No slip anymore?

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No slip anymore?

Roderick
I note that slattach disappered, ldattach do not support slip.
Is it not anymore possible?

Slip was, as I remember, the easiest way to connect two computers
in a network. I used it for example to transfer files from old
computers with serial ports (instead for example of xmodem).

I was just thinking to buy a computer in a stick and immediately
though on slip. Any experience with OpenBSD and such sticks?

Rodrigo.

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Re: No slip anymore?

Chris Cappuccio
Roderick [[hidden email]] wrote:

> I note that slattach disappered, ldattach do not support slip.
> Is it not anymore possible?
>
> Slip was, as I remember, the easiest way to connect two computers
> in a network. I used it for example to transfer files from old
> computers with serial ports (instead for example of xmodem).
>
> I was just thinking to buy a computer in a stick and immediately
> though on slip. Any experience with OpenBSD and such sticks?
>

I think modern computers, even on sticks, generally come with wireless and/or
ethernet interfaces? But don't fear, if you only have a serial port, you can
still use pppd for IP networking.

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Re: No slip anymore?

Roderick
On Sat, 4 Jun 2016, Chris Cappuccio wrote:

> I think modern computers, even on sticks, generally come with wireless and/or
> ethernet interfaces?

The Lenovo Stick has Wlan (and Bluetooth). But it is an exageration to
use it to comunicate with a very old laptop (without wlan) immediately
near it. The more power consumption, the more heat in the small stick.

> But don't fear, if you only have a serial port, you can
> still use pppd for IP networking.

Yes, it is an alternative, but slip is not only simple for dealing
with its commands, but a very simple protocoll (see for example minix
man page). I wonder why its prensense in OpenBSD was considered a problem.

Rodrigo.

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Re: No slip anymore?

Theo de Raadt
> > But don't fear, if you only have a serial port, you can
> > still use pppd for IP networking.
>
> Yes, it is an alternative, but slip is not only simple for dealing
> with its commands, but a very simple protocoll (see for example minix
> man page). I wonder why its prensense in OpenBSD was considered a problem.

because.

.... now please go back to minix.

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Re: No slip anymore?

Roderick
On Wed, 8 Jun 2016, Theo de Raadt wrote:

> .... now please go back to minix.

Small memory footprint (kernel is 600 kB; full OS is 25 MB).

If you have a very old laptop with a comfortable keyboard, then
minix is a good alternative to use the laptop for example as a
typewriter (and much more than that).

And I find slip for connecting the old laptop to other computers,
for example running OpenBSD, to make file transfer, also because of
its simplicity, the right protocol. Secure connections are not
always everything.

I would not underestimate minix only because it has not the same
goals or quality standards than OpenBSD.

Rodrigo.

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Re: No slip anymore?

Kamil Cholewiński
On Wed, 08 Jun 2016, Roderick <[hidden email]> wrote:
> If you have a very old laptop with a comfortable keyboard, then
> minix is a good alternative to use the laptop for example as a
> typewriter (and much more than that).

Does your typewriter with 32 MB of RAM have Ethernet?
I remember occasionally browsing the interwebs on one,
as late as 2006.

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Re: No slip anymore?

Francois Pussault-2
In reply to this post by Roderick
Hello,

You may try to get a linux/other BSD  distro including slip
or add slip from sources over an openBSD installation.

or use pppd from ip networking as mentionned.


> ----------------------------------------
> From: Roderick <[hidden email]>
> Sent: Wed Jun 08 08:20:15 CEST 2016
> To: <[hidden email]>
> Subject: Re: No slip anymore?
>
>
> On Sat, 4 Jun 2016, Chris Cappuccio wrote:
>
> > I think modern computers, even on sticks, generally come with wireless
and/or

> > ethernet interfaces?
>
> The Lenovo Stick has Wlan (and Bluetooth). But it is an exageration to
> use it to comunicate with a very old laptop (without wlan) immediately
> near it. The more power consumption, the more heat in the small stick.
>
> > But don't fear, if you only have a serial port, you can
> > still use pppd for IP networking.
>
> Yes, it is an alternative, but slip is not only simple for dealing
> with its commands, but a very simple protocoll (see for example minix
> man page). I wonder why its prensense in OpenBSD was considered a problem.
>
> Rodrigo.
>


Cordialement
Francois Pussault
10 chemin de négo saoumos
apt 202 - bat 2
31300 Toulouse
+33 6 17 230 820   +33 5 34 365 269
[hidden email]

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Re: No slip anymore?

Roderick
In reply to this post by Kamil Cholewiński
On Wed, 8 Jun 2016, Kamil Cholewiñski wrote:

> Does your typewriter with 32 MB of RAM have Ethernet?
> I remember occasionally browsing the interwebs on one,
> as late as 2006.

The typewriter I am using now has 64 MB Ram and a normal installation
of OpenBSD 4.8. I suspect also a normal installation of OpenBSD 5.9
would run (I do not change a working typewriter). But see this:

>>
What are the minimum system requirements for flashrd?

     flashrd boots within 64MB RAM and 1GB flash hosting a default
OpenBSD/i386 or Open BSD/amd64 installation.
<<

(From http://www.nmedia.net/flashrd/flashrd-faq.html)

And this is flashrd:

>>
flashrd creates OpenBSD images tailored for embedded hardware devices
[sic!] ...
<<

(From http://www.nmedia.net/flashrd/)

I used minix in a computer with 4 MB ram. Of course, I do not compare
minix with OpenBSD. Apples with pears.

And no, for todays heavy web 32 MB Ram is not enough. You need a modern
browser: very few working alternatives, all bloat.

Rodrigo.