Lesser evil

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Lesser evil

- -
Hello all,


I am running OpenBSD on my desktop, which is suitable for 99% of my
needs. However I have to run certain proprietary software, which is
available on Linux, Mac OSX and Windows.

I cannot decide which of the three would be a "lesser evil" to run in
respect with security and privacy. The software (video and photo editing)
runs best on Windows, almost as good on OSX  and it runs on Linux with
some compromises.
Does it make sense to accept such compromises and run Linux for security
and privacy OR is the better security and privacy of Linux more or less a
myth and running Windows would be almost the same in that respect?

I understand that any response is to be just an opinion.

Thank you

Jan
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Re: Lesser evil

Mentesan
If you really need it, go with what's best for it.

Today, to be honest, in your situation I'd run Windows, Linux will have
probably half the performance, and the "compromises" you cited.
Besides, you can also run Linux on Windows almost natively nowadays, so,
the choice is clear.

Install a good antivirus, try to be smart and you'll be fine (almost).
That's my 2 cents.

Regards,

On Mon, Sep 3, 2018 at 4:09 PM - - <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Hello all,
>
>
> I am running OpenBSD on my desktop, which is suitable for 99% of my
> needs. However I have to run certain proprietary software, which is
> available on Linux, Mac OSX and Windows.
>
> I cannot decide which of the three would be a "lesser evil" to run in
> respect with security and privacy. The software (video and photo editing)
> runs best on Windows, almost as good on OSX  and it runs on Linux with
> some compromises.
> Does it make sense to accept such compromises and run Linux for security
> and privacy OR is the better security and privacy of Linux more or less a
> myth and running Windows would be almost the same in that respect?
>
> I understand that any response is to be just an opinion.
>
> Thank you
>
> Jan
>
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Re: Lesser evil

salanimi
On September 3, 2018 3:20:11 PM EDT, Fabio Almeida <[hidden email]> wrote:

>If you really need it, go with what's best for it.
>
>Today, to be honest, in your situation I'd run Windows, Linux will have
>probably half the performance, and the "compromises" you cited.
>Besides, you can also run Linux on Windows almost natively nowadays,
>so,
>the choice is clear.
>
>Install a good antivirus, try to be smart and you'll be fine (almost).
>That's my 2 cents.
>
>Regards,
>
>On Mon, Sep 3, 2018 at 4:09 PM - - <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>> Hello all,
>>
>>
>> I am running OpenBSD on my desktop, which is suitable for 99% of my
>> needs. However I have to run certain proprietary software, which is
>> available on Linux, Mac OSX and Windows.
>>
>> I cannot decide which of the three would be a "lesser evil" to run in
>> respect with security and privacy. The software (video and photo
>editing)
>> runs best on Windows, almost as good on OSX  and it runs on Linux
>with
>> some compromises.
>> Does it make sense to accept such compromises and run Linux for
>security
>> and privacy OR is the better security and privacy of Linux more or
>less a
>> myth and running Windows would be almost the same in that respect?
>>
>> I understand that any response is to be just an opinion.
>>
>> Thank you
>>
>> Jan
>>

In my experience it has been easiest just to learn new software. Fewer softwares are ported to OpenBSD, but I generally prefer those that happen to have been ported to OpenBSD.

For the uses you describe, I recommend ffmpeg, ImageMagick, and a build tool (for example, make).
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Re: Lesser evil

Christopher Turkel
It always depends on your needs. I use LibreOffice for my work so I'm ste.

On Mon, Sep 3, 2018 at 3:39 PM Sal A Nimi <[hidden email]> wrote:

> On September 3, 2018 3:20:11 PM EDT, Fabio Almeida <[hidden email]>
> wrote:
> >If you really need it, go with what's best for it.
> >
> >Today, to be honest, in your situation I'd run Windows, Linux will have
> >probably half the performance, and the "compromises" you cited.
> >Besides, you can also run Linux on Windows almost natively nowadays,
> >so,
> >the choice is clear.
> >
> >Install a good antivirus, try to be smart and you'll be fine (almost).
> >That's my 2 cents.
> >
> >Regards,
> >
> >On Mon, Sep 3, 2018 at 4:09 PM - - <[hidden email]> wrote:
> >
> >> Hello all,
> >>
> >>
> >> I am running OpenBSD on my desktop, which is suitable for 99% of my
> >> needs. However I have to run certain proprietary software, which is
> >> available on Linux, Mac OSX and Windows.
> >>
> >> I cannot decide which of the three would be a "lesser evil" to run in
> >> respect with security and privacy. The software (video and photo
> >editing)
> >> runs best on Windows, almost as good on OSX  and it runs on Linux
> >with
> >> some compromises.
> >> Does it make sense to accept such compromises and run Linux for
> >security
> >> and privacy OR is the better security and privacy of Linux more or
> >less a
> >> myth and running Windows would be almost the same in that respect?
> >>
> >> I understand that any response is to be just an opinion.
> >>
> >> Thank you
> >>
> >> Jan
> >>
>
> In my experience it has been easiest just to learn new software. Fewer
> softwares are ported to OpenBSD, but I generally prefer those that happen
> to have been ported to OpenBSD.
>
> For the uses you describe, I recommend ffmpeg, ImageMagick, and a build
> tool (for example, make).
>
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Re: Lesser evil

Roderick

On Mon, 3 Sep 2018, Christopher Turkel wrote:

> It always depends on your needs. I use LibreOffice for my work so I'm ste.

I am happy that TeX is enough for my needs and do not need strange OS.

And in extreme cases he will have to use Windows / MacOS / Linux.

It is a reality: there is not a free software alternative for everything.
Windows is unfortunately wide spread in industry. Emulators (Wine) do
not work well. Perhaps a virtual machine?

Rodrigo

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Re: Lesser evil

STeve Andre'-2
In reply to this post by - -


On 09/03/18 14:42, - - wrote:

> Hello all,
>
>
> I am running OpenBSD on my desktop, which is suitable for 99% of my
> needs. However I have to run certain proprietary software, which is
> available on Linux, Mac OSX and Windows.
>
> I cannot decide which of the three would be a "lesser evil" to run in
> respect with security and privacy. The software (video and photo editing)
> runs best on Windows, almost as good on OSX  and it runs on Linux with
> some compromises.
> Does it make sense to accept such compromises and run Linux for security
> and privacy OR is the better security and privacy of Linux more or less a
> myth and running Windows would be almost the same in that respect?
>
> I understand that any response is to be just an opinion.
>
> Thank you
>
> Jan
>
I would not try to dual boot Windows and OpenBSD.  There are too
many disgusting viri out that smash parts of partitions.   OpenBSD
or anything else on the disk is a sitting duck once not active. Don't
do it.  The AV situation on Windows is out of control--a conservative
estimate is that there are 4M pieces of malware out for Windows.
If your AV software knows how to deal with 98%, that means 80K
things aren't dealt with.  Ugh!  I know of a dual booting Win/Obsd
laptop that was damaged by a viri and afterwards the owner could
not find the OpenBSD partition at all.  Pity I was never able to see it
to do analysis.

Here in the US, you can get used thinkpads for an astonishing small
amount of money.  My wife just got a T430 with 8G ram, 500G disk,
2.6GHz I5, 1366x768 display, 2 USB 3 ports, for $167.  The battery is
even decent.  This is at Newegg.   Used macs look like $400.

For that money I would advocate that a separate machine is best,
AND you have an emergency OpenBSD backup system.

--STeve

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Re: Lesser evil

Peter Nicolai Mathias Hansteen
In reply to this post by - -

On 09/03/18 20:42, - - wrote:

> I am running OpenBSD on my desktop, which is suitable for 99% of my
> needs. However I have to run certain proprietary software, which is
> available on Linux, Mac OSX and Windows.
>
> I cannot decide which of the three would be a "lesser evil" to run in
> respect with security and privacy. The software (video and photo editing)
> runs best on Windows, almost as good on OSX  and it runs on Linux with
> some compromises.

This really boils down to your degree of familiarity (or lack of
disgust) with each of the alternatives. I recently found myself in a
similar situation.

I run OpenBSD as my primary OS and set that up whenever there is not a
spesific reason to go for something else, including of course on my
primary laptop (blogged about not too long ago, you'll find it if you're
interested).

There is a specific piece of software that turned out to be available
only on Windows and MacOS, Linux was not an option, neither (of course)
was OpenBSD. Macs are more expensive than similar-specced hardware from
other sources, but I'm reasonably happy with going for a Mac (MacBook
Air) in that context. The system lacks most of the oddities that I have
found irritating in Windows over the years, and it comes well tuned to
Apple's hardware.

But that's me and I'm well aware that I'm weird. If you find Windows
tolerable and that's where the specific software runs best, that sounds
like the obvious choice.

- Peter

--
Peter N. M. Hansteen, member of the first RFC 1149 implementation team
http://bsdly.blogspot.com/ http://www.bsdly.net/ http://www.nuug.no/
"Remember to set the evil bit on all malicious network traffic"
delilah spamd[29949]: 85.152.224.147: disconnected after 42673 seconds.

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Re: Lesser evil

Roderick

On Tue, 4 Sep 2018, Peter N. M. Hansteen wrote:

> There is a specific piece of software that turned out to be available
> only on Windows and MacOS, Linux was not an option, neither (of course)
> was OpenBSD.

Or, for example, only in Windoze, because it is a very specific software
delivered with a very specific product of a very specific company.

If you need Windoze, you will have to use Windoze. I am lucky and do
not need it (till now).

Rodrigo

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Re: Lesser evil

Kevin Chadwick-4
In reply to this post by STeve Andre'-2
On Mon, 3 Sep 2018 18:03:06 -0400


> I would not try to dual boot Windows and OpenBSD.  There are too
> many disgusting viri out that smash parts of partitions.   OpenBSD
> or anything else on the disk is a sitting duck once not active. Don't
> do it.  The AV situation on Windows is out of control--a conservative
> estimate is that there are 4M pieces of malware out for Windows.

Personally I feel this is a red herring. If you are finding viri on
your system then OpenBSD helps but could be hacked too. Viri are
unlikely with a security conscious OpenBSD user. You are doing
something wrong or need to silo your actions.

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Re: Lesser evil

Kevin Chadwick-4
In reply to this post by - -
On Mon, 3 Sep 2018 14:42:39 -0400 (EDT)


> Does it make sense to accept such compromises and run Linux for
> security and privacy OR is the better security and privacy of Linux
> more or less a myth and running Windows would be almost the same in
> that respect?
>
> I understand that any response is to be just an opinion.

https://www.openbsd.org/papers/ru13-deraadt/mgp00030.html

Now, I used to think Linux had a more secure package system or
userland but then you are relying on debian or communities for that and
there are plenty of threads that suggest that these repositories aren't
as secure as you may think.

Atleast with Windows you have a good idea before you install what risks
you are taking even in a bad case of some ancient sha1 signed file from
a http link. With OpenBSD, I hope that the packaging community is
security conscious.

I tried OpenBSD with Linux for a work package but have found that
OpenBSD gives me great UNIX and security for most and all general tasks
and Windows gets best support, latest software features/options and
actually with Windows 10 a more secure kernel than Linux and with a
smart user, a reliable secure system. It also comes with native OpenSSH
and LibreSSL! by default in version 1803 and has the built-in option of
windows subsystem for linux.

Windows updates do still take way too long though and perhaps they are
gathering usage information, not that I care much. I hear they are
working on the speed in insider previews.

I enabled as many additional mitigations for Chrome as possible in
Windows 10 but Chrome broke with the latest update...doh.

As for MAC, I have little experience but I know someone who shelled out
a small fortune and I had to spend time working out how to
manually update the thing from/to Lion or something (no obvious warnings
and no upto date browser could be installed) only to find out support
would stop far sooner than if he had gone with Windows. Windows 7
update used to fail, though browser support far less likely to be
pulled. I am yet to see update failure with Windows 10. A blue screen
may be more likely with Windows supporting so much hardware, of course.

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Re: Lesser evil

Allan Streib-2
Kevin Chadwick <[hidden email]> writes:

> Windows updates do still take way too long though and perhaps they are
> gathering usage information, not that I care much. I hear they are
> working on the speed in insider previews.

Windows 10 has a lot of telemetry and data collection that sends
information back to Microsoft. It can be disabled. This is easier with
Enterprise Edition. You might consider the LTSB branch if you are under
a volume license agreement. Those releases do not include Windows Store,
Cortana, or most of the pre-installed applications. They get security
updates, but no new features.

Allan

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Re: Lesser evil

Chris Bennett-4
In reply to this post by Kevin Chadwick-4
On Tue, Sep 04, 2018 at 01:35:05PM +0000, Kevin Chadwick wrote:

> Atleast with Windows you have a good idea before you install what risks
> you are taking even in a bad case of some ancient sha1 signed file from
> a http link. With OpenBSD, I hope that the packaging community is
> security conscious.
>
> I tried OpenBSD with Linux for a work package but have found that
> OpenBSD gives me great UNIX and security for most and all general tasks
> and Windows gets best support, latest software features/options and
> actually with Windows 10 a more secure kernel than Linux and with a
> smart user, a reliable secure system. It also comes with native OpenSSH
> and LibreSSL! by default in version 1803 and has the built-in option of
> windows subsystem for linux.
>
> Windows updates do still take way too long though and perhaps they are
> gathering usage information, not that I care much. I hear they are
> working on the speed in insider previews.
>

Yes, not only do they take way too long, but each major update has
failed about 15 times before success (for me at least) .
That has cost me hours and hours of wasted time.
Even working in the background, it uses up all of my
bandwidth so completely that I am unable to even get any other work
done, i.e. YouTubeTV through Chrome, forget it.
More disturbing, I have absolutely no choice about when an update is
actually started. Just turn it on and wait hours for access. Especially
if I wanted to just start Putty, check email and fly out the door.

Windows 10 does send a lot of usage data, but they still refuse to fully
disclose what that exactly is or to whom they share it with. No, no, bad
Microsoft!

Plus, being closed source, why assume that they can't fully read and
write ALL filesystems? They don't need to tell us that. That would, from
a fully business point of view (not a paranoid view), possibly reduce
Windows usage. More people, due to the file sharing problem, would be
likely to just stay with Windows. That is good business and I don't
blame them for that at all. But security-wise, it's also worrisome.

I first heard about them working on speeding up updates, but that was a
long time ago and still nothing done.

So, both for financial (as in not a lot of disposable income) and really
wanting the speed of the built-in hard drive in my laptop, I
successfully ditched Windows 10 yesterday. I'm thrilled about how great
OpenBSD -current is running.
I'm also sad that I can't run things like Netflix, YouTubeTV, Amazon
Prime Video and some other stuff now. But between my Android phone and
Amazon Fire 5 tablet, I can do that stuff anyway, so not really a big
loss.

I'm a bit paranoid, too. I freely admit it. I also might be too
paranoid. Oh well.

But I also agree, if you need to run a particular OS for your software,
go for it. We all need to get things done at home and at work. Use
whatever works. Never forget, OpenBSD had two remote access bugs. What
will number three turn out to be? Could be serious or still unknown
right now. So, no OS is perfect and no hardware is perfect either.
IMHO, I'm very happy with my choice, but you don't need to follow my
choices at all.

Good luck and have good success,
Chris Bennett


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Re: Lesser evil

Kevin Chadwick-4
On Tue, 4 Sep 2018 09:00:11 -0700


> Amazon
> Prime Video and some other stuff now. But between my Android phone and
> Amazon Fire 5 tablet, I can do that stuff anyway, so not really a big
> loss.

If I can get it done easily on OpenBSD, I do.

WRT Amazon prime I have found that they drop the video quality options
significantly for Android no matter what monitor is connected... really
annoying. Not sure about firestick. I guess they think there is no point
on a tiny phone screen but you really see the compression on a big
screen. Some like ALL4 don't allow casting and Sky only allow HDMI out
on Windows. I find Linux browser GPU support (Netflix) to be quite poor
too even when h264 acceleration is meant to be supported and I have
tried Intel a long time ago as well as AMD and Nvidia GPUs more
recently.

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Re: Lesser evil

STeve Andre'-2
In reply to this post by Kevin Chadwick-4


On 09/04/18 09:09, Kevin Chadwick wrote:

> On Mon, 3 Sep 2018 18:03:06 -0400
>
>
>> I would not try to dual boot Windows and OpenBSD.  There are too
>> many disgusting viri out that smash parts of partitions.   OpenBSD
>> or anything else on the disk is a sitting duck once not active. Don't
>> do it.  The AV situation on Windows is out of control--a conservative
>> estimate is that there are 4M pieces of malware out for Windows.
> Personally I feel this is a red herring. If you are finding viri on
> your system then OpenBSD helps but could be hacked too. Viri are
> unlikely with a security conscious OpenBSD user. You are doing
> something wrong or need to silo your actions.
>
>
Um, maybe I'm not writing well.  I'm talking about a dual-boot Windows
OpenBSD system, which gets a Windows virus, which wipes out the
disk.  Effectively asleep, OpenBSD gets creamed.   That's what I mean
about dual-booting being a risk.

--STeve Andre'

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Re: Lesser evil

Heinz Kampmann
--------------------------Gesendet: Dienstag, 04. September 2018 um 23:00
Uhr
Von: "STeve Andre'" <[hidden email]>
An: "Kevin Chadwick" <[hidden email]>, [hidden email]
Betreff: Re: Lesser evil
On 09/04/18 09:09, Kevin Chadwick wrote: Um, maybe I'm not writing well.
I'm talking about a dual-boot Windows
OpenBSD system, which gets a Windows virus, which wipes out the
disk.  Effectively asleep, OpenBSD gets creamed.   That's what I mean
about dual-booting being a risk. ---------------------------- Hi, I
understand you in that way, but I thougt win10 can�t read/write
ufs-partitions.Maybe I�am wrong. I use Windows for one program (PsyPrax),
cause I won�t run it in an emulation.I only trust in OpenBSD. Lean and
clean code shifts security - plus the extra worklike pledge, KARL, w^x
etc. ... and the most reviews praise the high quality codeof OpenBSD.
Sometimes I use win10 or mac high sierra for amazon prime. best wishes,Heinz
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Re: Lesser evil

STeve Andre'-2


On 09/04/18 20:04, Heinz Kampmann wrote:

> --------------------------
> *Gesendet:* Dienstag, 04. September 2018 um 23:00 Uhr
> *Von:* "STeve Andre'" <[hidden email]>
> *An:* "Kevin Chadwick" <[hidden email]>, [hidden email]
> *Betreff:* Re: Lesser evil
>
> On 09/04/18 09:09, Kevin Chadwick wrote:
> Um, maybe I'm not writing well.  I'm talking about a dual-boot Windows
> OpenBSD system, which gets a Windows virus, which wipes out the
> disk.  Effectively asleep, OpenBSD gets creamed.   That's what I mean
> about dual-booting being a risk.
> ----------------------------
> Hi,
> I understand you in that way, but I thougt win10 can´t read/write
> ufs-partitions.
> Maybe I´am wrong.
> I use Windows for one program (PsyPrax), cause I won´t run it in an
> emulation.
> I only trust in OpenBSD. Lean and clean code shifts security - plus
> the extra work
> like pledge, KARL, w^x etc. ... and the most reviews praise the high
> quality code
> of OpenBSD.
> Sometimes I use win10 or mac high sierra for amazon prime.
> best wishes,
> Heinz
Heinz,

Think disk, not partitions.  Smash the raw disk and it matters not
what was on it; it will be obliterated.  That's what some Win viri do.

--STeve Andre'

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Re: Lesser evil

Kevin Chadwick-4
In reply to this post by STeve Andre'-2
On Tue, 4 Sep 2018 17:00:07 -0400


> >> I would not try to dual boot Windows and OpenBSD.  There are too
> >> many disgusting viri out that smash parts of partitions.   OpenBSD
> >> or anything else on the disk is a sitting duck once not active.
> >> Don't do it.  The AV situation on Windows is out of control--a
> >> conservative estimate is that there are 4M pieces of malware out
> >> for Windows.  
> > Personally I feel this is a red herring. If you are finding viri on
> > your system then OpenBSD helps but could be hacked too. Viri are
> > unlikely with a security conscious OpenBSD user. You are doing
> > something wrong or need to silo your actions.
> >
> >  
> Um, maybe I'm not writing well.  I'm talking about a dual-boot Windows
> OpenBSD system, which gets a Windows virus, which wipes out the
> disk.  Effectively asleep, OpenBSD gets creamed.   That's what I mean
> about dual-booting being a risk.

Sorry, I was being terribly unclear.

I meant that an OpenBSD user using Windows should not get a virus or
could handle them if downloading illegal software. I am yet to see a
truly clever system entry in the press. They always rely on user
idiocy or poor setup. Whether Viri with these properties are the only
ones caught is another question.

Additionally I don't see the "think disk". If the partition is
intact then surely it is not difficult to fix and with some boot
loaders like GAG would likely be unaffected. It used to be the case
that the windows bootloader was needed for hibernate support but I
haven't seen that for a while. It is certainly true that the
bootloader/bios itself could be targeted. If something breaks
then at least you know.

The OpenBSD partition can be edited (not very safely) from Windows
and Linux but Viri are unlikely to do this unless an active attacker is
after you in which case you best be careful with OpenBSD too and
hacking not viri will be the worry with Windows also.

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Re: Lesser evil

Kevin Chadwick-4
On Wed, 5 Sep 2018 11:09:01 +0100


> If the partition is
> intact then surely it is not difficult to fix and with some boot
> loaders like GAG would likely be unaffected.

I should probably say that GAG won't work with UEFI. UEFI sucks in so
many ways and yet could have been great.

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Re: Lesser evil

Raul Miller
In reply to this post by Kevin Chadwick-4
On Wednesday, September 5, 2018, Kevin Chadwick <[hidden email]> wrote:

> I meant that an OpenBSD user using Windows should not get a virus or
> could handle them if downloading illegal software. I am yet to see a
> truly clever system entry in the press. They always rely on user
> idiocy or poor setup. Whether Viri with these properties are the only
> ones caught is another question.
>
> Additionally I don't see the "think disk". If the partition is
> intact then surely it is not difficult to fix and with some boot
> loaders like GAG would likely be unaffected. It used to be the case
> that the windows bootloader was needed for hibernate support but I
> haven't seen that for a while. It is certainly true that the
> bootloader/bios itself could be targeted. If something breaks
> then at least you know.

You are overlooking some important issues:

One has to do with the nature of the press — it’s primary audience has
little to no technical background, and reporters have little training
on machine design and implementation. They are not very capable of
describing truly clever system entry. Also, common events tend to not
be "news". [How often do you hear about any of the suffering from the
leading causes of mortality? Instead you mostly hear about the rare
events.]

Another has to do with counter measures—any effective malware
mechanism gets attention and *eventually* gets squashed. This is a
statistical issue, but there are some other implications -- hold that
thought.

Another issue has to do with the nature of bug reporting systems: as
the user population increases, they become overwhelmed. Approaches
which worked well when the user population was mostly well educated
college students don't work so well when the user population is mostly
not.

Yet another issue has to do with the nature of malware itself: it’s a
mix of taking advantage of design defects (which are never in short
supply) and social structures (which, ok, do partially adapt to the
pressures but also tend to be more than a little imperfect).

Anyways:

1) you don’t have adequate knowledge of what other people are going
through—you can’t.

2) eventually someone with adequate, relevant knowledge is going to
trip over a malware deployment.

Put different: disk wipes are being limited by social issues more than
by technical issues. Disk wipes with broad propagation probably gets
lots of people really upset. And [this year, at least] there's no
effective border control on malware vectors, so state actors aren't
going to be using such things unless they feel they're backed into a
corner where unleashing such problems seems to offer them a way
forwards. (Because their own people will get hit, also - both by the
malware itself and possibly by the reactions from other state actors.)

But that only holds for large scale malware deployments.

There's another possibility which involves being specifically
targeted. It's difficult to think what the motivations would be for
this, but that's not an actual obstacle. If this sort of thing
happens, it would rely on social structures for concealment (in other
words, its point might be to make you look stupid - so to defend
against this kind of thing you would have to be comfortable with
dealing with having people think you look stupid. For example.)  But,
hey, there's no such thing as bullies, right? On the positive side,
this sort of thing is statistically unlikely, for most people.

Anyways... generalities that are usually correct can't always be
correct. And, when debugging, you sort of have to consider a lot of
unlikely possibilities until you have the problem isolated and solved.
So you are going to see discussion here about possibilities which are
mostly irrelevant to you, but which still have some use in helping
people reason about the problems they encounter.

So: back to the disk-wipe malware (and most other malware). Good
backups limit the impact that. And, you need a diversity of backup
mechanisms to defend against the backups getting hit by malware.

So your computer got wiped out - if you've got several of them each
running different OSes, perhaps with some other partitioning, you just
switch to a different one. (And software developers - especially
low-level software developers - tend to crash their own systems a lot
already, so in that sense it might not seem like such a big deal. If
you are a developer, malware is really just a consequence of bad
design.)

Anyways, that's enough words from me to last you way way too long...

Sorry about that.

--
Raul

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Re: Lesser evil

Kevin Chadwick-4
On Wed, 5 Sep 2018 11:11:06 -0400


> So: back to the disk-wipe malware (and most other malware). Good
> backups limit the impact that. And, you need a diversity of backup
> mechanisms to defend against the backups getting hit by malware.

*yawn* This is nonsense!

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