NEW: sysutils/multitime

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NEW: sysutils/multitime

Laurence Tratt
I've put a port for sysutils/multitime into openbsd-wip [1]. From the DESCR:

  Unix's 'time' utility is a simple and often effective way of measuring how
  long a command takes to run ('wall time'). Unfortunately, running a command
  once can give misleading timings: the process may create a cache on its first
  execution, running faster subsequently; other processes may cause the command
  to be starved of CPU or IO time; etc. It is common to see people run 'time'
  several times and take whichever values they feel most comfortable with.
  Inevitably, this causes problems.

  multitime is, in essence, a simple extension to time which runs a command
  multiple times and prints the timing means, standard deviations, mins,
  medians, and maxes having done so. This can give a much better understanding
  of the command's performance.

As well its more advanced features, multitime also has the advantage that it
can be used as a drop-in replacement for /usr/bin/time. More at
<http://tratt.net/laurie/src/multitime/>.

This was developed on OpenBSD and has been heavily tested on amd64. Reports
from other architectures, and general comments and questions are welcome!


Laurie

[1] https://github.com/jasperla/openbsd-wip/tree/master/sysutils/multitime
--
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Re: NEW: sysutils/multitime

Stuart Henderson
On 2012/09/25 21:42, Laurence Tratt wrote:

> I've put a port for sysutils/multitime into openbsd-wip [1]. From the DESCR:
>
>   Unix's 'time' utility is a simple and often effective way of measuring how
>   long a command takes to run ('wall time'). Unfortunately, running a command
>   once can give misleading timings: the process may create a cache on its first
>   execution, running faster subsequently; other processes may cause the command
>   to be starved of CPU or IO time; etc. It is common to see people run 'time'
>   several times and take whichever values they feel most comfortable with.
>   Inevitably, this causes problems.
>
>   multitime is, in essence, a simple extension to time which runs a command
>   multiple times and prints the timing means, standard deviations, mins,
>   medians, and maxes having done so. This can give a much better understanding
>   of the command's performance.
>
> As well its more advanced features, multitime also has the advantage that it
> can be used as a drop-in replacement for /usr/bin/time. More at
> <http://tratt.net/laurie/src/multitime/>.
>
> This was developed on OpenBSD and has been heavily tested on amd64. Reports
> from other architectures, and general comments and questions are welcome!

Port is OK sthen@ if someone would like to import.

Can I recommend including the autoconf input file in the next release?