Is Soekris OpenBSD friendly?

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Is Soekris OpenBSD friendly?

SmithS
Greetings misc@.  After coming across a link[1] to make an OpenBSD
router using a "Soekris" device, I think I will make one.  Does anyone
else have this hardware and can verify all the components work?
I think Intel NICs are good, but everything else?  I have never heard
of this brand before so I want to be safe before buying.  The model
number[2] is "6501-30"

[1] http://www.bsdnow.tv/tutorials/openbsd-router
[2] https://soekris.com/products/net6501/net6501-30-board-case.html

greetz,
SmithS

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Re: Is Soekris OpenBSD friendly?

Bryan Irvine
OpenBSD is listed under Software on the page you linked.  As I understand
it the people who developed CARP did it on Soekris hardware, and this demo
was done using soekris 4801's. (but don't quote me on that, my memory is
hazy).

https://web.archive.org/web/20060323025207/http://os.newsforge.com/os/06/01/02/1643229.shtml?tid=8&tid=18



On Fri, Nov 15, 2013 at 4:03 PM, SmithS <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Greetings misc@.  After coming across a link[1] to make an OpenBSD
> router using a "Soekris" device, I think I will make one.  Does anyone
> else have this hardware and can verify all the components work?
> I think Intel NICs are good, but everything else?  I have never heard
> of this brand before so I want to be safe before buying.  The model
> number[2] is "6501-30"
>
> [1] http://www.bsdnow.tv/tutorials/openbsd-router
> [2] https://soekris.com/products/net6501/net6501-30-board-case.html
>
> greetz,
> SmithS

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Re: Is Soekris OpenBSD friendly?

jordon-7
In reply to this post by SmithS
I have an old net4511 running 5.4.  It’s too old/slow to route but it’s too fun to not have running because how many other OS’es can run on a 486 100MHz with 32MB RAM?




On Nov 15, 2013, at 6:03 PM, SmithS <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Greetings misc@.  After coming across a link[1] to make an OpenBSD
> router using a "Soekris" device, I think I will make one.  Does anyone
> else have this hardware and can verify all the components work?
> I think Intel NICs are good, but everything else?  I have never heard
> of this brand before so I want to be safe before buying.  The model
> number[2] is "6501-30"
>
> [1] http://www.bsdnow.tv/tutorials/openbsd-router
> [2] https://soekris.com/products/net6501/net6501-30-board-case.html
>
> greetz,
> SmithS

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Re: Is Soekris OpenBSD friendly?

Richard Toohey
In reply to this post by SmithS
On 11/16/13 13:03, SmithS wrote:

> Greetings misc@.  After coming across a link[1] to make an OpenBSD
> router using a "Soekris" device, I think I will make one.  Does anyone
> else have this hardware and can verify all the components work?
> I think Intel NICs are good, but everything else?  I have never heard
> of this brand before so I want to be safe before buying.  The model
> number[2] is "6501-30"
>
> [1] http://www.bsdnow.tv/tutorials/openbsd-router
> [2] https://soekris.com/products/net6501/net6501-30-board-case.html
>
> greetz,
> SmithS
>
>
I've got a rack-mounted net6501-50 working well at the moment,
but I've only been using it for a few weeks so far.

Not sure "all" the components work, but it was easy to install
OpenBSD 5.3 to a USB stick, boot off that, then install to an SSD.

You have to connect with a serial cable, I've found a cheap USB->serial
adapter
connected to a null modem cable to work well.

Any issues I've had - Google has given the answers.  8-)

Also got a 5501 in use and that's been working well, too.

dmesg from the 6501:

$ dmesg
OpenBSD 5.3 (GENERIC) #0: Wed Aug 28 19:46:41 NZST 2013
     [hidden email]:/usr/src/sys/arch/i386/compile/GENERIC
cpu0: Genuine Intel(R) CPU @ 1.00GHz ("GenuineIntel" 686-class) 1.01 GHz
cpu0:
FPU,V86,DE,PSE,TSC,MSR,PAE,MCE,CX8,APIC,SEP,MTRR,PGE,MCA,CMOV,PAT,CFLUSH,DS,ACPI,MMX,FXSR,SSE,SSE2,SS,HTT,TM,PBE,NXE,LONG,SSE3,DTES64,MWAIT,DS-CPL,VMX,EST,TM2,SSSE3,CX16,xTPR,PDCM,MOVBE,LAHF,PERF
real mem  = 1073131520 (1023MB)
avail mem = 1044611072 (996MB)
mainbus0 at root
bios0 at mainbus0: AT/286+ BIOS, date 20/21/15, BIOS32 rev. 0 @ 0xfac40
mpbios0 at bios0: Intel MP Specification 1.4
cpu0 at mainbus0: apid 0 (boot processor)
cpu0: apic clock running at 100MHz
cpu at mainbus0: not configured
mpbios0: bus 0 is type PCI
mpbios0: bus 64 is type ISA
ioapic0 at mainbus0: apid 0 pa 0xfec00000, version 20, 24 pins
pcibios0 at bios0: rev 2.0 @ 0xf0000/0x10000
pcibios0: PCI IRQ Routing Table rev 1.0 @ 0xf3880/96 (4 entries)
pcibios0: no compatible PCI ICU found: ICU vendor 0x8086 product 0x8186
pcibios0: Warning, unable to fix up PCI interrupt routing
pcibios0: PCI bus #13 is the last bus
bios0: ROM list: 0xc8000/0x2400 0xca800/0x4c00 0xcf800/0xee00
cpu0: unknown Enhanced SpeedStep CPU, msr 0x06090a0a06000a0d
cpu0: using only highest, current and lowest power states
cpu0: Enhanced SpeedStep 1001 MHz: speeds: 1000, 1000, 600 MHz
pci0 at mainbus0 bus 0: configuration mode 1 (bios)
pchb0 at pci0 dev 0 function 0 "Intel E600 Host" rev 0x05
pchb1 at pci0 dev 1 function 0 "Intel E600 Config" rev 0x00
ppb0 at pci0 dev 23 function 0 "Intel E600 PCIE" rev 0x00
pci1 at ppb0 bus 1
ppb1 at pci1 dev 0 function 0 "Intel EG20T PCIE" rev 0x01
pci2 at ppb1 bus 2
"Intel EG20T Packet Hub" rev 0x01 at pci2 dev 0 function 0 not configured
"Intel EG20T Ethernet" rev 0x02 at pci2 dev 0 function 1 not configured
"Intel EG20T GPIO" rev 0x01 at pci2 dev 0 function 2 not configured
ohci0 at pci2 dev 2 function 0 "Intel EG20T USB" rev 0x02: apic 0 int
19, version 1.0
ohci1 at pci2 dev 2 function 1 "Intel EG20T USB" rev 0x02: apic 0 int
19, version 1.0
ohci2 at pci2 dev 2 function 2 "Intel EG20T USB" rev 0x02: apic 0 int
19, version 1.0
ehci0 at pci2 dev 2 function 3 "Intel EG20T USB" rev 0x02: apic 0 int 19
usb0 at ehci0: USB revision 2.0
uhub0 at usb0 "Intel EHCI root hub" rev 2.00/1.00 addr 1
"Intel EG20T USB Client" rev 0x02 at pci2 dev 2 function 4 not configured
sdhc0 at pci2 dev 4 function 0 "Intel EG20T SDIO" rev 0x01: apic 0 int 18
sdmmc0 at sdhc0
sdhc1 at pci2 dev 4 function 1 "Intel EG20T SDIO" rev 0x01: apic 0 int 18
sdmmc1 at sdhc1
ahci0 at pci2 dev 6 function 0 "Intel EG20T AHCI" rev 0x02: msi, AHCI 1.1
scsibus0 at ahci0: 32 targets
sd0 at scsibus0 targ 1 lun 0: <ATA, INTEL SSDMAEXC02, 9CV1> SCSI3
0/direct fixed naa.5001517803d66c24
sd0: 19087MB, 512 bytes/sector, 39091248 sectors, thin
ohci3 at pci2 dev 8 function 0 "Intel EG20T USB" rev 0x02: apic 0 int
16, version 1.0
ohci4 at pci2 dev 8 function 1 "Intel EG20T USB" rev 0x02: apic 0 int
16, version 1.0
ohci5 at pci2 dev 8 function 2 "Intel EG20T USB" rev 0x02: apic 0 int
16, version 1.0
ehci1 at pci2 dev 8 function 3 "Intel EG20T USB" rev 0x02: apic 0 int 16
usb1 at ehci1: USB revision 2.0
uhub1 at usb1 "Intel EHCI root hub" rev 2.00/1.00 addr 1
"Intel EG20T DMA" rev 0x00 at pci2 dev 10 function 0 not configured
puc0 at pci2 dev 10 function 1 "Intel EG20T Serial" rev 0x01: ports: 1 com
com3 at puc0 port 0 apic 0 int 19: ti16750, 64 byte fifo
puc1 at pci2 dev 10 function 2 "Intel EG20T Serial" rev 0x00: ports: 1 com
com4 at puc1 port 0 apic 0 int 19: ti16750, 64 byte fifo
puc2 at pci2 dev 10 function 3 "Intel EG20T Serial" rev 0x00: ports: 1 com
com5 at puc2 port 0 apic 0 int 19: ti16750, 64 byte fifo
puc3 at pci2 dev 10 function 4 "Intel EG20T Serial" rev 0x00: ports: 1 com
com6 at puc3 port 0 apic 0 int 19: ti16750, 64 byte fifo
"Intel EG20T DMA" rev 0x00 at pci2 dev 12 function 0 not configured
"Intel EG20T SPI" rev 0x00 at pci2 dev 12 function 1 not configured
"Intel EG20T I2C" rev 0x00 at pci2 dev 12 function 2 not configured
"Intel EG20T CAN" rev 0x00 at pci2 dev 12 function 3 not configured
"Intel EG20T 1588" rev 0x01 at pci2 dev 12 function 4 not configured
usb2 at ohci0: USB revision 1.0
uhub2 at usb2 "Intel OHCI root hub" rev 1.00/1.00 addr 1
usb3 at ohci1: USB revision 1.0
uhub3 at usb3 "Intel OHCI root hub" rev 1.00/1.00 addr 1
usb4 at ohci2: USB revision 1.0
uhub4 at usb4 "Intel OHCI root hub" rev 1.00/1.00 addr 1
usb5 at ohci3: USB revision 1.0
uhub5 at usb5 "Intel OHCI root hub" rev 1.00/1.00 addr 1
usb6 at ohci4: USB revision 1.0
uhub6 at usb6 "Intel OHCI root hub" rev 1.00/1.00 addr 1
usb7 at ohci5: USB revision 1.0
uhub7 at usb7 "Intel OHCI root hub" rev 1.00/1.00 addr 1
ppb2 at pci0 dev 24 function 0 "Intel E600 PCIE" rev 0x00
pci3 at ppb2 bus 3
ppb3 at pci3 dev 0 function 0 "IDT 89HPES4T4" rev 0x0e
pci4 at ppb3 bus 4
ppb4 at pci4 dev 2 function 0 "IDT 89HPES4T4" rev 0x0e
pci5 at ppb4 bus 5
em0 at pci5 dev 0 function 0 "Intel PRO/1000 MT (82574L)" rev 0x00: msi,
address 00:00:24:d0:24:0c
ppb5 at pci4 dev 3 function 0 "IDT 89HPES4T4" rev 0x0e
pci6 at ppb5 bus 6
em1 at pci6 dev 0 function 0 "Intel PRO/1000 MT (82574L)" rev 0x00: msi,
address 00:00:24:d0:24:0d
ppb6 at pci4 dev 4 function 0 "IDT 89HPES4T4" rev 0x0e
pci7 at ppb6 bus 7
ppb7 at pci0 dev 25 function 0 "Intel E600 PCIE" rev 0x00
pci8 at ppb7 bus 8
ppb8 at pci8 dev 0 function 0 "IDT 89HPES4T4" rev 0x0e
pci9 at ppb8 bus 9
ppb9 at pci9 dev 2 function 0 "IDT 89HPES4T4" rev 0x0e
pci10 at ppb9 bus 10
em2 at pci10 dev 0 function 0 "Intel PRO/1000 MT (82574L)" rev 0x00:
msi, address 00:00:24:d0:24:0e
ppb10 at pci9 dev 3 function 0 "IDT 89HPES4T4" rev 0x0e
pci11 at ppb10 bus 11
em3 at pci11 dev 0 function 0 "Intel PRO/1000 MT (82574L)" rev 0x00:
msi, address 00:00:24:d0:24:0f
ppb11 at pci9 dev 4 function 0 "IDT 89HPES4T4" rev 0x0e
pci12 at ppb11 bus 12
ppb12 at pci0 dev 26 function 0 "Intel E600 PCIE" rev 0x00
pci13 at ppb12 bus 13
tcpcib0 at pci0 dev 31 function 0 "Intel E600 LPC" rev 0x00: 14318179 Hz
timer, watchdog
isa0 at tcpcib0
isadma0 at isa0
com0 at isa0 port 0x3f8/8 irq 4: ti16750, 64 byte fifo
com0: console
pcppi0 at isa0 port 0x61
spkr0 at pcppi0
npx0 at isa0 port 0xf0/16: reported by CPUID; using exception 16
mtrr: Pentium Pro MTRR support
vscsi0 at root
scsibus1 at vscsi0: 256 targets
softraid0 at root
scsibus2 at softraid0: 256 targets
root on sd0a (40a71e1c20bdb67b.a) swap on sd0b dump on sd0b

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Re: Is Soekris OpenBSD friendly?

James Hartley
In reply to this post by SmithS
Learning to search the archives is a very useful skill:

http://marc.info/?l=openbsd-misc&w=2&r=1&s=soekris&q=b


On Fri, Nov 15, 2013 at 6:03 PM, SmithS <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Greetings misc@.  After coming across a link[1] to make an OpenBSD
> router using a "Soekris" device, I think I will make one.  Does anyone
> else have this hardware and can verify all the components work?
> I think Intel NICs are good, but everything else?  I have never heard
> of this brand before so I want to be safe before buying.  The model
> number[2] is "6501-30"
>
> [1] http://www.bsdnow.tv/tutorials/openbsd-router
> [2] https://soekris.com/products/net6501/net6501-30-board-case.html
>
> greetz,
> SmithS

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Re: Is Soekris OpenBSD friendly?

Johan Beisser
In reply to this post by jordon-7
I'm not sure what you mean by "too slow to route."

I've a net4501 with 64mb of RAM that's handling all of my IP traffic
at home. Biggest problem is swapping taking out available interrupts.

Modern networks are actually just too fast for the hardware these
days. It works fine for home stuff.

On Fri, Nov 15, 2013 at 5:39 PM, jordon <[hidden email]> wrote:

> I have an old net4511 running 5.4.  It’s too old/slow to route but it’s too fun to not have running because how many other OS’es can run on a 486 100MHz with 32MB RAM?
>
>
>
>
> On Nov 15, 2013, at 6:03 PM, SmithS <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>> Greetings misc@.  After coming across a link[1] to make an OpenBSD
>> router using a "Soekris" device, I think I will make one.  Does anyone
>> else have this hardware and can verify all the components work?
>> I think Intel NICs are good, but everything else?  I have never heard
>> of this brand before so I want to be safe before buying.  The model
>> number[2] is "6501-30"
>>
>> [1] http://www.bsdnow.tv/tutorials/openbsd-router
>> [2] https://soekris.com/products/net6501/net6501-30-board-case.html
>>
>> greetz,
>> SmithS

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Re: Is Soekris OpenBSD friendly?

jordon-7
A few years back I put m0n0wall (FreeBSD-based) on it, hooked it up to 2 machines (1 WAN, 1 LAN) and pushed a file through it.  Its max bandwidth was well under my Internet connection speed.

It was replaced with a net5501.




On Nov 15, 2013, at 10:55 PM, Johan Beisser <[hidden email]> wrote:

> I'm not sure what you mean by "too slow to route."
>
> I've a net4501 with 64mb of RAM that's handling all of my IP traffic
> at home. Biggest problem is swapping taking out available interrupts.
>
> Modern networks are actually just too fast for the hardware these
> days. It works fine for home stuff.
>
> On Fri, Nov 15, 2013 at 5:39 PM, jordon <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> I have an old net4511 running 5.4.  It’s too old/slow to route but it’s too fun to not have running because how many other OS’es can run on a 486 100MHz with 32MB RAM?
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> On Nov 15, 2013, at 6:03 PM, SmithS <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>
>>> Greetings misc@.  After coming across a link[1] to make an OpenBSD
>>> router using a "Soekris" device, I think I will make one.  Does anyone
>>> else have this hardware and can verify all the components work?
>>> I think Intel NICs are good, but everything else?  I have never heard
>>> of this brand before so I want to be safe before buying.  The model
>>> number[2] is "6501-30"
>>>
>>> [1] http://www.bsdnow.tv/tutorials/openbsd-router
>>> [2] https://soekris.com/products/net6501/net6501-30-board-case.html
>>>
>>> greetz,
>>> SmithS

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Re: Is Soekris OpenBSD friendly?

Shawn K. Quinn-2
In reply to this post by Johan Beisser
On Fri, Nov 15, 2013, at 10:55 PM, Johan Beisser wrote:
> I'm not sure what you mean by "too slow to route."
>
> I've a net4501 with 64mb of RAM that's handling all of my IP traffic
> at home. Biggest problem is swapping taking out available interrupts.

Back in the day I used full-size PCs with processor and memory specs
similar to a net4501 with no issues. Some of them even had enough disk
space left over to run Squid.

--
  Shawn K. Quinn
  [hidden email]

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Re: Is Soekris OpenBSD friendly?

Johan Beisser
In reply to this post by jordon-7
On Fri, Nov 15, 2013 at 9:00 PM, jordon <[hidden email]> wrote:
> A few years back I put m0n0wall (FreeBSD-based) on it, hooked it up to 2 machines (1 WAN, 1 LAN) and pushed a file through it.  Its max bandwidth was well under my Internet connection speed.
>
> It was replaced with a net5501.
>

It's not below mine. I can saturate it, but my inbound is still well
below what the hardware can handle. I'll upgrade eventually.

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Re: Is Soekris OpenBSD friendly?

Constantine A. Murenin
In reply to this post by SmithS
On 15 November 2013 16:03, SmithS <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Greetings misc@.  After coming across a link[1] to make an OpenBSD
> router using a "Soekris" device, I think I will make one.  Does anyone
> else have this hardware and can verify all the components work?
> I think Intel NICs are good, but everything else?  I have never heard
> of this brand before so I want to be safe before buying.  The model
> number[2] is "6501-30"
>
> [1] http://www.bsdnow.tv/tutorials/openbsd-router
> [2] https://soekris.com/products/net6501/net6501-30-board-case.html
>
> greetz,
> SmithS

Soekris has been used with OpenBSD for a very long time throughout
many releases, so, if you like what you see, that's exactly what
you're going to get.  Their brand is actually very well known.

However, their hardware is not particularly competitive in the price
department, and, incidentally, is also quite known for being an
excellent tool to fine-tune overall OpenBSD performance under very
stressful network scenarios, which don't take much effort to generate
(especially on their pre-GigE hardware, but a 600MHz Atom is probably
not that much different).

If you only need two NICs, there are many alternatives that are priced
considerably lower than Soekris, and provide a better value; some are
still fanless and already have two GigE NICs on board.

The "net6501-30-board-case" above, w/ 600 MHz Intel Atom and soldered
0.5GB of DDR2 RAM, is 310 USD, plus "psu-12v-3-0a-world" is 20 USD
extra, for a total of 330 USD + tax/shipping/handling.  Plus you'll
need some storage device.

A quick search today reveals Shuttle DS47 -- fanless, dual GigE, two
COM ports, lots of USB 3.0, accepts up to 16GB of DDR3, probably
supported by the latest OpenBSD release, especially if you only need
it for a router (might have to use 5.4-current due to
http://www.openbsd.org/cgi-bin/cvsweb/src/sys/dev/ic/re.c#rev1.145).
220 USD, with a choice of multiple retailers to buy from, plus a
little extra for a lot more DDR3 than the soldered 0.5GB of the
Soekris.

    http://global.shuttle.com/main/productsDetail?productId=1718
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16856101145
    http://www.amazon.com/SHUTTLE-DS47-Celeron-1-1GHz-Barebone/dp/B00DK06L6O?keywords=%222x+RJ45%22+barebone

Foxconn also makes nice barebones -- they're even cheaper than Shuttle.

However, if you don't require solid GigE performance, and are looking
for just 100Mbps routing throughput for a home-router project, my
advice is to buy a netbook -- they go for 200 to 250 USD nowadays,
plus an external USB Gigabit Ethernet adapter is 10 to 20 USD.  Most
cheap USB Ethernet adapters are supported nowadays, especially on
OpenBSD.

With a netbook-based OpenBSD router, you'll have a complementary UPS,
plus a diagnostic display w/ keyboard (alas with no serial), plus a
fast SSD or HDD that's also included.  And the price is the same as,
or even lower than, any of the alternatives that would not have any
such features.

You really can't beat the value by going with a netbook, unless you do
require 4x 1Gbps, x2, which you aren't going to get with a 600MHz
Atom-based Soekris, either.

C.

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Re: Is Soekris OpenBSD friendly?

Peter van Oord v/d Vlies
In reply to this post by SmithS
for sure it’s a good device with openbsd, only price is sometimes an issue.
I have been using it for more then 8 years now and works great, never had an hardware failure.
Even the oldest devices are still up and running but are getting to slow..

On 16 Nov 2013, at 01:03, SmithS <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Greetings misc@.  After coming across a link[1] to make an OpenBSD
> router using a "Soekris" device, I think I will make one.  Does anyone
> else have this hardware and can verify all the components work?
> I think Intel NICs are good, but everything else?  I have never heard
> of this brand before so I want to be safe before buying.  The model
> number[2] is "6501-30"
>
> [1] http://www.bsdnow.tv/tutorials/openbsd-router
> [2] https://soekris.com/products/net6501/net6501-30-board-case.html
>
> greetz,
> SmithS

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Re: Is Soekris OpenBSD friendly?

ropers
In reply to this post by Constantine A. Murenin
On 16 November 2013 10:05, Constantine A. Murenin <[hidden email]> wrote:

>
> ...if you don't require solid GigE performance, and are looking
> for just 100Mbps routing throughput for a home-router project, my
> advice is to buy a netbook -- they go for 200 to 250 USD nowadays,
> plus an external USB Gigabit Ethernet adapter is 10 to 20 USD.  Most
> cheap USB Ethernet adapters are supported nowadays, especially on
> OpenBSD.
>
> With a netbook-based OpenBSD router, you'll have a complementary UPS,
> plus a diagnostic display w/ keyboard (alas with no serial), plus a
> fast SSD or HDD that's also included.  And the price is the same as,
> or even lower than, any of the alternatives that would not have any
> such features.
>
> You really can't beat the value by going with a netbook, unless you do
> require 4x 1Gbps, x2, which you aren't going to get with a 600MHz
> Atom-based Soekris, either.

Do all netbooks nowadays allow clamshell operation though (i.e.
running the thing at full throttle with the lid closed)?

Because a long time ago, I used to own an Apple laptop (not a netbook,
admittedly) that did NOT allow clamshell operation; it would
unconditionally go to sleep when you closed the lid – and even though
there were some published hacks to overrule Apple's choice and make it
run with the lid closed and only the display off, this was deemed
risky, because it wasn't clear if in that case heat-buildup under the
display would become a (screen-melting) issue. I'm not claiming that
that's a risk you'll run with netbooks these days; I genuinely don't
know and I'm genuinely asking.

--ropers

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Re: Is Soekris OpenBSD friendly?

Chris Cappuccio
In reply to this post by Constantine A. Murenin
Constantine A. Murenin [[hidden email]] wrote:
>
> However, if you don't require solid GigE performance, and are looking
> for just 100Mbps routing throughput for a home-router project, my
> advice is to buy a netbook -- they go for 200 to 250 USD nowadays,
> plus an external USB Gigabit Ethernet adapter is 10 to 20 USD.  Most
> cheap USB Ethernet adapters are supported nowadays, especially on
> OpenBSD.
>

A netbook? USB nic? No, that's junk. Sounds like an unreliable recipe for
disaster. Why not just get a Soekris 5501 or a similar PC Engines ALIX,
they can do 100Mbps with the improved vr ethernet driver these days. The PC
Engines is $100 USD and has 3 ethernet ports. PC Engines is coming out
with a new model pcengines.ch/apu.htm that will cost roughly $130-150USD if
you can wait another 3 or 4 months.

If you don't mind netbooting, you can use a Ubiquiti EdgeRouter Lite for $99.
The USB isn't supported yet under OpenBSD. There are probably some viable
armv7 options these days too that might be less than $100.

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Re: Is Soekris OpenBSD friendly?

Ted Unangst-6
In reply to this post by SmithS
On Sat, Nov 16, 2013 at 08:27, Chris Cappuccio wrote:

> If you don't mind netbooting, you can use a Ubiquiti EdgeRouter Lite for $99.

that's a pretty serious chicken and egg for me. my router is the
machine that everything else netboots from...

Anyway, another idea is this thing from newegg. I have one. It's
not quite so industrial hardened as soekris, but also cheaper and
more real PC like. If you happen to have all the needed barebones
parts (who doesn't? :)), it's pretty cheap.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16856205007

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Re: Is Soekris OpenBSD friendly?

Juan Francisco Cantero Hurtado
In reply to this post by Chris Cappuccio
On Sat, Nov 16, 2013 at 08:27:28AM -0800, Chris Cappuccio wrote:

> Constantine A. Murenin [[hidden email]] wrote:
> >
> > However, if you don't require solid GigE performance, and are looking
> > for just 100Mbps routing throughput for a home-router project, my
> > advice is to buy a netbook -- they go for 200 to 250 USD nowadays,
> > plus an external USB Gigabit Ethernet adapter is 10 to 20 USD.  Most
> > cheap USB Ethernet adapters are supported nowadays, especially on
> > OpenBSD.
> >
>
> A netbook? USB nic? No, that's junk. Sounds like an unreliable recipe for
> disaster. Why not just get a Soekris 5501 or a similar PC Engines ALIX,
> they can do 100Mbps with the improved vr ethernet driver these days. The PC
> Engines is $100 USD and has 3 ethernet ports. PC Engines is coming out
> with a new model pcengines.ch/apu.htm that will cost roughly $130-150USD if
> you can wait another 3 or 4 months.
>
> If you don't mind netbooting, you can use a Ubiquiti EdgeRouter Lite for $99.
> The USB isn't supported yet under OpenBSD. There are probably some viable
> armv7 options these days too that might be less than $100.

I don't recommend armv7 for production. Despite of the big efforts of
some devs, the platform needs a lot of work and testing.

--
Juan Francisco Cantero Hurtado http://juanfra.info

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Re: Is Soekris OpenBSD friendly?

Juan Francisco Cantero Hurtado
In reply to this post by ropers
On Sat, Nov 16, 2013 at 01:30:28PM +0100, ropers wrote:

> On 16 November 2013 10:05, Constantine A. Murenin <[hidden email]> wrote:
> >
> > ...if you don't require solid GigE performance, and are looking
> > for just 100Mbps routing throughput for a home-router project, my
> > advice is to buy a netbook -- they go for 200 to 250 USD nowadays,
> > plus an external USB Gigabit Ethernet adapter is 10 to 20 USD.  Most
> > cheap USB Ethernet adapters are supported nowadays, especially on
> > OpenBSD.
> >
> > With a netbook-based OpenBSD router, you'll have a complementary UPS,
> > plus a diagnostic display w/ keyboard (alas with no serial), plus a
> > fast SSD or HDD that's also included.  And the price is the same as,
> > or even lower than, any of the alternatives that would not have any
> > such features.
> >
> > You really can't beat the value by going with a netbook, unless you do
> > require 4x 1Gbps, x2, which you aren't going to get with a 600MHz
> > Atom-based Soekris, either.
>
> Do all netbooks nowadays allow clamshell operation though (i.e.
> running the thing at full throttle with the lid closed)?

On OpenBSD, yes.

>
> Because a long time ago, I used to own an Apple laptop (not a netbook,
> admittedly) that did NOT allow clamshell operation; it would
> unconditionally go to sleep when you closed the lid – and even though
> there were some published hacks to overrule Apple's choice and make it
> run with the lid closed and only the display off, this was deemed
> risky, because it wasn't clear if in that case heat-buildup under the
> display would become a (screen-melting) issue. I'm not claiming that
> that's a risk you'll run with netbooks these days; I genuinely don't
> know and I'm genuinely asking.
>
> --ropers
>

--
Juan Francisco Cantero Hurtado http://juanfra.info

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Re: Is Soekris OpenBSD friendly?

Darren Tucker
In reply to this post by Chris Cappuccio
On Sat, Nov 16, 2013 at 11:27 AM, Chris Cappuccio <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Why not just get a Soekris 5501 or a similar PC Engines ALIX,

+1 for the ALIX (I've got two alix2d3 and have been very happy with them)

> they can do 100Mbps with the improved vr ethernet driver these days.

Have you been able to get more than 85Mbit/s out of a single interface
on an ALIX?  85 was the best I could get when playing the tx interrupt
mitigation stuff[1] but it had plenty of spare CPU.  My guess was it
was maxing out the NIC hardware, and that turning off checksum
offloading would make it go faster at the cost of more CPU usage
although I never tested that.

[1] http://undeadly.org/cgi?action=article&sid=20130201054156

--
Darren Tucker (dtucker at zip.com.au)
GPG key 8FF4FA69 / D9A3 86E9 7EEE AF4B B2D4  37C9 C982 80C7 8FF4 FA69
    Good judgement comes with experience. Unfortunately, the experience
usually comes from bad judgement.

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Re: Is Soekris OpenBSD friendly?

Chris Cappuccio
Darren Tucker [[hidden email]] wrote:

> On Sat, Nov 16, 2013 at 11:27 AM, Chris Cappuccio <[hidden email]> wrote:
> > Why not just get a Soekris 5501 or a similar PC Engines ALIX,
>
> +1 for the ALIX (I've got two alix2d3 and have been very happy with them)
>
> > they can do 100Mbps with the improved vr ethernet driver these days.
>
> Have you been able to get more than 85Mbit/s out of a single interface
> on an ALIX?  85 was the best I could get when playing the tx interrupt
> mitigation stuff[1] but it had plenty of spare CPU.  My guess was it
> was maxing out the NIC hardware, and that turning off checksum
> offloading would make it go faster at the cost of more CPU usage
> although I never tested that.
>
> [1] http://undeadly.org/cgi?action=article&sid=20130201054156
>

Your're right, I didn't reach a full 100Mbps, although I recall
getting 90+ on file transfers to local MFS, with cksum enabled.
I won't swear to that ;)