Multi Link PPP support in Kernel

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Multi Link PPP support in Kernel

Russell Sutherland
Is it possible to enable multilink PPP using the kernel based: pppoe(4) ?
Or does one have to resort to the userland pppoe/ppp(8) ?

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Russell Sutherand  I+TS
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Re: Multi Link PPP support in Kernel

Stuart Henderson
On 2011-11-17, Russell Sutherland <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Is it possible to enable multilink PPP using the kernel based: pppoe(4) ?

no, not supported.

> Or does one have to resort to the userland pppoe/ppp(8) ?

wow, people really still use multilink?  i remember it being a fair
hassle on the lns side back when we did it with dialup... over here (UK)
the few people doing this sort of thing use per-packet IP load-balancing
these days.

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Re: Multi Link PPP support in Kernel

Scott McEachern-2
On 11/17/11 19:43, Stuart Henderson wrote:
> wow, people really still use multilink? i remember it being a fair
> hassle on the lns side back when we did it with dialup... over here
> (UK) the few people doing this sort of thing use per-packet IP
> load-balancing these days.

Over here (Canada; Ontario specifically), where Russell and I are both
located, the copper is owned by Bell Canada, a private company.  They
resell their bandwidth to independent ISPs, but *everyone* is stuck with
the throttling that Bell applies during certain hours of the day.

You mentioned dialup.  Bell's throttle drops P2P traffic to the speed of
a 56k modem, and to 28.8k during the most restrictive hours.

I can't speak to Russell's reasons for using MLPPP, but myself and many
others that use independent ISPs use MLPPP to evade the throttle.  I
don't know the technical details behind how it works, but it's currently
the only way to get around Bell's throttle.  Most people use the
"Tomato" firmware on their modems, but OpenBSD does it perfectly for me. :)

- Scott