Commands don't work after rm -rf /*

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Commands don't work after rm -rf /*

fuzzyping
I wrote a script that tested inode performance by removing unwanted  
blocks.  It was pretty simple, so I tested it first against the first  
slice (it's the smallest, so it should be a quick test).  However,  
something happened after I ran the script and the system no longer  
responds.  Even rebooting the system, it just hangs where I would  
expect to see the boot> prompt.

Perhaps there is some sort of performance inhibitor in the kernel  
that stops users from performing these delete tests against a whole  
partition?  If not, surely there should be some way to protect stupid  
users from themselves.  Or perhaps I should have just called the  
command (rm -rf /) manually, rather than by ksh?  What's with this  
shell anyways, give me bash!


-J.

(sig withheld)




























</sarcasm>

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Re: Commands don't work after rm -rf /*

Diana Eichert
I wrote a script that automagically sent e-mail to the OpenBSD misc@ list.
from reading the list it appears I can send to a variety of e-mail
addresses, including this one [hidden email], in order to get e-mail
to the list.  However I never see the automagically generated e-mails show
up on the OpenBSD misc@ MARC archive.  Is there a problem with Jason
Dixon?  Shouldn't he be forwarding all my e-mail to the misc@ list?



;-)

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Re: Commands don't work after rm -rf /*

Alexander Hall
In reply to this post by fuzzyping
Jason Dixon wrote:

> I wrote a script that tested inode performance by removing unwanted
> blocks.  It was pretty simple, so I tested it first against the first
> slice (it's the smallest, so it should be a quick test).  However,
> something happened after I ran the script and the system no longer
> responds.  Even rebooting the system, it just hangs where I would
> expect to see the boot> prompt.
>
> Perhaps there is some sort of performance inhibitor in the kernel
> that stops users from performing these delete tests against a whole
> partition?  If not, surely there should be some way to protect stupid
> users from themselves.  Or perhaps I should have just called the
> command (rm -rf /) manually, rather than by ksh?  What's with this
> shell anyways, give me bash!

I ran your test and got the same result, so this is a bug in OpenBSD and
they should fix it.



























> </sarcasm>

</sarcasm>

(Oh this thread could be long. Crappy that I could not resist, since it's
indirect troll-feeding)

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Re: Commands don't work after rm -rf /*

Bryan Irvine
In reply to this post by fuzzyping
On 12/5/06, Jason Dixon <[hidden email]> wrote:

>
> I wrote a script that tested inode performance by removing unwanted
> blocks.  It was pretty simple, so I tested it first against the first
> slice (it's the smallest, so it should be a quick test).  However,
> something happened after I ran the script and the system no longer
> responds.  Even rebooting the system, it just hangs where I would
> expect to see the boot> prompt.
>
> Perhaps there is some sort of performance inhibitor in the kernel
> that stops users from performing these delete tests against a whole
> partition?  If not, surely there should be some way to protect stupid
> users from themselves.  Or perhaps I should have just called the
> command (rm -rf /) manually, rather than by ksh?  What's with this
> shell anyways, give me bash!
>


It's the anti-unix newbie avoidance system.  I propose a source change to rm
that *after* it has completed removing / it then displays a dialog that "the
system would prefer it if you ran windows millennium".  ;)

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Re: Commands don't work after rm -rf /*

Shane J Pearson
On 06/12/2006, at 12:14 PM, Bryan Irvine wrote:

> It's the anti-unix newbie avoidance system.  I propose a source  
> change to rm
> that *after* it has completed removing / it then displays a dialog  
> that "the
> system would prefer it if you ran windows millennium".  ;)

Oh man, that's low. I can understand being sentenced to Windows, but  
ME? That's harsh.

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Re: Commands don't work after rm -rf /*

Mike Erdely
In reply to this post by Diana Eichert
On Tue, December 5, 2006 7:33 pm, Diana Eichert wrote:
>Is there a problem with Jason Dixon?

Is that a leading question?

> ;-)

:)

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Re: Commands don't work after rm -rf /*

Woodchuck-2
In reply to this post by Alexander Hall
On Wed, 6 Dec 2006, [hidden email] wrote:

> Jason Dixon wrote:
> > I wrote a script that tested inode performance by removing unwanted
> > blocks.  It was pretty simple, so I tested it first against the first
> > slice (it's the smallest, so it should be a quick test).  However,
> > something happened after I ran the script and the system no longer
> > responds.  Even rebooting the system, it just hangs where I would
> > expect to see the boot> prompt.
> >
> > Perhaps there is some sort of performance inhibitor in the kernel
> > that stops users from performing these delete tests against a whole
> > partition?  If not, surely there should be some way to protect stupid
> > users from themselves.  Or perhaps I should have just called the
> > command (rm -rf /) manually, rather than by ksh?  What's with this
> > shell anyways, give me bash!
>
> I ran your test and got the same result, so this is a bug in OpenBSD and
> they should fix it.

This has been fixed in -current.

Dave

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Re: Commands don't work after rm -rf /*

RedShift
In reply to this post by Shane J Pearson
Shane J Pearson wrote:

> On 06/12/2006, at 12:14 PM, Bryan Irvine wrote:
>
>> It's the anti-unix newbie avoidance system.  I propose a source change
>> to rm
>> that *after* it has completed removing / it then displays a dialog
>> that "the
>> system would prefer it if you ran windows millennium".  ;)
>
> Oh man, that's low. I can understand being sentenced to Windows, but ME?
> That's harsh.
>
>
>

Yeah true, the whole 9x series are the worst operating systems in
history. I do like windows xp though.

Glenn