OT: recommendations for a serial/USB UPS?

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OT: recommendations for a serial/USB UPS?

Vladas Urbonas
Hi List.

I am about to buy UPS, but would really appreciate your
opinions to make sure I throw money away in the right
direction.

1. Can I just assume that device will work reliably if it is
listed as supported in nut, upsd or apc-upsd? What should
I avoid buying? (All machines involved are running -stable)

2. Are there any problems with the ones that use serial port
for accessing status information? What might be the problems
with the USB ones?

3. Is the status information reliability/responsiveness decreasing
over time as device is getting old or the device just dies at once?

4. What are the ways the UPS device notifies about the fact
that it is becoming too old to use and that I should get a new
one?

5. Are there ways to monitor the UPS from two (or more) machines?

(self-made, three-head serial cable, right ;) ?


6. Which monitoring daemon should I prefer?


I do not want my network to get down due to unreliable UPSes,
hence all the questions. Google does not include production line
experiences, that is why I am asking you.


Would be grateful for any input.



Thank you for your time.

vladas

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Re: OT: recommendations for a serial/USB UPS?

Vladas Urbonas
> I am about to buy UPS, but would really appreciate your
> opinions to make sure I throw money away in the right
> direction.

Time is not on my side. I have got OMRON BX35F's.

(4.2 GENERIC #338)

/bsd: uhidev1 at uhub3 port 1 configuration 1 interface 0
/bsd:
/bsd: uhidev1: OMRON BX35F, rev 1.10/0.07, addr 2, iclass 3/0
/bsd: uhid0 at uhidev1: input=64, output=16, feature=0

Could please somebody enlighten me if usb upses need any
special treatment from kernel or it is all just about libusb (like
bluetooth afaik)?

> 1. Can I just assume that device will work reliably if it is
> listed as supported in nut, upsd or apc-upsd? What should
> I avoid buying? (All machines involved are running -stable)

I am looking forward to hear from nut-upsdev soon if there is
interest in the hw from their side.

> 5. Are there ways to monitor the UPS from two (or more) machines?
>
> (self-made, three-head serial cable, right ;) ?

What I have meant here is that I do _NOT_ want to run any
not-in-the-baseXX.tgz TCP services. Whether or not it is practical -
that is another question :)


Sorry for the noise if any.

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Re: OT: recommendations for a serial/USB UPS?

Rod Whitworth-3
On Sun, 19 Aug 2007 14:42:31 +0900, vladas wrote:

>> I am about to buy UPS, but would really appreciate your
>> opinions to make sure I throw money away in the right
>> direction.
>
>Time is not on my side. I have got OMRON BX35F's.
>
>(4.2 GENERIC #338)
>
>/bsd: uhidev1 at uhub3 port 1 configuration 1 interface 0
>/bsd:
>/bsd: uhidev1: OMRON BX35F, rev 1.10/0.07, addr 2, iclass 3/0
>/bsd: uhid0 at uhidev1: input=64, output=16, feature=0
>
>Could please somebody enlighten me if usb upses need any
>special treatment from kernel or it is all just about libusb (like
>bluetooth afaik)?
>
>> 1. Can I just assume that device will work reliably if it is
>> listed as supported in nut, upsd or apc-upsd? What should
>> I avoid buying? (All machines involved are running -stable)
>
>I am looking forward to hear from nut-upsdev soon if there is
>interest in the hw from their side.
>
>> 5. Are there ways to monitor the UPS from two (or more) machines?
>>
>> (self-made, three-head serial cable, right ;) ?
>
>What I have meant here is that I do _NOT_ want to run any
>not-in-the-baseXX.tgz TCP services. Whether or not it is practical -
>that is another question :)

You really should do a bit more reading of the readily available
information.
e.g. http://ports.openbsd.nu/sysutils/nut says:
" Nut also has a network communications layer that allows other
machines to
coordinate shutdowns with the machine that is physically attached to
the UPS."

Of course you would also look at the nut website and find:
http://www.networkupstools.org/client-projects/
which you can do your own research on.

Let your fingers do the walking....... on your keyboard.... before you
ask more questions.
This isn't really a misc@ question. ports@ or at the nut mail-list
would be best IMNSHO.



Rod/
From the land "down under": Australia.
Do we look <umop apisdn> from up over?

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Re: OT: recommendations for a serial/USB UPS?

Vladas Urbonas
> You really should do a bit more reading of the readily available
> information.
> e.g. http://ports.openbsd.nu/sysutils/nut says:
> " Nut also has a network communications layer that allows other

nut was mentioned in my post.

> machines to
> coordinate shutdowns with the machine that is physically attached to
> the UPS."

I have explained my question about network in the second post.

> Of course you would also look at the nut website and find:
> http://www.networkupstools.org/client-projects/
> which you can do your own research on.

I did see the compat list before asking.

> Let your fingers do the walking....... on your keyboard.... before you
> ask more questions.

Not to be not polite, but you are not answering any of
those questions either.

> This isn't really a misc@ question. ports@ or at the nut mail-list
> would be best IMNSHO.

Ok, point taken. I thought ports@ would not like it.

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Re: OT: recommendations for a serial/USB UPS?

Rod Whitworth-3
On Sun, 19 Aug 2007 16:33:58 +0900, vladas wrote:

>> You really should do a bit more reading of the readily available
>> information.
>> e.g. http://ports.openbsd.nu/sysutils/nut says:
>> " Nut also has a network communications layer that allows other
>
>nut was mentioned in my post.
>
>> machines to
>> coordinate shutdowns with the machine that is physically attached to
>> the UPS."
>
>I have explained my question about network in the second post.

And what, precisely, does nut use in the way of network functionality
that does not come with OpenBSD default install, other than nut itself?

>
>> Of course you would also look at the nut website and find:
>> http://www.networkupstools.org/client-projects/
>> which you can do your own research on.
>
>I did see the compat list before asking.
>
>> Let your fingers do the walking....... on your keyboard.... before you
>> ask more questions.
>
>Not to be not polite, but you are not answering any of
>those questions either.
You want a how-to? Run Linux.
I pointed you not at nut but at some extra information that you showed
no sign of knowing.

The best help you can get when it looks like you have not done enough
research is a pointer or two so that you find the answers for yourself.

If you do research and read the man pages and mail archives you'll
become self sufficient in less time. I AM assuming you have the
potential to do that. Those who don't seem to wither away in OpenBSD.

There will often be a reason to ask for help. It comes more readily
when the question is accompanied by evidence of what the person has
done to get to where s/he is. Often it's then just a clarification
that's needed, or evidence like log entries will allow a guru to spot
the problem.

>
>> This isn't really a misc@ question. ports@ or at the nut mail-list
>> would be best IMNSHO.
>
>Ok, point taken. I thought ports@ would not like it.
>
Well nut isn't part of the OS....... I'd try the nut list first - they
are the people who work on the app.

Good luck.

BTW I am subscribed to misc@ so you can save the hassle of CCing me.

Rod/
A consultant is someone who's called in when someone has painted himself into a corner.  He's expected to levitate his client out of that corner.

-The Sayings of Chairman Morrow. 1984.

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Re: OT: recommendations for a serial/USB UPS?

Vladas Urbonas
> You want a how-to? Run Linux.

I will run it if it will help to get this piece run with OpenBSD
as a result. There are only two systems supported by OEM: win32
and linux. The object files supplied are for linux only.

> I pointed you not at nut but at some extra information that you showed
> no sign of knowing.

Point taken, you are right.

> The best help you can get when it looks like you have not done enough
> research is a pointer or two so that you find the answers for yourself.
>
> If you do research and read the man pages and mail archives you'll
> become self sufficient in less time. I AM assuming you have the
> potential to do that. Those who don't seem to wither away in OpenBSD.

While you were typing this, one person have been kind enough
to give me very detailed directions on what to do next. No, wait. Not
one; three persons. Skip the emotions and focus on task.

> There will often be a reason to ask for help. It comes more readily
> when the question is accompanied by evidence of what the person has
> done to get to where s/he is. Often it's then just a clarification
> that's needed, or evidence like log entries will allow a guru to spot
> the problem.

I do not know who you are, but you do not have the guru attitude. I did
include "OT" in the subject. The rest - you are right completely.

I came to misc@ for technical information. If you want to school me, do
not send this noise to misc@, keep it private.

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Re: OT: recommendations for a serial/USB UPS?

J.C. Roberts
On Sunday 19 August 2007, vladas wrote:
> > There will often be a reason to ask for help. It comes more readily
> > when the question is accompanied by evidence of what the person has
> > done to get to where s/he is. Often it's then just a clarification
> > that's needed, or evidence like log entries will allow a guru to
> > spot the problem.
>
> I do not know who you are, but you do not have the guru attitude.

vladas,

It seems you are familiar with attitude of gurus from other mountains...

When someone is lucky enough to get help from any one of OpenBSD gurus,
the help is nearly always delivered in the form of pointing you to the
correct direction, and often includes the bonus of a swift, but
friendly, kick in the rear to help you get going on your merry way.

Surprisingly, the latter part of the "help" does increase your long term
memory of the event, the solution, and how to find the next solution on
your own. After a decade of being on the receiving end of such help, I
can tell you I've learned a lot from it, and continue to learn from it.

jcr