh

----- End forwarded message -----

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Re: What does your environment look like?

Bryan Brake
On Sat, Jan 2, 2010 at 16:04, Josh Rickmar <[hidden email]> wrote:

> dmenu
>
>> * Do you try to keep things uniform across other desktops?
>
> I'm on a laptop, not so much of an issue. Otherwise I would.
>
>> * What does your environment look like? anyone willing to post
>> screenshots or actual workspace photos?
>
> http://imagebin.ca/view/3JllgShA.png
>
I will kill to learn how to use mutt...  It looks great...

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Re: What does your environment look like?

Tomas Bodzar-4
In reply to this post by Josh Rickmar-2
I use default fvwm(1) and I'm happy with that. I tried cwm(1) after
this post http://undeadly.org/cgi?action=article&sid=20090502141551
and I found it very clean and useful, but I still use fvwm(1). Anyway
I plan to try this one http://www.scrotwm.org/

On Sat, Jan 2, 2010 at 11:04 PM, Josh Rickmar <[hidden email]>
wrote:

> Forgot to send to list.
>
> Josh
>
> ----- Forwarded message from Josh Rickmar <[hidden email]> -----
>
> Date: Sat, 2 Jan 2010 21:29:50 +0000
> From: Josh Rickmar <[hidden email]>
> To: Brynet <[hidden email]>
> Subject: Re: What does your environment look like?
> User-Agent: Mutt/1.5.20 (2009-06-14)
>
> On Sat, Jan 02, 2010 at 09:08:38PM -0500, Brynet wrote:
>> Hi,
>>
>> I know not everyone uses OpenBSD for a desktop OS, but I have been for
>> nearly 5 years and I'm quite curious about some of your opinions? do you
>> B embrace minimalism or pure aesthetics? are the two mutually exclusive?
>>
>> When I started using OpenBSD (..around 3.7) I was frequently switching
>> between window managers, tweaking.. but for 2 years now I've been using
>> fluxbox and I believe I'm comfortable with it.
>>
>> * Do you use one of the bundled window managers like
>> cwm(1)/twm(1)/fvwm(1) or something else?
>
> dwm (with patches)
>
>> * What other utilities do you find useful, any "dockapps" or similar
>> applets? personal customizations?
>
> dmenu
>
>> * Do you try to keep things uniform across other desktops?
>
> I'm on a laptop, not so much of an issue. Otherwise I would.
>
>> * What does your environment look like? anyone willing to post
>> screenshots or actual workspace photos?
>
> http://imagebin.ca/view/3JllgShA.png
>
>> I realize none of this may be relevant or even useful, but I figured it
>> was worth asking here anyway.
>>
>> Anyone feel like humouring me? :-)
>>
>> Thanks.
>> -Bryan.
>>
>
> Josh
>
> ----- End forwarded message -----
>
>



--
http://www.openbsd.org/lyrics.html

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Re: What does your environment look like?

Josh Rickmar-2
In reply to this post by Josh Rickmar-2
Sorry for the duplicate again... I really have to get used to using
mutt's list-reply.

----- Forwarded message from Josh Rickmar <[hidden email]> -----

Date: Sun, 3 Jan 2010 08:30:26 +0000
From: Josh Rickmar <[hidden email]>
To: Tomas Bodzar <[hidden email]>
Subject: Re: What does your environment look like?
User-Agent: Mutt/1.5.20 (2009-06-14)

On Sun, Jan 03, 2010 at 09:01:45AM +0100, Tomas Bodzar wrote:
> I use default fvwm(1) and I'm happy with that. I tried cwm(1) after
> this post http://undeadly.org/cgi?action=article&sid=20090502141551
> and I found it very clean and useful, but I still use fvwm(1). Anyway
> I plan to try this one http://www.scrotwm.org/

I tried out scrotwm, wasn't all that impressed. I really don't
understand why the devs decided to remove dwm's tagging features.

This may have changed in more recent version of scrotwm, but back when I
last tried it, the statusbar also was not able to show you which
workspaces currently had windows on them, so I ended up quiting scrotwm
and X when I still had windows open... not fun.

Anyways, each to his own.

Josh

----- End forwarded message -----

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Re: What does your environment look like?

Julian Leyh-2
In reply to this post by Bryan Brake
Am 03.01.10 04:11, schrieb Bryan:
>> http://imagebin.ca/view/3JllgShA.png
>>
> I will kill to learn how to use mutt...  It looks great...
>

That's vim used as editor for messages in mutt. But yes, mutt is great.

CPB
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Re: What does your environment look like?

CPB
In reply to this post by Josh Rickmar-2
Josh Rickmar wrote:

> I tried out scrotwm, wasn't all that impressed. I really don't
> understand why the devs decided to remove dwm's tagging features.
>
> This may have changed in more recent version of scrotwm, but back when I
> last tried it, the statusbar also was not able to show you which
> workspaces currently had windows on them, so I ended up quiting scrotwm
> and X when I still had windows open... not fun.
>
>
>  
Scrotwm now has two settings :

title_class_enabled     Enable or disable displaying the window
                                   class in the status bar.  Enable by
setting
                                   to 1
title_name_enabled    Enable or disable displaying the window ti-
                                   tle in the status bar.  Enable by setting
                                   to 1
These show what is open in a window when AT the window.
Perhaps this function could be exploited to add a prompt when quitting
with windows active?
Or add an optional row to status bar showing active windows.

I agree, I don't like having to tab through 10 windows before shutting down.

--
A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
   -- Robert Heinlein

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Re: What does your environment look like?

Marco Peereboom
I had it on the status bar before and hated it. I have never found any  
use for tagging.

On Jan 3, 2010, at 8:23, Chris Bennett <[hidden email]>  
wrote:

> Josh Rickmar wrote:
>> I tried out scrotwm, wasn't all that impressed. I really don't
>> understand why the devs decided to remove dwm's tagging features.
>>
>> This may have changed in more recent version of scrotwm, but back  
>> when I
>> last tried it, the statusbar also was not able to show you which
>> workspaces currently had windows on them, so I ended up quiting  
>> scrotwm
>> and X when I still had windows open... not fun.
>>
>>
>>
> Scrotwm now has two settings :
>
> title_class_enabled     Enable or disable displaying the window
>                                  class in the status bar.  Enable by  
> setting
>                                  to 1
> title_name_enabled    Enable or disable displaying the window ti-
>                                  tle in the status bar.  Enable by  
> setting
>                                  to 1
> These show what is open in a window when AT the window.
> Perhaps this function could be exploited to add a prompt when  
> quitting with windows active?
> Or add an optional row to status bar showing active windows.
>
> I agree, I don't like having to tab through 10 windows before  
> shutting down.
>
> --
> A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
> butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
> accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
> give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
> problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
> efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
>  -- Robert Heinlein

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Re: What does your environment look like?

Ryan Flannery
On Sun, Jan 3, 2010 at 7:20 PM, Marco Peereboom <[hidden email]> wrote:
> On Jan 3, 2010, at 8:23, Chris Bennett <[hidden email]>
>> Josh Rickmar wrote:
[snip]
>>> This may have changed in more recent version of scrotwm, but back when I
>>> last tried it, the statusbar also was not able to show you which
>>> workspaces currently had windows on them, so I ended up quiting scrotwm
>>> and X when I still had windows open... not fun.
[snip]
>> I agree, I don't like having to tab through 10 windows before shutting
>> down.

The "M+left" and "M+right" keybindings may be useful for you then.
They cycle through the workspaces with windows in them (skipping those
that are empty).
Just FYI.

-Ryan

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Re: What does your environment look like?

Josh Rickmar-2
On Sun, Jan 03, 2010 at 07:41:04PM -0500, Ryan Flannery wrote:

> On Sun, Jan 3, 2010 at 7:20 PM, Marco Peereboom <[hidden email]> wrote:
> > On Jan 3, 2010, at 8:23, Chris Bennett <[hidden email]>
> >> Josh Rickmar wrote:
> [snip]
> >>> This may have changed in more recent version of scrotwm, but back when I
> >>> last tried it, the statusbar also was not able to show you which
> >>> workspaces currently had windows on them, so I ended up quiting scrotwm
> >>> and X when I still had windows open... not fun.
> [snip]
> >> I agree, I don't like having to tab through 10 windows before shutting
> >> down.
>
> The "M+left" and "M+right" keybindings may be useful for you then.
> They cycle through the workspaces with windows in them (skipping those
> that are empty).
> Just FYI.
>
> -Ryan
>

Ah, nice. Yeah, after looking through the manual again, I tried all the
features, and found that out as well.

Just to see what has changed since I last used it, I installed scrotwm
and started writing down a list of things which I didn't really like or
that I found odd:

* No tagging

Since Marco doesn't really like this, and it is his wm, I doubt this
would be comming back (a shame, really. you can still use tags as
regular workspaces if so inclined).

* Statusbar doesn't display windows on other workspaces

Same here.

* Statusbar doesn't display WM_NAME(STRING).

I found it odd that there are options to display things like the
window's class, but not the actual title of the window. Maybe I could
write a patch for this.

* Can't bind mouse actions on windows
* Can't bind mouse actions on the statusbar

I use surf as my browser, and prefer to use it without any other
programs to handle multiple windows (ie. tabbed), besides the wm. Since
my hand is almost always on the mouse anyways, I find it really
convenient to use mouse bindings to perform certain actions (like right
clicking the statusbar to delete the current window, for instance).

* Can't switch to a specific layout, only cycle (no way to bind this).

I thought it was weird the first time I used dwm (comming from xmonad),
but after using it for a while, I have really missed it in scrotwm. I
think that it should be possible to at least bind keys to certain
layouts so you can change to it without having to cycle through all the
others first.

* No layout for floating

I like the way dwm distinguishes between floating windows in a tiled
layout and windows that are set to float because of the current floating
layout, so if you switch back to a tiled layout, windows which you have
explicitly set to floating will remain floating.

* New windows are always pushed to the bottom of the stack, can't be
  configured

I think this should be an option.

* Opening or closing a window with any floating moves the floating one
  to center

Sounds like a bug.

* Impossible to move any part of a floating window off screen.

Not sure if this is a bug or design decision, but I find it awkward at
times.

Anyways, I tried this with the scrotwm package (-current), so some of
these bugs may have been fixed in the most recent version. I wouldn't
mind writing patches for some of them, but the fact that things like
tagging and the changes in the statusbar have been changed for the worse
(imho, of course) make me rather want to stay with dwm.

Anyways, good luck with your scrotwm project. Even if I don't really
care for all the changes, I know you and others do.

(I will say that scrotwm makes an excellent xmonad replacement, for
those of you that haven't been already spoiled by switching to dwm. :)

CPB
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Re: What does your environment look like?

CPB
In reply to this post by Ryan Flannery
Ryan Flannery wrote:

> On Sun, Jan 3, 2010 at 7:20 PM, Marco Peereboom <[hidden email]> wrote:
>  
>> On Jan 3, 2010, at 8:23, Chris Bennett <[hidden email]>
>>    
>>> Josh Rickmar wrote:
>>>      
> [snip]
>  
>>>> This may have changed in more recent version of scrotwm, but back when I
>>>> last tried it, the statusbar also was not able to show you which
>>>> workspaces currently had windows on them, so I ended up quiting scrotwm
>>>> and X when I still had windows open... not fun.
>>>>        
> [snip]
>  
>>> I agree, I don't like having to tab through 10 windows before shutting
>>> down.
>>>      
>
> The "M+left" and "M+right" keybindings may be useful for you then.
> They cycle through the workspaces with windows in them (skipping those
> that are empty).
> Just FYI.
>
> -Ryan
>
>
>  
Well then, thats that.
I didn't realize that they skipped empties!
OK, I'm happy now.

--
A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
   -- Robert Heinlein

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Re: What does your environment look like?

Marco Peereboom
In reply to this post by Josh Rickmar-2
I'll take patches. There are several features I don't use but still  
committed; the only requirements I have are:
* ISC licensed
* not in the way of current behavior
* well written and within the scrotwm style

If you need things like tags write the patch an it'll go in provided  
you meet the requirements.

On Jan 3, 2010, at 14:31, Josh Rickmar <[hidden email]> wrote:

> On Sun, Jan 03, 2010 at 07:41:04PM -0500, Ryan Flannery wrote:
>> On Sun, Jan 3, 2010 at 7:20 PM, Marco Peereboom  
>> <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>> On Jan 3, 2010, at 8:23, Chris Bennett <[hidden email]
>>> >
>>>> Josh Rickmar wrote:
>> [snip]
>>>>> This may have changed in more recent version of scrotwm, but  
>>>>> back when I
>>>>> last tried it, the statusbar also was not able to show you which
>>>>> workspaces currently had windows on them, so I ended up quiting  
>>>>> scrotwm
>>>>> and X when I still had windows open... not fun.
>> [snip]
>>>> I agree, I don't like having to tab through 10 windows before  
>>>> shutting
>>>> down.
>>
>> The "M+left" and "M+right" keybindings may be useful for you then.
>> They cycle through the workspaces with windows in them (skipping  
>> those
>> that are empty).
>> Just FYI.
>>
>> -Ryan
>>
>
> Ah, nice. Yeah, after looking through the manual again, I tried all  
> the
> features, and found that out as well.
>
> Just to see what has changed since I last used it, I installed scrotwm
> and started writing down a list of things which I didn't really like  
> or
> that I found odd:
>
> * No tagging
>
> Since Marco doesn't really like this, and it is his wm, I doubt this
> would be comming back (a shame, really. you can still use tags as
> regular workspaces if so inclined).

What do you mean come back? I used a couple of ideas and lines of code  
from dwm but it is essentially completly written from scratch. It was  
never in there.

>
>
> * Statusbar doesn't display windows on other workspaces
>
> Same here.
>
> * Statusbar doesn't display WM_NAME(STRING).
>
> I found it odd that there are options to display things like the
> window's class, but not the actual title of the window. Maybe I could
> write a patch for this.
>

Yeah that would be nice. Patch please.

> * Can't bind mouse actions on windows
> * Can't bind mouse actions on the statusbar
>

I use the mouse for the tubes and cut and paste. I'll flat a patch for  
this too.

> I use surf as my browser, and prefer to use it without any other
> programs to handle multiple windows (ie. tabbed), besides the wm.  
> Since
> my hand is almost always on the mouse anyways, I find it really
> convenient to use mouse bindings to perform certain actions (like  
> right
> clicking the statusbar to delete the current window, for instance).
>
> * Can't switch to a specific layout, only cycle (no way to bind this).
>

That is dwc being lazy. Make him fix this.

> I thought it was weird the first time I used dwm (comming from  
> xmonad),
> but after using it for a while, I have really missed it in scrotwm. I
> think that it should be possible to at least bind keys to certain
> layouts so you can change to it without having to cycle through all  
> the
> others first.
>
> * No layout for floating
>

Need to spend a week on this to unfuck floats. It is a surprisingly  
hard problem. I will eventualy get to this.

> I like the way dwm distinguishes between floating windows in a tiled
> layout and windows that are set to float because of the current  
> floating
> layout, so if you switch back to a tiled layout, windows which you  
> have
> explicitly set to floating will remain floating.
>
> * New windows are always pushed to the bottom of the stack, can't be
>  configured
>
> I think this should be an option.

Nah, m-enter is the magic.

>
>
> * Opening or closing a window with any floating moves the floating one
>  to center
>
> Sounds like a bug.

See previous float comment.

>
>
> * Impossible to move any part of a floating window off screen.
>
> Not sure if this is a bug or design decision, but I find it awkward at
> times.
>

By design; the reason is xrandr akwardness and it can't be gotten  
right. So preventing it from moving offscreen was the best option.  
Maybe this can be fixed with the floaters.

> Anyways, I tried this with the scrotwm package (-current), so some of
> these bugs may have been fixed in the most recent version. I wouldn't
> mind writing patches for some of them, but the fact that things like
> tagging and the changes in the statusbar have been changed for the  
> worse
> (imho, of course) make me rather want to stay with dwm.
>
> Anyways, good luck with your scrotwm project. Even if I don't really
> care for all the changes, I know you and others do.
>
> (I will say that scrotwm makes an excellent xmonad replacement, for
> those of you that haven't been already spoiled by switching to dwm. :)

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Re: What does your environment look like?

Josh Rickmar-2
On Sun, Jan 03, 2010 at 08:07:58PM -0600, Marco Peereboom wrote:
> I'll take patches. There are several features I don't use but still
> committed; the only requirements I have are:
> * ISC licensed
> * not in the way of current behavior
> * well written and within the scrotwm style

I'll see what I can do then (first time in the scrotwm codebase).

> >* No tagging
> >
> >Since Marco doesn't really like this, and it is his wm, I doubt this
> >would be comming back (a shame, really. you can still use tags as
> >regular workspaces if so inclined).
>
> What do you mean come back? I used a couple of ideas and lines of
> code from dwm but it is essentially completly written from scratch.
> It was never in there.

I was under the impression that it was basically dwm with your own
changes and unneeded things stripped out (at least that's how I
intrepreted your webpage).

> >I like the way dwm distinguishes between floating windows in a tiled
> >layout and windows that are set to float because of the current
> >floating
> >layout, so if you switch back to a tiled layout, windows which you
> >have
> >explicitly set to floating will remain floating.
> >
> >* New windows are always pushed to the bottom of the stack, can't be
> > configured
> >
> >I think this should be an option.
>
> Nah, m-enter is the magic.

What about opening a window above the current one (xmonad-style)?

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Re: What does your environment look like?

Nick Guenther
In reply to this post by Tomas Bodzar-4
On Sun, Jan 3, 2010 at 3:01 AM, Tomas Bodzar <[hidden email]> wrote:
> I use default fvwm(1) and I'm happy with that. I tried cwm(1) after
> this post http://undeadly.org/cgi?action=article&sid=20090502141551
> and I found it very clean and useful, but I still use fvwm(1). Anyway
> I plan to try this one http://www.scrotwm.org/
>

I never figured out fvwm. It has multiple desktops and you can drag
windows between them but it jumps them too far too easily. Tell me,
what's the appeal? I'm willing to think I'm just not understanding it
(though points should always be allotted for intuitiveness).

I use wmii with a bunch of dmenu custom menus. I haven't found a file
manager I like (xfe is the best so far, but it uses some weird custom
toolkit, thunar is nice but really wants famd, which for some reason
seems associated with trackerd spinning up and eating my CPU, the
rox-filer in packages doesn't work right). I like Midori but it
doesn't work everywhere, so I keep firefox and epiphany and galeon
around (why is it that Gecko seems so much slower on OpenBSD than
Linux?). I try to use mpd but sometimes I just don't bother to set it
up locally (especially since I have a media server now), so I stick
with Totem (I hate VLC's UI and mplayer is only really any good for
one offs; totem is codewise pretty heavy but at least the interface
makes sense).

OpenBSD on the desktop feels like a lot of compromises to me :( . If I
still got off from using the command line everywhere it wouldn't be a
problem but it is.

-Nick

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Re: What does your environment look like?

Jona Joachim-6
On 2010-01-04, Nick Guenther <[hidden email]> wrote:

> On Sun, Jan 3, 2010 at 3:01 AM, Tomas Bodzar <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> I use default fvwm(1) and I'm happy with that. I tried cwm(1) after
>> this post http://undeadly.org/cgi?action=article&sid=20090502141551
>> and I found it very clean and useful, but I still use fvwm(1). Anyway
>> I plan to try this one http://www.scrotwm.org/
>>
>
> I never figured out fvwm. It has multiple desktops and you can drag
> windows between them but it jumps them too far too easily. Tell me,
> what's the appeal? I'm willing to think I'm just not understanding it
> (though points should always be allotted for intuitiveness).
>
> I use wmii with a bunch of dmenu custom menus. I haven't found a file
> manager I like (xfe is the best so far, but it uses some weird custom
> toolkit, thunar is nice but really wants famd, which for some reason
> seems associated with trackerd spinning up and eating my CPU, the
> rox-filer in packages doesn't work right).

hmm, I've been using it for years, what is the problem with ROX?

> doesn't work everywhere, so I keep firefox and epiphany and galeon
> around (why is it that Gecko seems so much slower on OpenBSD than
> Linux?). I try to use mpd but sometimes I just don't bother to set it
> up locally (especially since I have a media server now), so I stick
> with Totem (I hate VLC's UI and mplayer is only really any good for
> one offs; totem is codewise pretty heavy but at least the interface
> makes sense).

I've recently discovered that smplayer is quite nice

> OpenBSD on the desktop feels like a lot of compromises to me :( . If I
> still got off from using the command line everywhere it wouldn't be a
> problem but it is.

nothing beats the command line ;)


Best regards,
Jona

--
Worse is better
    Richard P. Gabriel

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Re: What does your environment look like?

Predrag Punosevac-2
In reply to this post by Josh Rickmar-2
Brynet <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Hi,
>
> I know not everyone uses OpenBSD for a desktop OS,

I personally run only OpenBSD on all my desktops. I spend no less than
5 hours a day working on them and no I am not a software developer.
I must admit though I enjoy writing a nice AWK or a shell script.



> but I have been for
> nearly 5 years and I'm quite curious about some of your opinions? do you
>  embrace minimalism or pure aesthetics? are the two mutually exclusive?
>
> When I started using OpenBSD (..around 3.7) I was frequently switching
> between window managers, tweaking.. but for 2 years now I've been using
> fluxbox and I believe I'm comfortable with it.
>
> * Do you use one of the bundled window managers like
> cwm(1)/twm(1)/fvwm(1) or something else?

I was surprised to see how few cwm users responded to your message so
for the record I use cwm. My wife uses cwm. My children use cwm. We
switched from OpenBox around the time cwm became the part of the base.
We could not be happier.



> * What other utilities do you find useful, any "dockapps" or similar
> applets? personal customizations?

Please see for yourself

$ more .xsession
#!/bin/sh
xidle -program "/usr/X11R6/bin/xlock" -timeout 300 &
xclock -geometry -0+0 &
feh --bg-scale /home/predrag/Desktop/ocean.jpg &
exec cwm

$ more .Xdefaults
XTerm*loginShell: true
XTerm*faceName: Mono
XTerm*faceSize: 11
XTerm*background: black
XTerm*foreground: gray

Xft.antialias: true

XClock*analog:                          false
XClock*strftime:                        %T %A %e %B
XClock*face:                            ter-d12n
XClock*interval:                        1
XClock*margin:                          0
XClock*foreground:                      gray
XClock*background:                      black


$ more .cwmrc
# Turn on sticky-group mode
        sticky yes
# Any entry here is shown in the application menu
        command Opera           "opera"
        command Rox             "rox"
        command Ogle            "ogle"
        command Xfig            "xfig"
        command Xsane           "xsane"
        command Xcalc           "xcalc"  
# Keybindings
        bind CM-m       "xterm -e nail -A gmail"
        bind CM-space   "xterm -e nail -A gsu"
# Autogroup definitions
        autogroup 2     "xterm,XTerm"



> * Do you try to keep things uniform across other desktops?

Yes, I do synchronize my desktops with unison

http://www.cis.upenn.edu/~bcpierce/unison/


> * What does your environment look like? anyone willing to post
> screenshots or actual workspace photos?
>

There is nothing really to post. See my .xsession and .Xdefaults. For a
very long time I was using default gray X server with the xclock, the
xconsole, and a pile of xterms. My kids got me spoiled. Now I use eye
candy in a form of a nice wallpaper set by feh.

> I realize none of this may be relevant or even useful, but I figured it
> was worth asking here anyway.
>
> Anyone feel like humouring me? :-)
>
> Thanks.
> -Bryan.

You are welcome:-)
Predrag