Improvements and thoughts on small projects for advocacy

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Re: Improvements and thoughts on small projects for advocacy

jeanfrancois
Hi,

This means do things and make advocacy I'd guess,
to be honest BSD's about 0,1% usage though a real
backbone at some critical points of the network, this
means there's really no one do to the job, it's used
and programmed at the same time, for real usage.

So far as example it's the nat rooter in virtual
environment for some people, their local rooter,
server, firewall, so almost anything we can do is
work out solution and share with others.


Regards


Jean-François


Le 15/05/2020 à 03:06, Theo de Raadt a écrit :

> You've done nothing except believe that words are action.
>
> Aisha Tammy <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>> On 5/14/20 8:52 PM, Theo de Raadt wrote:
>>> Aisha Tammy <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>>
>>>> On 5/14/20 7:24 PM, Theo de Raadt wrote:
>>>>> Kyle Willett <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>> I think OpenBSD advocacy could do more too.  I read on an open source
>>>>>> news site that Lenovo is going to start offering a Fedora Linux option
>>>>>> on their Thinkpad lineup and already certifies some for Red Hat
>>>>>> Enterprise Linux.  I think it would be great if we could get some
>>>>> Who is "we"?
>>>>>                            
>>>>>> hardware manufacturer to certify OpenBSD on a device and offer it
>>>>>> pre-installed as an OS choice.  I think that would be a good thing for
>>>>>> the project.  Maybe an AMD64 x86_64 laptop is too much at first and
>>>>>> maybe we should start with one of the arm or mips laptops supported
>>>>> Who is "we"?
>>>>>
>>>>>> well by OpenBSD.  I don't know just a dream I have.
>>>>> Why go around telling people your dreams?  Why not do all this yourself?
>>>>> You don't need a mailing list for it.  Is it your dream that others in the
>>>>> group "we" will do what you dream?
>>>>>
>>>>> What you are doing here is advocating that other people do that which
>>>>> you don't and won't do yourself.  To be honest, it comes off small minded.
>>>>>
>>>> There are many possible assumptions of what they could have meant, I don't
>>>> think there is a need to be overly harsh to their attitude. For all I know
>>>> they might be an enthusiastic college student who wants to help.
>>> I suspect you are an enthusiastic person who wants to send a mail to us,
>>> telling us what to do.
>>>
>> Sorry if it seemed like that.
>> I am not telling anyone what to do. I am asking for suggestions on what I could
>> do more.
>>
>>> But that which you dream of?  You won't left a leg to do any of it.
>>>
>>>> Voicing your ideas and finding like minded people is a good motivator for
>>>> doing a project.
>>> No, doing work is what makes projects.
>>>
>>> You are just typing words
>>>  
>>>> @Kyle, I do appreciate your enthusiasm.
>>>> That said, I do agree that going straight to hardware is far from what is
>>>> possible as a short term goal.
>>>>
>>>> I think it is better by starting to do small things,
>>> I agree it is better to DO THINGS.
>>>
>>> But you are writing words.
>> I do try to help in any small way that I can in ports@, though
>> I am not too good at it yet.
>>
>>>> I've already asked the newsletters to hopefully include the recent news about
>>>> wireguard patches (even though it is not confirmed to be included yet, please
>>>> don't kill me over this) and hopefully I get a positive response :) .
>>> The world is so full of writing about writing about doing stuff, but
>>> short of people who actually do stuff.
>>>
>>> You are one of those writers, it appears...
>>>
>>>> I know this is not a lot but I am hoping slowly things can turn
>>>> up for the better.
>>>>
>>>> As always, am open any other ideas you might have.
>>>>
>>>> (I tried to be terse, I think I failed)
>>> What a waste of time.
>>>
>> In that case, could you tell what was the idea behind creating an
>> advocacy list, which on the site says: for promoting the use of OpenBSD ?
>>
>> Is this not what it is?
>>
>> I am also confused why so furious at me? I don't think I've done
>> anything horrible?

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Re: Improvements and thoughts on small projects for advocacy

jeanfrancois
In reply to this post by Justina Colmena
Justine,

No one except a few people probably make OpenBSD so you won't
find what you expect here, except what you put in if we can say so.

So it depends upon if you find it worthwhile to investigate.

I deeply think OpenBSD needs to remain small that's all, but it's free
you can use it if you like, and even create projects and then let us
know about it.

That's what advocacy also is for.

Regards

JF

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Re: Improvements and thoughts on small projects for advocacy

Justina Colmena


On May 15, 2020 3:04:06 AM AKDT, jeanfrancois <[hidden email]> wrote:
>Justine,
>
>No one except a few people probably make OpenBSD so you won't
>find what you expect here, except what you put in if we can say so.
There is too much "help" out there, and no enterprise to speak of. The risk of criminal prosecution is too high, people are dealing drugs on OpenBSD, and the cops are cracking down, but it sure ain't the dealers taking the fall for the drugs in any court of law. It's us "users" who haven't paid our dues for "protection" from the usual extortion rackets in town, not that we actually made a "choice" of our own free will to do anything illegal.

>
>So it depends upon if you find it worthwhile to investigate.
>
>I deeply think OpenBSD needs to remain small that's all, but it's free
A small trusted (audited) code base is great: lean and mean is definitely the right spirit, but some of the underlying hardware and the interfaces to connect to it are getting out of hand. It's  undocumented, or poorly documented, subject to NDA and exclusive agreements with SCO and MSFT.

I would need to get basic laptop hardware recognized and booted properly before I'm SWATted, trespassed off the property, arrested, and end up having all my computer equipment confiscated by corrupt thin-blue-line-flag cops on the take.

No I'm not blaming OpenBSD, don't take it that way. It's the Chaos Computer Club, the Cult of the Dead Cow, and similar groups who have gotten into the U.S. government and gained the ability to file and prosecute arbitrary criminal charges against Targeted Individuals.

>you can use it if you like, and even create projects and then let us
>know about it.
Nice. I can "use" it, "responsibly," I presume. I'm not a "hacker" and I'm not breaking any laws and I'm not taking anyone's paid job away by using open source.
>
>That's what advocacy also is for.
Well I probably do need an attorney to defend myself against all the civil and criminal allegations from the SCO team et alia, or I would, except all those attorneys are on Facebook and Twitter, they use Microsoft Windows in the office, and they're in trouble with the bar because they're all THIEVES IN LAW (воры в законе) hard at work stealing money, confiscating property, and REVOKING basic human rights and dignities "on vice" for life without recourse.

Sorry for the rant, but somehow we've got to get a grip on serious organized crime, somehow grab those guys by their scruffy white collars or dirty blue collars or whatever is the requisite clothing for their chosen profession or vocation, haul *them* into their own court system, make *them* face the charges for their crimes, rather than allowing them to live a life of crime and use their court system as a tool against us.

--
Sent from my Android device with K-9 Mail. Please excuse my brevity.

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Re: Improvements and thoughts on small projects for advocacy

Austin Hook-2

On Fri, 15 May 2020, Justina Colmena ~biz wrote:

> On May 15, 2020 3:04:06 AM AKDT, jeanfrancois <[hidden email]> wrote:
> >Justine,
> >
> >No one except a few people probably make OpenBSD so you won't
> >find what you expect here, except what you put in if we can say so.

> There is too much "help" out there, and no enterprise to speak of. The
> risk of criminal prosecution is too high, people are dealing drugs on
> OpenBSD, and the cops are cracking down, but it sure ain't the dealers
> taking the fall for the drugs in any court of law. It's us "users" who
> haven't paid our dues for "protection" from the usual extortion rackets
> in town, not that we actually made a "choice" of our own free will to do
> anything illegal.
>
> >
> >So it depends upon if you find it worthwhile to investigate.
> >
> >I deeply think OpenBSD needs to remain small that's all, but it's free

> A small trusted (audited) code base is great: lean and mean is
> definitely the right spirit, but some of the underlying hardware and the
> interfaces to connect to it are getting out of hand. It's undocumented,
> or poorly documented, subject to NDA and exclusive agreements with SCO
> and MSFT.
>
> I would need to get basic laptop hardware recognized and booted properly
> before I'm SWATted, trespassed off the property, arrested, and end up
> having all my computer equipment confiscated by corrupt
> thin-blue-line-flag cops on the take.
>
> No I'm not blaming OpenBSD, don't take it that way. It's the Chaos
> Computer Club, the Cult of the Dead Cow, and similar groups who have
> gotten into the U.S. government and gained the ability to file and
> prosecute arbitrary criminal charges against Targeted Individuals.
>
> >you can use it if you like, and even create projects and then let us
> >know about it.

> Nice. I can "use" it, "responsibly," I presume. I'm not a "hacker" and
> I'm not breaking any laws and I'm not taking anyone's paid job away by
> using open source.
> >
> >That's what advocacy also is for.

> Well I probably do need an attorney to defend myself against all the
> civil and criminal allegations from the SCO team et alia, or I would,
> except all those attorneys are on Facebook and Twitter, they use
> Microsoft Windows in the office, and they're in trouble with the bar
> because they're all THIEVES IN LAW (???? ? ??????) hard at work stealing
> money, confiscating property, and REVOKING basic human rights and
> dignities "on vice" for life without recourse.
>
> Sorry for the rant, but somehow we've got to get a grip on serious
> organized crime, somehow grab those guys by their scruffy white collars
> or dirty blue collars or whatever is the requisite clothing for their
> chosen profession or vocation, haul *them* into their own court system,
> make *them* face the charges for their crimes, rather than allowing them
> to live a life of crime and use their court system as a tool against us.

Sounds a bit paranoid to me.  

However, preserving personal freedom and safety from crooks and corruption
is an important, if endless task.    One person can't do much, but of
course, it's all those one person commitments that gave us what we have
now.  Find what you can do best, do it, and share the news.  It should
inspire others.  

OpenBSD, in it's field, is one of the most pure and interesting examples
of that kind of philosophy.

A.




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Re: Improvements and thoughts on small projects for advocacy

Theo de Raadt-2
Austin Hook <[hidden email]> wrote:

> However, preserving personal freedom and safety from crooks and corruption
> is an important, if endless task.    One person can't do much, but of
> course, it's all those one person commitments that gave us what we have
> now.  Find what you can do best, do it, and share the news.  It should
> inspire others.  

No kidding, especially from crooks like you.

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Re: Improvements and thoughts on small projects for advocacy

Theo de Raadt-2
In reply to this post by Justina Colmena
It is amazing how you keep digging up additional mandates for the
OpenBSD project!

Brilliant work.

I'm wondering if you have an view on our UFO research?


Justina Colmena ~biz <[hidden email]> wrote:

>
>
>
> On May 15, 2020 3:04:06 AM AKDT, jeanfrancois <[hidden email]> wrote:
> >Justine,
> >
> >No one except a few people probably make OpenBSD so you won't
> >find what you expect here, except what you put in if we can say so.
> There is too much "help" out there, and no enterprise to speak of. The risk of criminal prosecution is too high, people are dealing drugs on OpenBSD, and the cops are cracking down, but it sure ain't the dealers taking the fall for the drugs in any court of law. It's us "users" who haven't paid our dues for "protection" from the usual extortion rackets in town, not that we actually made a "choice" of our own free will to do anything illegal.
>
> >
> >So it depends upon if you find it worthwhile to investigate.
> >
> >I deeply think OpenBSD needs to remain small that's all, but it's free
> A small trusted (audited) code base is great: lean and mean is definitely the right spirit, but some of the underlying hardware and the interfaces to connect to it are getting out of hand. It's  undocumented, or poorly documented, subject to NDA and exclusive agreements with SCO and MSFT.
>
> I would need to get basic laptop hardware recognized and booted properly before I'm SWATted, trespassed off the property, arrested, and end up having all my computer equipment confiscated by corrupt thin-blue-line-flag cops on the take.
>
> No I'm not blaming OpenBSD, don't take it that way. It's the Chaos Computer Club, the Cult of the Dead Cow, and similar groups who have gotten into the U.S. government and gained the ability to file and prosecute arbitrary criminal charges against Targeted Individuals.
>
> >you can use it if you like, and even create projects and then let us
> >know about it.
> Nice. I can "use" it, "responsibly," I presume. I'm not a "hacker" and I'm not breaking any laws and I'm not taking anyone's paid job away by using open source.
> >
> >That's what advocacy also is for.
> Well I probably do need an attorney to defend myself against all the civil and criminal allegations from the SCO team et alia, or I would, except all those attorneys are on Facebook and Twitter, they use Microsoft Windows in the office, and they're in trouble with the bar because they're all THIEVES IN LAW (воры в законе) hard at work stealing money, confiscating property, and REVOKING basic human rights and dignities "on vice" for life without recourse.
>
> Sorry for the rant, but somehow we've got to get a grip on serious organized crime, somehow grab those guys by their scruffy white collars or dirty blue collars or whatever is the requisite clothing for their chosen profession or vocation, haul *them* into their own court system, make *them* face the charges for their crimes, rather than allowing them to live a life of crime and use their court system as a tool against us.
>
> --
> Sent from my Android device with K-9 Mail. Please excuse my brevity.
>

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Re: Improvements and thoughts on small projects for advocacy

Justina Colmena
In reply to this post by Theo de Raadt-2


On May 14, 2020 7:23:11 PM AKDT, Theo de Raadt <[hidden email]> wrote:
>That's incredibly insightful!
>
>You are precisely the true leader OpenBSD needs to compete in the
>harsh corporate environment that gives us no respect!
That might be going a bit far. You talk about *crying* on a public mailing list, and that's pretty much how it is in any case if you've got a PayPal or eBay account. It's nothing but a phishing scam. They "phish" you for information and everything you own. There's a vanity license plate "PHISH" parked next door to an auctioneer in Anchorage. People think it's cute because chartered and guided sport fishing is offered to tourists. I'm not welcome in town anymore, needless to say. It's an auction or a crying sale for everything, and some of you folks ask for people to buy computer stuff and hardware for you there.

People shamelessly burglarize, steal, rob, and extort in order to acquire all this stuff, including firearms, and then they sell it at auction, all 100% legal passed an FBI background check fingerprints and everything.

Meanwhile, I have been gradually and progressively shut out of the PayPal // eBay market and trespassed off the property of the U.S. Postal Service, Best Buy and other places where computer parts and hardware are sold. I can't obtain any of this hardware any more than anybody else can, and I usually have to pay a lot more for it than others do, to boot, if I'm even allowed to keep any computer parts in my possession without getting busted on a felony warrant by Nazi cops straight out of City Hall.

It's getting bad. I'm not lying here. I want to know exactly who these cops are, who's paying them, exactly how much, and what their political or "family"  motivations are for suddenly striking with false accusations in court and filing false criminal charges from time to time, apparently at random, but year after year without letup, in carefully arranged "setups" against certain Targeted Individuals and Personae Non Gratae.

I'm not trying to be a terrorist or go off on a shooting rampage or anything like that: it's precisely those same gun control politicians who insist with a straight face in federal court that computer cryptography is a munition of war subject to their gun control export regulations.

>
>
>
>Justina Colmena ~biz <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>>
>>
>>
>> On May 14, 2020 5:24:38 PM AKDT, Theo de Raadt <[hidden email]>
>wrote:
>> >
>> >So you go find a mailing list noone in the industry reads,
>> >and *cry* into it.
>> >
>> >never know, it might change the world.  Or not.
>> >
>> "In the industry" again. Here we go again. I've been banlisted and
>blackballed out of all those "labor unions" since my youth. They had a
>"VICA" club at my high school many years ago, and I was not invited.
>>
>> >> I'm not trying to be religious here, but Martin Luther and others
>> >have explained that we cannot make it to heaven or achieve success
>in
>> >this life by works of the law.
>> >
>> >nor can you by crying about hardware injustice on a mailing list
>> >read by noone
>>
>> Certain "working class" people aggressively claim all sorts of
>collective bargaining, work-related and employment rights and then they
>ride roughshod over basic human rights for everyone and everything
>else. It's the Mob. And then the bosses play right into their hands
>with delusions of "intellectual property," 100-year corporate
>copyrights, employee non-compete agreements and non-disclosure
>agreements, business-method patent portfolios, selectively enforced
>trademarks on common dictionary words, and government top secret
>classification for business trade secrets.
>>
>> Then the "free software" folks hired some of the same lawyers to come
>up with the "GPL," and there's an "established" Linux kernel to boot
>all that GNU software, and the Santa Cruz Operation ("SCO" out of the
>same vice district as Las Vegas, Salt Lake City, and Denver) hit them
>with poisoned code, cartel copyright allegations, and a magic solution,
>"Well, if you didn't release such reliable mission-critical code to the
>public, all would be well for the mil-spec employment market in Silicon
>Valley (San Francisco, California.)
>>
>> Noone? I don't know. In French they say «personne» unless they're
>lawyers, in which case they say «nulle personne» … they're workers. You
>can't fire them. They never quit. They're always "serving" you in court
>or at law with something or another you didn't order and you don't
>want.
>>
>> --
>> Sent from my Android device with K-9 Mail. Please excuse my brevity.
>>

--
Sent from my Android device with K-9 Mail. Please excuse my brevity.

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Re: Improvements and thoughts on small projects for advocacy

Austin Hook-2
On Sat, 16 May 2020, Justina Colmena ~biz wrote:

> On May 14, 2020 7:23:11 PM AKDT, Theo de Raadt <[hidden email]> wrote:
> >That's incredibly insightful!
> >
> >You are precisely the true leader OpenBSD needs to compete in the
> >harsh corporate environment that gives us no respect!

> That might be going a bit far. You talk about *crying* on a public
> mailing list, and that's pretty much how it is in any case if you've got
> a PayPal or eBay account. It's nothing but a phishing scam. They "phish"
> you for information and everything you own. There's a vanity license
> plate "PHISH" parked next door to an auctioneer in Anchorage. People
> think it's cute because chartered and guided sport fishing is offered to
> tourists. I'm not welcome in town anymore, needless to say. It's an
> auction or a crying sale for everything, and some of you folks ask for
> people to buy computer stuff and hardware for you there.
>
> People shamelessly burglarize, steal, rob, and extort in order to
> acquire all this stuff, including firearms, and then they sell it at
> auction, all 100% legal passed an FBI background check fingerprints and
> everything.
>
> Meanwhile, I have been gradually and progressively shut out of the
> PayPal // eBay market and trespassed off the property of the U.S. Postal
> Service, Best Buy and other places where computer parts and hardware are
> sold. I can't obtain any of this hardware any more than anybody else
> can, and I usually have to pay a lot more for it than others do, to
> boot, if I'm even allowed to keep any computer parts in my possession
> without getting busted on a felony warrant by Nazi cops straight out of
> City Hall.
>
> It's getting bad. I'm not lying here. I want to know exactly who these
> cops are, who's paying them, exactly how much, and what their political
> or "family"  motivations are for suddenly striking with false
> accusations in court and filing false criminal charges from time to
> time, apparently at random, but year after year without letup, in
> carefully arranged "setups" against certain Targeted Individuals and
> Personae Non Gratae.
>
> I'm not trying to be a terrorist or go off on a shooting rampage or
> anything like that: it's precisely those same gun control politicians
> who insist with a straight face in federal court that computer
> cryptography is a munition of war subject to their gun control export
> regulations.

Doesn't sound likely.  I have an eBay account myself.  I buy and sell some
stuff.  No problem.  I'm not afraid to be who I am.  I don't feel the need
to use pseudonyms, or being found out where I am.  (Near Milk River,
Alberta).  Sure I use DuckDuckGo instead of Google.  I use private mode
when browsing, but really don't have anything to hide.  Not really trying
to.  I use OpenBSD.  Communicate with various servers using SSH.  Use
proxy servers some times.  Basically just to minimize spam.

I have worked in politics from time to time, and had strong differences of
opinion with nearly everyone, but always ready to listen carefully to
different opinions.  Worked in civil rights in the early sixties.  Had
buddies killed by local cops down south.  Came within a hair's breath of
being taken down, on one occasion.  Sure there were corrupt racist cops
locally, but no national conspiracy against us.

Worked in the anti-war movement later.  Helped perhaps 1,000 folks settle
in Canada.  Yes, I got harassed a bit for my views.  But nothing like what
you are talking about.

Do you have a conviction for something that says you can't own computer
equipment?  May as well share the whole story.

What do you mean, no one can buy computer equipment these days?  Costco
is full of them.  Best Buy is too.  Build your own from scratch, or start
with a Raspberry Pi and scale up from there.  Plenty of old computers
around to do good work with.  Just go for it.

Worst thing happening at this moment is the attempt to outlaw full private
(no backdoor) encryption in the US.  Probably it's the number one issue we
should all fight.   Such an event would essentially destroy OpenBSD.

But on the whole your message sounds a bit unhinged.  Hope all is OK with
you.

Regards,

Hook the Crook  


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Re: Improvements and thoughts on small projects for advocacy

Ilya Mitrukov
In reply to this post by Austin Hook-2
I have hosted a meetup on OpenBSD a month ago - just a general
introduction into
the system, plus pledge / unveil, plus dynamic kernel relinking, etc,
etc. About
thirty people has attended. And you know, the audience welcomes that
type of
simple stuff and asks for continuation. I know there are russian
speaking developers
in the community. Please reach out to me directly if you're interested
in giving
a talk on anything around OpenBSD or just discussing. Venue and audience
are on me.

Ilya

On 2020-05-14 18:03, Austin Hook wrote:

> Bravo, Aisha,
>
>   I myself was wondering why "advocacy" no longer shows up on the lists of
> OpenBSD mailing lists.  It was a nice place to discuss ideas that are not
> just confined to technical software matters.  I see that is still works
> however.  Next thing is to ask the devs if they would consider putting it
> back.  
>
> Austin
>
>
> On Thu, 14 May 2020, Aisha Tammy wrote:
>
>> Hi all,
>>   I was wondering why this list is a bit dead (?!) and hoping to gain
>> some ideas for maybe reviving it.
>>
>> I totally understand that most people at openbsd are devs and would
>> like to focus more on coding than advocacy so I was wondering if people
>> like me who are not that techy (mostly small ports) can help with
>> this part.
>>
>> I am open to constructive criticism, so please forgive me if I seem
>> out of touch. I have been subscribed for close to a month and didn't
>> notice a lot of things happening around here :( so I was hoping
>> to spice things up a tiny bit.
>>
>> Most of the ways in which I have tried previously is my creating
>> whole bunch of small openbsd github projects and sharing them on reddit
>> and twitter. But like this is barely scratching the surface of social
>> media. I feel like there is a lot more that could be done :)
>>
>> Some of the basic things which I feel like are low hanging fruits
>>
>> (1) Showcasing tutorials on setting up small projects.
>>
>> One of the things that people get a good feeling from (me included)
>> is when we manage to get some service running, no matter how small
>> or insignificant it is. Like getting my znc setup, I was riding on
>> that high for like 2 weeks (I know this sounds a bit dumb cuz I am
>> a noob, but it was pretty nice to feel like I accomplished something).
>>
>> So it might be nice to  show how to set up small services.
>> I mean things like setting up a blog (using worpress or similar),
>> or a wiki, or a hugo/jekyll website.
>>
>> There are a lot of really nice blog posts by a lot of cool people
>> which show work arounds (for quirks) for these things in OpenBSD.
>>
>> It might be nice to have some kind of highlights page at openbsd
>> which shows these nice links. (I know undeadly.org exists but is
>> not pointed to by openbsd.org, would be nice if that could be done
>> if nothng else is possible)
>>
>> I feel like while OpenBSD has really awesome benefits, the communication
>> of these with the community could do with some work.
>>
>> (2) Having a bit more of a social presence
>>
>> Doesn't need to be facebook/twitter. I know undeadly.org has some really nice
>> articles with highlight for nice things happening in the tech/ports lists
>> but unfortunately undeadly is not that well known
>>
>> While I am by no means a social media expert I still feel the lack of
>> presence of OpenBSD in general media articles and published stories.
>>
>> I am open to some idea about how to try and increase this part.
>> Some ways I can think of:
>>   A) Getting in contact with news letter publishers and letting them
>>      know of nice developments that have happened. I don't think that
>>      linux news letters would be averse to having openbsd information
>>      sent on them.
>>      I am sure a lot of them would love if we send them information
>>      and do some of the work of finding articles for them, which ties
>>      into my previous part of having a highlights page
>>   B) Having an official blog
>>      I feel like this is a pretty important thing, especially in nowadays,
>>      where most things are spread online. Having an official blog will make
>>      things very easy for a lot of people to get interested. I am sure that
>>      there are quite a lot of people willing to chip in for this part if it
>>      was announced that there is going to be such an endeavor.
>>   C) (A controversial point) Trying to make things look a bit more
>>      stylistic (please don't kill me T.T )
>>      While I agree that clarity is the most important part a small amount
>>      of color in the official documentation is not the worst thing in
>>      the world. I am open to this part being thrown out.
>>
>> (3) Showcasing a page for people to get involved in various parts of
>> the project
>>
>> Currently the pipeline to get involved seems like
>> try out obsd -> find something you find is not working or you don't like ->
>> find person working on it -> contact them -> bug report/patch to change
>> (have I missed something?)
>> This seems to be a tried and true pipeline which has worked so far.
>> It might also be good to have a page of open quests/projects in openbsd
>> where new people can contribute without having to delve too deep into
>> system code. This was inspired by my recent forays into string algorithms
>> on OpenBSD (nothing wrong with them, just that I was looking around and
>> trying to see what could be changed/improved).
>>
>> Having devs post TODOs and help needed/appreciated into a web page allows for
>> interested parties to get a better look at ongoing projects.
>>
>> Currently I haven't figured out anyway to see what current new projects
>> are being developed in OpenBSD. I feel like showcasing ongoing projects
>> is just as important as showing completed ones in the highlights.
>>
>> (While watching presentations are conferences is definitely one way to see
>> ongoing projects it is nowhere near and optimal approach)
>>
>> ----
>>
>> These three were my main points in sending this email.
>> Sorry that it got a bit long in the process.
>>
>> Any things that I might be wrong about, I assure you I mean nothing harmful
>> so do let me know what I have missed and erred on.
>> I am only started using OpenBSD for a short while for less than 7-8 months
>> but I feel like in those 7-8 months a lot of the things that I have learned could
>> have benefited from the above points to make the transition simpler :)
>>
>> These are my personal thoughts so take them with handful of salt.
>>
>> Hope you all are staying safe,
>> Aisha
>>

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Re: Improvements and thoughts on small projects for advocacy

Justina Colmena
In reply to this post by Theo de Raadt-2


On May 15, 2020 9:46:16 AM AKDT, Theo de Raadt <[hidden email]> wrote:
>It is amazing how you keep digging up additional mandates for the
>OpenBSD project!
>
>Brilliant work.
>
>I'm wondering if you have an view on our UFO research?
>
>
There's Area 51, of course, from the same _area_ as SCO and the headquarters of GoDaddy, the popular domain registrar. How far is Roswell from Santa Cruz? New Mexico is a mental health state. It's not clear what did or didn't happen, but the ancient feudal system of Spanish common law remains to this day in the Southwest U.S. as if the revolution of Cinco de Mayo has been rolled back, never mind U.S. independence and jurisdiction in that area. E.U. and NATO are operating there, it would seem.

More in my area we have H.A.A.R.P. (High-altitude Active Auroral Research Project) which grew out of some strangely conceived joint project between Eielson Air Force Base officials and University of Alaska Fairbanks faculty back from when (mostly liberal) college students and (mostly conservative) military personnel had somewhat more peaceful and cordial relations than they do today. The top-secret project is still in existence, reportedly with private non-governmental funding from philanthropist George Soros, who is rather quite at odds and not very well disposed at all toward the current presidential administration of Donald Trump.
--
Sent from my Android device with K-9 Mail. Please excuse my brevity.

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