OT: quiet fans and heatsinks

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OT: quiet fans and heatsinks

Jacob Yocom-Piatt
i've got a few machines that have heatsinks and fans which are effective but
very loud. i would like to get some heatsinks and fans that are quiet, reliable
and reasonably priced. this has become a priority now that i've moved one of
these machines to my home and keep it in my bedroom.

these machines need Socket A and Socket 370 heatsinks. it's a plus if they're
low profile for 1U and 2U rackmount units. all suggestions appreciated.

cheers,
jake

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Re: OT: quiet fans and heatsinks

Jean-Jacques Roh
Jacob Yocom-Piatt wrote:

> i've got a few machines that have heatsinks and fans which are effective but
> very loud. i would like to get some heatsinks and fans that are quiet, reliable
> and reasonably priced. this has become a priority now that i've moved one of
> these machines to my home and keep it in my bedroom.
>
> these machines need Socket A and Socket 370 heatsinks. it's a plus if they're
> low profile for 1U and 2U rackmount units. all suggestions appreciated.
>
> cheers,
> jake
>
>
try this : http://www.quietpc.com/

cheers

JJR

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Re: OT: quiet fans and heatsinks

J.C. Roberts-2
In reply to this post by Jacob Yocom-Piatt
On Sun, 4 Jun 2006 21:43:25 -0500, Jacob Yocom-Piatt <[hidden email]>
wrote:

>i've got a few machines that have heatsinks and fans which are effective but
>very loud. i would like to get some heatsinks and fans that are quiet, reliable
>and reasonably priced. this has become a priority now that i've moved one of
>these machines to my home and keep it in my bedroom.
>
>these machines need Socket A and Socket 370 heatsinks. it's a plus if they're
>low profile for 1U and 2U rackmount units. all suggestions appreciated.
>
>cheers,
>jake

Hi Jake,

Most people just don't get it. The equation is simple:

  HEAT * TIME

Thermal breakdown occurs over time. The longer you have the heat, the
sooner things will fail. Loud, constantly running fans are a very very
"Good Thing" (TM), since even if there is little heat for them to
dissipate you are still helping to reduce the effect of the HEAT * TIME
equation.

It might sound strange, but the above is also very important for hard
drives. If you keep them cool, they will run for far longer than if you
let stay at a constant warm temp. EMC, NetApp and others which deal with
very large concentrations of hard drives have all done (unreleased,
internal) testing which proves for each degree above some minimum value,
the MTBF of a hard drive is decreased by 50%.

The annoyance of a constantly running fan is far less than the annoyance
of constantly replacing failed hardware.

JCR


--
Free, Open Source CAD, CAM and EDA Tools
http://www.DesignTools.org

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Re: OT: quiet fans and heatsinks

Rod.. Whitworth
On Mon, 05 Jun 2006 02:25:21 -0700, J.C. Roberts wrote:

>On Sun, 4 Jun 2006 21:43:25 -0500, Jacob Yocom-Piatt <[hidden email]>
>wrote:
>
>>i've got a few machines that have heatsinks and fans which are effective but
>>very loud. i would like to get some heatsinks and fans that are quiet, reliable
>>and reasonably priced. this has become a priority now that i've moved one of
>>these machines to my home and keep it in my bedroom.
>>
>>these machines need Socket A and Socket 370 heatsinks. it's a plus if they're
>>low profile for 1U and 2U rackmount units. all suggestions appreciated.
>>
>>cheers,
>>jake
>
>Hi Jake,
>
>Most people just don't get it. The equation is simple:
>
>  HEAT * TIME
>
>Thermal breakdown occurs over time. The longer you have the heat, the
>sooner things will fail. Loud, constantly running fans are a very very
>"Good Thing" (TM), since even if there is little heat for them to
>dissipate you are still helping to reduce the effect of the HEAT * TIME
>equation.
>
>It might sound strange, but the above is also very important for hard
>drives. If you keep them cool, they will run for far longer than if you
>let stay at a constant warm temp. EMC, NetApp and others which deal with
>very large concentrations of hard drives have all done (unreleased,
>internal) testing which proves for each degree above some minimum value,
>the MTBF of a hard drive is decreased by 50%.
>
>The annoyance of a constantly running fan is far less than the annoyance
>of constantly replacing failed hardware.
>
>JCR
>
>
>--
>Free, Open Source CAD, CAM and EDA Tools
>http://www.DesignTools.org
>
>

Ah yes. I agree BUT hopefully the OP is looking for a fan that does as
well as a noisy one whilst being much quieter.

There are some very noisy after-market units which a local magazine
tested on Intel mobos and they were found to be less capable than the
relatively quiet Intel fan that came with the CPU at no extra
cost....... To overclockers the roaring sound is their version of the
roar of a primate declaring his dominance.

I've always aimed at having a car with a quiet exhaust and really good
tyres that let me get across an intersection whilst the other guy is
still noisily saluting the green light.

The two quietest computers here are a DX4-100 and a P75. They run at
their max speed. Neither has a fan but I did give both good heat sinks.
Nearly 10 years of 24*7 ain't too bad?

From the land "down under": Australia.
Do we look <umop apisdn> from up over?

Do NOT CC me - I am subscribed to the list.
Replies to the sender address will fail except from the list-server.

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Re: OT: quiet fans and heatsinks

Damian Gerow
In reply to this post by J.C. Roberts-2
Thus spake J.C. Roberts ([hidden email]) [05/06/06 05:20]:
: Most people just don't get it. The equation is simple:
:
:   HEAT * TIME

And, as someone else has more elegantly pointed out:

COOL != LOUD

A well-designed cooling system can keep your system running cooler than with
stock hardware, all while generating much less noise.

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Re: OT: quiet fans and heatsinks

Christian Pedaschus
In reply to this post by Jacob Yocom-Piatt
Jacob Yocom-Piatt wrote:

>i've got a few machines that have heatsinks and fans which are effective but
>very loud. i would like to get some heatsinks and fans that are quiet, reliable
>and reasonably priced. this has become a priority now that i've moved one of
>these machines to my home and keep it in my bedroom.
>
>these machines need Socket A and Socket 370 heatsinks. it's a plus if they're
>low profile for 1U and 2U rackmount units. all suggestions appreciated.
>
>cheers,
>jake
>
>  
>
http://www.zalmanusa.com/

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Re: OT: quiet fans and heatsinks

J.C. Roberts-2
In reply to this post by Rod.. Whitworth
On Mon, 05 Jun 2006 19:41:42 +1000, "Rod.. Whitworth"
<[hidden email]> wrote:

>There are some very noisy after-market units which a local magazine
>tested on Intel mobos and they were found to be less capable than the
>relatively quiet Intel fan that came with the CPU at no extra
>cost....... To overclockers the roaring sound is their version of the
>roar of a primate declaring his dominance.

Rod is very much correct on this one. If you walk into your local
"consumer electronics" shop (i.e. Fry's), you'll see a plethora of
shiny, polished, chromed, plated and even neon colored crap for sale.
You can be reasonably well guaranteed that if it's pretty, then it's
probably unreliable.

Some Well Known Facts:

  * dark colors dissipate heat better than bright colors

  * a rough ugly surface dissipates heat better than a polished
    shiny or smooth surface

  * nearly all forms of metallic plating trap heat
    so if it's chromed or otherwise plated avoid it.

  * there are very few "bonding paints" which actually transfer
    heat from the metal through the paint. All other paints act
    like plating which traps heat. If you need to paint a heat
    dissipation device, go to the local auto store and get the
    ugly, flat black, high temp paint for exhaust systems. It's
    as close as you'll get without spending a mint for real
    bonding paints.

  * there are very few dye processes for aluminum (and alloys)
    which have a positive effect on heat transfer. The majority of
    the coloring processes used actually reduce heat dissipation.
    In other words, the fancy gold or blue colored aluminum heat
    sinks usually perform worse than their normal, plain aluminum
    counter parts.

  * the normal way to evaluate a fan is by the volume of air it
    can push. if the air the fan is moving is not removing heat,
    then there is little point in having one at all.

jcr


--
Free, Open Source CAD, CAM and EDA Tools
http://www.DesignTools.org

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Re: OT: quiet fans and heatsinks

J.C. Roberts-2
In reply to this post by Damian Gerow
On Mon, 5 Jun 2006 06:25:09 -0400, Damian Gerow <[hidden email]>
wrote:

>Thus spake J.C. Roberts ([hidden email]) [05/06/06 05:20]:
>: Most people just don't get it. The equation is simple:
>:
>:   HEAT * TIME
>
>And, as someone else has more elegantly pointed out:
>
>COOL != LOUD
>
>A well-designed cooling system can keep your system running cooler than with
>stock hardware, all while generating much less noise.

You're right that well designed cooling systems can make things run
cooler and with less noise but more importantly, there's only one way to
determine if various cooling systems are actually well designed; namely,
you have to go buy a stack of them and then test all of them in your
particular application... -and how do you find out if they are reliable?

In other words, you are only right when you have plenty of time and
money to waste... A set of cheap, loud, easily replaced, high volume
fans generally solves the problem in a more reliable fashion and with
far less time and expense. When you start dealing with tons of systems
(the OP, Jake, likes to work with clusters), buying tons of those custom
coolers can get way too expensive.

If it's just a home PeeCee just turn the darn thing off at night. On the
other hand, if you chose to sleep with high end servers running at full
bore, then you should expect to hear some degree of droning noise and
learn to ignore it... -kinda seems way too close to getting married. (;

jcr


--
Free, Open Source CAD, CAM and EDA Tools
http://www.DesignTools.org

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Re: OT: quiet fans and heatsinks

Damian Gerow
Thus spake J.C.Roberts ([hidden email]) [05/06/06 08:35]:
: You're right that well designed cooling systems can make things run
: cooler and with less noise but more importantly, there's only one way to
: determine if various cooling systems are actually well designed; namely,
: you have to go buy a stack of them and then test all of them in your
: particular application... -and how do you find out if they are reliable?

Funny.  I did a bunch of research for other's opinions on the Web, and the
first set of heatsink/fans I purchased turned out to be quiet, cool, and
reliable -- three years later, I'm still using the original fan I purchased.
All subsequent purchases from the same company (Zalman) have proven to be
pretty much exactly the same: quiet, cool, and reliable.

(This is my last contribution to this thread.  It's pretty off-topic, and
the original poster already has a few good leads on good cooling solutions.)

  - Damian

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Re: OT: quiet fans and heatsinks

Jacob Yocom-Piatt
In reply to this post by Jacob Yocom-Piatt
thanks a bunch for all the suggestions guys. i'll certainly try some of these
heatsinks out since the 7000 RPM low profile screamers in the machine in my
bedroom gave me a shitty night's sleep last night.

too much like being married ;)

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Re: OT: quiet fans and heatsinks

daniel.ramaley (Bugzilla)
In reply to this post by Jacob Yocom-Piatt
On Sunday 04 June 2006 21:43, Jacob Yocom-Piatt wrote:
>these machines need Socket A and Socket 370 heatsinks. it's a plus if
> they're low profile for 1U and 2U rackmount units. all suggestions
> appreciated.

What i've found works well is to buy a fan adapter that will allow you
to use a larger fan (such as a 60mm fan on a 40mm heatsink, 80mm fan on
a 60mm heatsink, or a 120mm fan on an 80mm heatsink). Then get a fan of
the larger size that uses magnetic levitation bearings (they tend to be
considerably quieter than ball bearing fans, though slightly more
expensive). Then get an adapter for the fan that will run it at either
7 or 5 volts (Zalman sells some of these for roughly $3 US). So then
you use a larger fan, but run it at a slower speed. It will end up
pushing about as much air as a small fan at high speed, but make a lot
less noise doing it. I recently managed to make a system almost silent
this way; i can still hear it (mostly the hard drive noise) if my head
is within a foot of the case but otherwise cannot.
--
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Dan Ramaley                            Dial Center 118, Drake University
Network Programmer/Analyst             2407 Carpenter Ave
+1 515 271-4540                        Des Moines IA 50311 USA

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Re: OT: quiet fans and heatsinks

tony sarendal
On 06/06/06, Daniel A. Ramaley <[hidden email]> wrote:

>
> On Sunday 04 June 2006 21:43, Jacob Yocom-Piatt wrote:
> >these machines need Socket A and Socket 370 heatsinks. it's a plus if
> > they're low profile for 1U and 2U rackmount units. all suggestions
> > appreciated.
>
> What i've found works well is to buy a fan adapter that will allow you
> to use a larger fan (such as a 60mm fan on a 40mm heatsink, 80mm fan on
> a 60mm heatsink, or a 120mm fan on an 80mm heatsink). Then get a fan of
> the larger size that uses magnetic levitation bearings (they tend to be
> considerably quieter than ball bearing fans, though slightly more
> expensive). Then get an adapter for the fan that will run it at either
> 7 or 5 volts (Zalman sells some of these for roughly $3 US). So then
> you use a larger fan, but run it at a slower speed. It will end up
> pushing about as much air as a small fan at high speed, but make a lot
> less noise doing it. I recently managed to make a system almost silent
> this way; i can still hear it (mostly the hard drive noise) if my head
> is within a foot of the case but otherwise cannot.



New ear phones and "vulgar display of power" with Pantera also does
the trick. My old ultra10's seemed really quiet, and as a bonus my
manager stopped asking questions across the office.

/Tony

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Re: OT: quiet fans and heatsinks

Christian Pedaschus
tony sarendal wrote:

>New ear phones and "vulgar display of power" with Pantera also does
>the trick. My old ultra10's seemed really quiet, and as a bonus my
>manager stopped asking questions across the office.
>
>/Tony
>  
>
ROTFL :)