Installing a snapshot to a USB key using bsd.rd

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Installing a snapshot to a USB key using bsd.rd

Rodney Polkinghorne
Hi

This is my first post here, I appreciate how much work you all do, please
be gentle. :-)

Could someone please tell me how to install the latest snapshot, or point
me at some instructions that work?  I tried the following:

1. Download bsd.rd and SHA256.sig from
http://mirror.aarnet.edu.au/pub/OpenBSD/snapshots/

2. Fail to verify the 6.3 signatures, because I'm running 6.1.  (It would
be nice if the signify man page had instructions to download and verify
openbsd-<future version>-base.pub.)

3. Reboot, with boot> boot sd0a:/root/bsd.rd

4. Choose to install to sd1 (a USB key), default options, location of sets
is http, HTTP server is mirror.aarnet.edu.au.

5. The default server directory is pub/OpenBSD/6.3/i386, override that with
snapshots instead of 6.3

6. Leave all sets selected, and say done

At this point, the installer reported that SHA256.sig had downloaded and
verified, and that bsd downloaded but failed its checksum test.

Possibly the answer is to ignore the checksums, but I want to ask first.

Rodney Polkinghorne
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Re: Installing a snapshot to a USB key using bsd.rd

Oliver Marugg
On 17 Mar 2018, at 4:59, Rodney Polkinghorne wrote:

> Hi
>
> This is my first post here, I appreciate how much work you all do,
> please
> be gentle. :-)
>
> Could someone please tell me how to install the latest snapshot, or
> point
> me at some instructions that work?  I tried the following:
>
> 1. Download bsd.rd and SHA256.sig from
> http://mirror.aarnet.edu.au/pub/OpenBSD/snapshots/
>
> 2. Fail to verify the 6.3 signatures, because I'm running 6.1.  (It
> would
> be nice if the signify man page had instructions to download and
> verify
> openbsd-<future version>-base.pub.)
>
> 3. Reboot, with boot> boot sd0a:/root/bsd.rd
>
> 4. Choose to install to sd1 (a USB key), default options, location of
> sets
> is http, HTTP server is mirror.aarnet.edu.au.
>
> 5. The default server directory is pub/OpenBSD/6.3/i386, override that
> with
> snapshots instead of 6.3
>
> 6. Leave all sets selected, and say done
>
> At this point, the installer reported that SHA256.sig had downloaded
> and
> verified, and that bsd downloaded but failed its checksum test.
>
> Possibly the answer is to ignore the checksums, but I want to ask
> first.
>
> Rodney Polkinghorne


AFAIK You can only upgrade from one major release to another. Check
upgrade guide https://www.openbsd.org/faq/upgrade62.html
At the moment snapshots are already 6.3-beta, which will be the release
following 6.2 according to upgrade guide, and the snapshots are/will be
prepared for upcoming 6.3 (installurl and path, path to packages etc.).
I guess its better the whole system will be correctly updated to
6.2-release first. Then switch from a freshly updated
6.2-release->6.2-current (eq 6.3-beta).

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Re: Installing a snapshot to a USB key using bsd.rd

Chris Bennett-4
In reply to this post by Rodney Polkinghorne
On Sat, Mar 17, 2018 at 03:59:01AM +0000, Rodney Polkinghorne wrote:

> Hi
>
> This is my first post here, I appreciate how much work you all do, please
> be gentle. :-)
>
> Could someone please tell me how to install the latest snapshot, or point
> me at some instructions that work?  I tried the following:
>
> 1. Download bsd.rd and SHA256.sig from
> http://mirror.aarnet.edu.au/pub/OpenBSD/snapshots/
>
> 2. Fail to verify the 6.3 signatures, because I'm running 6.1.  (It would
> be nice if the signify man page had instructions to download and verify
> openbsd-<future version>-base.pub.)
>
> 3. Reboot, with boot> boot sd0a:/root/bsd.rd
>
> 4. Choose to install to sd1 (a USB key), default options, location of sets
> is http, HTTP server is mirror.aarnet.edu.au.
>
> 5. The default server directory is pub/OpenBSD/6.3/i386, override that with
> snapshots instead of 6.3
>
> 6. Leave all sets selected, and say done
>
> At this point, the installer reported that SHA256.sig had downloaded and
> verified, and that bsd downloaded but failed its checksum test.
>
> Possibly the answer is to ignore the checksums, but I want to ask first.
>
> Rodney Polkinghorne

You need to be sure to use the bsd.rd from the snapshot!
You say install, which is very different from upgrade.
Even with a fresh install, if you want to keep something like the
existing /home directory, just don't include it in the new disklabel.
But be sure to be able to correctly include the correct mount
directories for the existing partitions which will come up if you pick a
custom disklabel. For example typing 'n a' will let you enter / as the
partition mount point. I wouldn't try upgrading if you want a snapshot
since so much changes. Note that you can put the files on the directory
that you don't want to get newfs to run on, but be sure NOT to add it in
the disklabel until you are done with the install.
Also, using ! will get you into the shell if you get confused.

I recommend backing up the partition you want to keep, /etc and the
list of packages you will need to re-install. Sometimes packages you
were using have been dropped, so be prepared to deal with that.

If you have another USB, install the OS and play around with it until
you get a good idea of what's going on. It's kind of cool once you see
all the tricks you can do. Just be sure to play around after you have
OpenBSD installed so that you will find that the original disklabel
shows up during an install under the custom option, just without the
mount points showing up.

Also, watch where the mount points start and end. You can growfs a
partition if and only if you are using the partition that follows it.
Which means that you should add partitions in the order that let's you
sacrifice the next one if you find something like /usr/local too small.
/usr/local followed by /var would be a bad idea since messing with /var
is possible but a real pain to do.

Have some fun. umount a partition that isn't essential and run fsck, not
fsck -fp on it and see what gets done.

Enjoy!
Chris Bennett


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Re: Installing a snapshot to a USB key using bsd.rd

Rodney Polkinghorne
Thanks for the replies.  I suspect this is the answer I needed: don't
try to install a 6.2 snapshot just before version 6.3 is released,
instead wait for the release and install that.

> You need to be sure to use the bsd.rd from the snapshot!

I'm pretty sure that's what I booted.  Does any other bsd.rd have a
default path of pub/OpenBSD/6.3/i386?

> You say install, which is very different from upgrade.

I'm running 6.1 on my laptop hard disk, and I wanted to install a
recent snapshot to a USB key.  The back story involves an upgrade to
6.2 stable, a kernel failure whenever I started X Windows, and a
desire to reproduce the fault while preserving a bootable system on
the hard disk.

I'll wait for the 6.3 release, and see if X still crashes the kernel.

Thanks again

Rodney

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Re: Installing a snapshot to a USB key using bsd.rd

Stuart Henderson
In reply to this post by Rodney Polkinghorne
On 2018-03-17, Rodney Polkinghorne <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Hi
>
> This is my first post here, I appreciate how much work you all do, please
> be gentle. :-)
>
> Could someone please tell me how to install the latest snapshot, or point
> me at some instructions that work?  I tried the following:
>
> 1. Download bsd.rd and SHA256.sig from
> http://mirror.aarnet.edu.au/pub/OpenBSD/snapshots/
>
> 2. Fail to verify the 6.3 signatures, because I'm running 6.1.  (It would
> be nice if the signify man page had instructions to download and verify
> openbsd-<future version>-base.pub.)

You can fetch this from src/etc/signify via cvsweb, or untar ./etc/signify
fron 6.2's base62.tgz.

> 3. Reboot, with boot> boot sd0a:/root/bsd.rd
>
> 4. Choose to install to sd1 (a USB key), default options, location of sets
> is http, HTTP server is mirror.aarnet.edu.au.
>
> 5. The default server directory is pub/OpenBSD/6.3/i386, override that with
> snapshots instead of 6.3
>
> 6. Leave all sets selected, and say done
>
> At this point, the installer reported that SHA256.sig had downloaded and
> verified, and that bsd downloaded but failed its checksum test.
>
> Possibly the answer is to ignore the checksums, but I want to ask first.

Perhaps you caught the mirror mid-update, does it still happen now?

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Re: Installing a snapshot to a USB key using bsd.rd

Stuart Henderson
In reply to this post by Rodney Polkinghorne
On 2018-03-18, Rodney Polkinghorne <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Thanks for the replies.  I suspect this is the answer I needed: don't
> try to install a 6.2 snapshot just before version 6.3 is released,
> instead wait for the release and install that.

The only adaptations regarding it approaching release you need should be
setting the install path, and using -Dsnap when installing packages.

>> You need to be sure to use the bsd.rd from the snapshot!
>
> I'm pretty sure that's what I booted.  Does any other bsd.rd have a
> default path of pub/OpenBSD/6.3/i386?
>
>> You say install, which is very different from upgrade.
>
> I'm running 6.1 on my laptop hard disk, and I wanted to install a
> recent snapshot to a USB key.  The back story involves an upgrade to
> 6.2 stable, a kernel failure whenever I started X Windows, and a
> desire to reproduce the fault while preserving a bootable system on
> the hard disk.
>
> I'll wait for the 6.3 release, and see if X still crashes the kernel.

Better to test sooner, if it still fails, if you can get a good report
written up there's still some chance of a fix before release.

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Re: Installing a snapshot to a USB key using bsd.rd

Rodney Polkinghorne
Thanks Stuart

> Better to test sooner, if it still fails, if you can get a good report
> written up there's still some chance of a fix before release.

The machine is a cheap Dell laptop that's about 10 years old.  It's
possible that an innocent change in the software triggered a latent
hardware fault.

> Perhaps you caught the mirror mid-update, does it still happen now?

I did think of that.  Minutes after the install failed, I confirmed
that the mtimes on the Aarnet mirror were 10 hours old.  I might have
been mislead by timezones, and I'll try again tonight.

Rodney

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Re: Installing a snapshot to a USB key using bsd.rd

Rodney Polkinghorne
It turns out that the snapshot on Aarnet failed to match its checksum
for a blindingly obvious reason.  It was corrupt.

I installed a snapshot from another mirror, started X, and crashed the
kernel.  I'll try to post the details to bugs@ in a day or two, but
some hand holding would be appreciated.

Thanks everyone

Rodney